Jump to content

ADN or BSN- Quickest Admission or Dream School?

I am in Oklahoma and finishing my last semester of Nursing Pre-Reqs....

I am trying to decide if I should just go the route that allows me an acceptance the quickest (which are ADN programs that I am not very familiar with or have heard much about) and then go on to a RN to BSN program, and then a Masters program. I could actually apply to my dream school for the RN to BSN and/or Master's programs but it is extremely competitive. But I could probably start the ADN program as early as Jan 2018 or Aug 2018 and be an RN in 2020 but would have more schooling of course.

Or, I can wait and apply to my dream school which is an accelerated BSN program at the University of Oklahoma. I will not get in this application period though, so I would not be able to apply until October 2018. IF I got in, I would start JUNE 2019 and would have my BSN and be an RN AUGUST 2020.

It seems like a no brainer and wait to apply for my dream school, but my concern is waiting a year just to apply and IF I didn't get accepted, having waisted all that time and being no closer to getting in.

I'm so torn!

Sour Lemon

Has 9 years experience.

But I could probably start the ADN program as early as Jan 2018 or Aug 2018 and be an RN in 2020 but would have more schooling of course.

When you say you could "probably" start the ADN program sooner, how sure are you? ADN programs can be fiercely competitive. How employable are ADNs verses BSNs in your area?

When you say you could "probably" start the ADN program sooner, how sure are you? ADN programs can be fiercely competitive. How employable are ADNs verses BSNs in your area?

This. Have you researched your job market? What are people hiring? In my area ASN programs can be much more competitive than BSN schools due to the fact that they are much more cost effective and you can work while obtaining your BSN.

Do some checking and make decisions based on your brain, not your heart.

These particular schools go off a point system that I'm very competitive in- actually more competitive than most other programs. I'm in Tulsa and ADNs are getting highered easily with no huge advantage of the BSN from what I've been able to tell. Of course I plan to go higher in education, but my husband sees it as beneficial for my to become a nurse and have that salary coming in as quickly as possible and go for the higher education while working or after having worked a bit.

I think realistically I am pretty certain to get in Aug '18 at latest but am able to apply for this upcoming spring too- just don't think I'll get in since I have classes pending that don't finish by the deadline.

For the BSN program, I realistically wouldn't get started until June-Aug '19

Sour Lemon

Has 9 years experience.

These particular schools go off a point system that I'm very competitive in- actually more competitive than most other programs. I'm in Tulsa and ADNs are getting highered easily with no huge advantage of the BSN from what I've been able to tell. Of course I plan to go higher in education, but my husband sees it as beneficial for my to become a nurse and have that salary coming in as quickly as possible and go for the higher education while working or after having worked a bit.

I agree with your husband considering the circumstances. I got my ASN at a community college for the same reasons.

roser13, ASN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC. Has 17 years experience.

These particular schools go off a point system that I'm very competitive in- actually more competitive than most other programs. I'm in Tulsa and ADNs are getting highered easily with no huge advantage of the BSN from what I've been able to tell. Of course I plan to go higher in education, but my husband sees it as beneficial for my to become a nurse and have that salary coming in as quickly as possible and go for the higher education while working or after having worked a bit.

"Highered" as in hired?

When considering an ABSN, always throw in the added complication of "if I finish". Accelerted BSNs are much tougher with higher attrition rates than standard BSN programs.

ADN: finish sooner and earn money sooner, but will have added complication of RN to BSN or RN to MSN in future.

ABSN: finish later, if you get in, if you make it through the program, income earning delayed, but you get to be a Sooner.

Another thing to consider is the cost of the program, although it might not be a big difference, because OU's program is about $18,000, which is incredibly affordable for an ABSN.

I would suggest the ADN program. There are a lot of "if's" with the ABSN, added to the delayed earned income factor. If you really want to be a Sooner, get your Masters through them later.

Boomer!! Lol. Thanks for the input guys! I think I do need to shoot for the adn programs and only consider the BSN if I get to the point where it's fall of next year and I'm not started somewhere yet. Doesn't hurt to apply but will keep my head out of the clouds!

Nature_walker, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in psych. Has 4 years experience.

I agree with PP, ADN programs can be very competitive. Mine had a waiting list. I had a 4.0 and I was placed on the waitlist. Luckily, I was top of the list, so I was able to get into the cohort I wanted so I could start right away. I was hired before graduation, and now work is footing most of the bill for me to go for the RN to BSN program. Not a bad deal!

×

By using the site you agree to our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies.

OK