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A.D.N. or B.S.N... what do you think?

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So I'm currently researching options here in Central Florida.

I will have an A.A. in general studies at the end of summer semester. With those classes done I need 5 classes into get the Seminole Community College program which I can reasonably do in 3 semesters leaving me ready to go in for the Fall of '09.

However, I just did some research on UCF and I just need 3 more classes to get into their BSN program. If I'm figuring correctly, if I start with the prereqs taken care of in Fall of '09, I'd be done in the Summer of 2010 (3 semesters??).

First, is there any benefit for having a BSN?

Second, does anyone know anything about the UCF program? How hard it is to get in... how many of the community college pre req credits they'll take... how hard the program is... etc... Thanks everyone!!!!!! :typing

luv4nursing

Specializes in Med/Surg, Tele, Peds, LDRP. Has 5 years experience.

Ok, Ive heard from several people that if you are applying to the generic BSN program at UCF or basically any college, you had better have something close to a 4.0 to even have a chance. Ive heard of ppl with 3.5s and 3.7's not getting in...ridiculous.

So depending on your GPA you could apply there, or just apply to both SCC and UCF, and apply to Valencia too. I went to Valencia and it was a good program, however I took the LPN to RN bridge so I dont know a lot about the generic program. Not sure where u live in Orlando, but look into Daytona Beach Comm College too if it wouldnt be too far of a commute (I took summer classes there and applied there for backup). You can get away without having to take biology as a prereq to micro if u take your micro at dbcc...thats what I did. Valencia and SCC require biology as a prereq to micro although biology isnt a required course to get into the program. It saved me from taking an extra science course.

Basically your BSN doesnt get you much, if any additional money (some hospitals give u like an extra 50 cents or dollar an hour, its not really substantial). The main purpose would be as a stepping stone to your MSN.

HTH!

So I just discovered something. SCC has a Concurrent program with UCF allowing you to take both your ADN and your BSN classes simultaneously. In short, you finish a lot shorter and really all it does is make your course load a bit heavier.

I'm not certain I want my MSN but I'd like the option. It would be nice to know I was almost there should I decide to be a Nurse Practitioner.

I'm currently trying to apply to SCC and then once I'm there and taking my prereqs I'm planning on going to talk to the Concurrent Program director about getting into the SCC/UCF program.

In the meantime, my GPA isn't the absolute best but it's getting better. I messed up in College back in 2000 (I was young and dumb) but have gotten pretty close to straight A's since I've been back in school. :nurse:

I am starting at VCC next month. Just FYI, SCC is on a points system I believe. They take applications for a specific semester and then whoever has the highest points, based on grades mostly but a few other things too, they get in and if you don't get in then you have to apply again and hope to get in.

At Valencia, as long as you have your prereqs done and all of the requirements are ment you get in but there is a year wait. And you can't apply until your prereqs are complete - not sure if SCC is the same about that. Valencia has what they call the "Articulation Agreement" with UCF, but I don't know alot about that. Good luck!!

luv4nursing

Specializes in Med/Surg, Tele, Peds, LDRP. Has 5 years experience.

So I just discovered something. SCC has a Concurrent program with UCF allowing you to take both your ADN and your BSN classes simultaneously. In short, you finish a lot shorter and really all it does is make your course load a bit heavier.

I'm not certain I want my MSN but I'd like the option. It would be nice to know I was almost there should I decide to be a Nurse Practitioner.

I'm currently trying to apply to SCC and then once I'm there and taking my prereqs I'm planning on going to talk to the Concurrent Program director about getting into the SCC/UCF program.

In the meantime, my GPA isn't the absolute best but it's getting better. I messed up in College back in 2000 (I was young and dumb) but have gotten pretty close to straight A's since I've been back in school. :nurse:

That sounds like a good plan...if you have your ASN you arent held up to the same standards to get into UCFs BSN program bc it would be an ASN-BSN transition. I want to start my BSN at St Pete College this fall, but my husband and I may be moving so I wouldnt want to start if I couldnt finish.

Well, I spoke to a Nurse Practioner today and she suggested to go for the BSN. She said it's a lot easier to move up the ladder and with an ADN you may get looked over even though you're perfectly qualified. I just finished another semester towards my A.A. and my GPA just shot up to a 3.6 (so very happy) so my chances of getting into Nursing School are looking better.

Go for the BSN since you will have an AA. The ADNs are good for the people who don't like college and are just going to be a RN. Actually they are moving towards making the LPN program two years, and to become an RN, the BSN four year will be the only way. Oh, and as far as the GPA, they are about the same.

I decided to do the ADN because I had an AA with the pre-reqs done, but needed 3 more for the BSN. The ADN GPA average is 3.8, because they only look at the pre-reqs. The BSN looks at your overall GPA. Therefore, the ADN is better for some, but not for me. My overall GPA is 3.85 with 97 credits, but 3.77 for the ADN pre-reqs. Anyway, with my 3.77, I didn't get selected at first. Both programs are two years. The only thing that changes is the amount of pre-reqs.

labrador4122, RN

Specializes in Tele.

