Jump to content

Administration lacks the reasoning ability of a 5 year old

Nurses   (3,127 Views 30 Comments)
by hherrn hherrn (Member)

16,860 Visitors; 1,543 Posts

advertisement

You are reading page 3 of Administration lacks the reasoning ability of a 5 year old. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

1 Article; 2,241 Visitors; 55 Posts

perhaps you should real the whole post, because this nurse DID offer a solution. a good one, too.

that solution was a "good one"??? give me a break. do you honestly think that the manager is going to follow a nurse around and time them to see how long it takes them to complete a task? get real. oh, and no, I'm not in management. I've just got some common sense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4,212 Visitors; 228 Posts

Groupthink: The phenomenon where a group arrives at a decision collectively that no single person in the group would come to if they had to make a decision individually.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

16,860 Visitors; 1,543 Posts

actually, no I'm not. don't care to be. but i do think that the op's "solution" is juvenile and unrealistic. No manager is going to spend their day following around nurses and timing them on how long it takes for them to complete a new task. If the op wants to be taken seriously, the management is going to want to see data, research...you know...evidenced based practice. so, do the research, prepare the data in an easy to follow format and present it to the admin. but seriously, whining and complaining about it isn't going to change anything, except maybe your blood pressure.

Gee, "juvenile" seems a little harsh. I have spent years in various supervisory roles, and it would never occur to me to add to a subordinate's workload with taking into account the effect. One thing I have done is to ask the person how the new task will affect their job, and made modifications based on my priorities. In order to do this, I would have to know how long the new task takes.

On the other hand, I do kind of like your approach. Even if an employee is allready working to full capacity, I'll just add something to his workload. Then, if he whines and complains, IE points out that what I am expecting is physically impossible, I will tell him to do some research, collect data, and present it to me in an easy to follow format. Bonus for cool graphics.

I feel kind of silly that as a manager, I took responsibility for the volume of work I assigned.

Thanks for your input.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 Article; 2,241 Visitors; 55 Posts

Gee, "juvenile" seems a little harsh. I have spent years in various supervisory roles, and it would never occur to me to add to a subordinate's workload with taking into account the effect. One thing I have done is to ask the person how the new task will affect their job, and made modifications based on my priorities. In order to do this, I would have to know how long the new task takes.

On the other hand, I do kind of like your approach. Even if an employee is allready working to full capacity, I'll just add something to his workload. Then, if he whines and complains, IE points out that what I am expecting is physically impossible, I will tell him to do some research, collect data, and present it to me in an easy to follow format. Bonus for cool graphics.

I feel kind of silly that as a manager, I took responsibility for the volume of work I assigned.

Thanks for your input.

were you attempting to be sarcastic?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

16,860 Visitors; 1,543 Posts

Nope.

Just tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4,212 Visitors; 228 Posts

that solution was a "good one"??? give me a break. do you honestly think that the manager is going to follow a nurse around and time them to see how long it takes them to complete a task? get real. oh, and no, I'm not in management. I've just got some common sense.

This timing technique suggested, when implemented properly, is a fantastic way to highlight wasteful parts of a process. It is one of the reasons that Toyota did so well as a car company while American auto makers faltered.

The technique gives management and workers objective data to use to improve work habits. It is not the times themselves that are important, but what is being done during those times. Anything that is detracting from providing competent patient care is considered "waste". Important: proper documentation is NOT waste.

As an oversimplified example: Lets say you follow a CNA while they do a check and change on a resident. You note the CNA spent 10 minutes going downstairs to the supply room twice because the utility rooms were not fully stocked. Sure, it is "common sense" to keep the damn utility rooms stocked, but management doesn't make sure it happens until they see exactly how much money they are wasting. This could highlight a systemic problem that management would not have otherwise addressed.

This type of process improvement activity is extremely difficult to implement in the United States for two reasons: 1. US middle and upper level managers don't like to work, and 2. Our individualistic society prevents us from willfully and productively participating in such exercises.

Workers in the US feel they should always be "left alone" to do their job they see fit. Many are as uninterested in working with management as management is at working with them. So wasteful processes continue.

The overall strategy is called "Lean Manufacturing." When implemented correctly, it is invaluable. Unfortunately, most "Lean" implementations fail in the US due to worker attitudes and lack of competence in rolling it out.

dc

Edited by sirI

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing 0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×