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All you New Grads

Has 15 years experience. Specializes in med surg.

All you new grads and newly licensed RN's what would like to see in your orientation program? I am trying to modify our program for what best meets the needs of GN's and most of them are pretty quiet about what they would like to see changed/

Any ideas?:bow:

nursing twin, CNA

Specializes in OR Nursing Internship.

I was recently in a new grad orientation in the OR. They really had a great supportive atmosphere. We met with all new grads in a meeting to discuss how the week went. If we had issues their office doors were always open. Problems were discussed without blame. I think it's really hard to talk about issues as a new grad. You don't know if it's you or not because everythings so new. We also had preceptors that really wanted to precept. We had a paid breakfast with preceptors and another with DON. The leaders were really attentive and stopped by each day even just to say hi. In the lunch room when I knew little people, somebody would always welcome me and say "sit with me". I think orientation needs to be personalized somewhat so that new grads feel that they are important to the hospital and you. It's hard enough to start nursing but there is a scary social environment to adjust as well. When you feel happier...the nursing is just a little less intimidating when you feel supported.

For me, I wish that my employer would provide us with the opportunity to have workshop days to come in and review CPGs/CMGs. We are reminded in our mandatory classes that these are available online and to use them as we see fit, but as a new grad, chances are, when I am caught in an emergency situation that a CPG/CMG would accompany, I am going to be far too overwhelmed to view that as a resource.

I also wish we had been given the opportunity to really familiarize ourselves with the charting and where to find information in the chart. I've been frustrated on many occasions, not being able to find the information in a chart when I knew it was in there somewhere but I just couldn't find where it was.

My employer also offers us a 4 Day Rhythm Course. I have yet to take it, but have heard it is an awesome class. However, I wish we had been able to take it earlier in our orientation. Here I am, going into my 10th and final week of orientation and yet my mind is all over the place when it comes to identifying rhythms.

I also wish we had a class about adequate documentation. Yes, they touch on that in NS, but not to the degree that is required once we are in the real world and have our license on the line. My preceptor is very laid back about documentation and just tells me to "write what I see, hear, feel, witness, etc." Sure, that makes it sound simple, but to write objectively as a new grad can be really, really hard sometimes. I think this is a very important aspect of nursing that is so often overlooked during the orientation period.

I'm sure I could think of others, but these come to mind the most.

Melinurse

Specializes in LTC, case mgmt, agency.

We have a pretty good one at our facility.

Week 1 : orient to unit, go over paperwork and facility documentation. 2 shadow days with RN who will be preceptor.

Week 2 : take 2 patients and continue to go over paperwork/documentation. Plus 1 day with wound care nurse shadowing.

Week 3 : take 2-3 patients. Watch video about procedures unique to our floor.

Week 4 : take 4 patients.

Week 5 : take 4 - 5 patients.

Week 6 : take 5 patients

Week 7 : take 5-6 patients

Week 8 : take 6 patients

Week 9 : take 7 patients

They give us several classes in there too on med-surg, stoma care, feeding tubes, IV therapy, orthopaedics, care of pt with CVA/TIA, ostomy care, and 2 on pressure ulcers , and a skin and wound care video. :nurse:

suni, BSN, RN

Has 15 years experience. Specializes in med surg.

Thank you for your replies. We also have a 6-8 week orientation program and do classes and also a rhtyhm class for those working on a monitored unit. I appreciate the time you all took to answer my questions and have gotten some good ideas from your replies of things we could include and update.

ChristineN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatric/Adolescent, Med-Surg.

My facilty offers a 12 week orientation for new grads. The first week and a half is spent in class, with periodic follow up classes for the remainder of orientation. I've had classes on trach and G tube care, phlebotomy, blood administration, IV insertion, med math, charting, IV assessment (INS scoring), Central lines, and more. I think, that especially as a new grad offering these classes were very helpful. Even though I may not see some of these issues come up often on my floor, at least I'll be more prepared when I do have a pt with a trach.

Melinurse

Specializes in LTC, case mgmt, agency.

My facilty offers a 12 week orientation for new grads. The first week and a half is spent in class, with periodic follow up classes for the remainder of orientation. I've had classes on trach and G tube care, phlebotomy, blood administration, IV insertion, med math, charting, IV assessment (INS scoring), Central lines, and more. I think, that especially as a new grad offering these classes were very helpful. Even though I may not see some of these issues come up often on my floor, at least I'll be more prepared when I do have a pt with a trach.

WOW!!! That sounds like a totally nice orientation. I would love it if we had those classes too. :D Sounds like a great place to work.:nurse:

2bnursenikki82

Specializes in ICU, Psych.

We have a 12 week orientation for the ICU I work in. The first three weeks are spent in the classroom going over policies and covering specific things we'll see on the unit by body system. Some of it is a little nursing school all over again, but we're doing this whole two day EKG thing, and it is making so much more sense than it did in school! Then we spend the next 9 weeks slowly getting into the swing of things on the unit with our preceptor. The classroom time is very relaxed, which is good, because everything can get VERY overwhelming. I'm anxious to actually get out on the unit and get my hands on a patient though!

glamgalRN

Has 5 years experience. Specializes in oncology, transplant, OB.

I would say the most difficult part of my orientation was not knowing what really was expected of me. I and had no idea what was "normal" as a new grad, like where I should be at as far as time mgt, nursing skills, etc. I realize everyone learns at their own pace, however for some reason I just felt like I was so far behind the other new orientees. But then again I don't know if that was all in my head or if it was actually true.

We also had a bunch of classes we had to take and tests as well. Our first week we learned about hospital policy and at the end of the week we went over skills. Then for the following 2-4 weeks, we had time on the floor mixed in with classes and tests. I wish that instead of mixing the class time w/floor time that we devoted the 1st 3 weeks or so just doing classroom stuff and then once we were familiar w/everyone then we could start on the floor.

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