Go for the BSN since you will have an AA. The ADNs are good for the people who don't like college and are just going to be a RN. Actually they are moving towards making the LPN program two years, and to become an RN, the BSN four year will be the only way. Oh, and as far as the GPA, they are about the same.

I decided to do the ADN because I had an AA with the pre-reqs done, but needed 3 more for the BSN. The ADN GPA average is 3.8, because they only look at the pre-reqs. The BSN looks at your overall GPA. Therefore, the ADN is better for some, but not for me. My overall GPA is 3.85 with 97 credits, but 3.77 for the ADN pre-reqs. Anyway, with my 3.77, I didn't get selected at first. Both programs are two years. The only thing that changes is the amount of pre-reqs.

when pigs fly will be when they require RN's to have BSN degrees. they have been saying that for years. There is a great shortage of nurses that hospitals bring RN's from other countries to work here such as the philipines.

and just because you have your AS in nursing does not mean that you are looked over! we get treated just like the BSN nurse! in fact the BSN nurse only gets $0.50 cents more an hour than we do! they have to work up the latter like we do. You do have to have a BSN to have more door and job opportunities offered to you though. AS nurses with our AS we are very limited on the many possible jobs we could have if we had our BSN. we are more bedside nurses, but there are those lucky ones that find "paper" jobs soon after they are done with school. I know a person that as soon as she graduated from community college started working in utilization review. so you never know where you will end up.

:nurse:.

labrador4122, RN

Specializes in Tele.

Go for the BSN since you will have an AA. The ADNs are good for the people who don't like college and are just going to be a RN. Actually they are moving towards making the LPN program two years, and to become an RN, the BSN four year will be the only way. Oh, and as far as the GPA, they are about the same.

I decided to do the ADN because I had an AA with the pre-reqs done, but needed 3 more for the BSN. The ADN GPA average is 3.8, because they only look at the pre-reqs. The BSN looks at your overall GPA. Therefore, the ADN is better for some, but not for me. My overall GPA is 3.85 with 97 credits, but 3.77 for the ADN pre-reqs. Anyway, with my 3.77, I didn't get selected at first. Both programs are two years. The only thing that changes is the amount of pre-reqs.

BTW I do like college and I have my ASN in nursing RN

ufblondi

Specializes in ICU. Has 3 years experience.

Hello Nurse2b,

I currently attend UCF for their accelerated nursing program. This is for students with a BS in another field to go back and receive their BSN. This is a 15 month program that runs from May-August of the following year. I am not sure where you see a 3 semester BSN program as I know their basic BSN is 2 years long. I'm not sure if they accept transfer students into this program and if they do, it is probably pretty competitive. Your 3.6 will help you out a lot though. I know they base their admissions mainly on gpa...so keep it up! Let me know if you have any other questions and good luck!

labrador4122, RN

Specializes in Tele.

Go for the BSN since you will have an AA. The ADNs are good for the people who don't like college and are just going to be a RN. Actually they are moving towards making the LPN program two years, and to become an RN, the BSN four year will be the only way. Oh, and as far as the GPA, they are about the same.

I decided to do the ADN because I had an AA with the pre-reqs done, but needed 3 more for the BSN. The ADN GPA average is 3.8, because they only look at the pre-reqs. The BSN looks at your overall GPA. Therefore, the ADN is better for some, but not for me. My overall GPA is 3.85 with 97 credits, but 3.77 for the ADN pre-reqs. Anyway, with my 3.77, I didn't get selected at first. Both programs are two years. The only thing that changes is the amount of pre-reqs.

BTW I am not "just going to be a RN", I am going to school in the fall for my BSN.

I think that school is very important. And having a BSN opens more doors for us RN's to be able to get different types of other jobs besides bedside nursing. Perhaps I will want to get my MSN in the future-

so never think that AS nurses just want to be only RN's and not move up in the career world

BTW I am not "just going to be a RN", I am going to school in the fall for my BSN.

I think that school is very important. And having a BSN opens more doors for us RN's to be able to get different types of other jobs besides bedside nursing. Perhaps I will want to get my MSN in the future-

so never think that AS nurses just want to be only RN's and not move up in the career world

I am glad that you think that continuing your education is important, congrats. I was saying that a lot of RNs don't want to go further or want to and just can't for whatever reason. It has a lot to do with the fact that the average age of the nursing students in the ADN programs is 35, and it is their second or third career. The older people get, the less likely they will continue to further their education because they have families and bills to deal with.

labrador4122, RN

Specializes in Tele.

I totally know where you are comming from.

It depends on the person- and if RN is your second career.

I admire everyone who wants to be an RN for a living.

RN is my second career after being a nursing assistant! LOL!

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