Nursing in France - page 4

by bambi007 178,012 Views | 216 Comments

Is there anyone who can fill me in on RN jobs in France. I prefer the city hospiitals, I work in ICU currently. I have many years exp in Med Surg also. Would like to hear from someone. If you know about pay scale and such... Read More


  1. 0
    hello hello! just new here and already i'm getting so much information on what i've spent weeks looking for in other sites! this site rocks!!
    anyway, i am also interested in moving to france ( hopefully not too far from paris ) to live with my fiance.
    you guys make it sound so easy. i've found a small section on how much nurses earn in france and was rather put off with the whole thing coz my calculations work out i'll be earning £1000 less than working in london.
    does anyone here know roughly how much renting a house/flat cost in france?
    how does it work? i've been told that a nurse earns +/- 1200 euro, is that true? i am just afraid to jump in too quick as i don't want to resign from a good post in london just to find myself in a parisian pickle
    but first, i now know that one has to be completely fluent in french ( which i am in the process of applying for this summer ). is there an agency to help with the transition from london to paris ( or round about )? i am trained in london and qualified here.
    cheers for the info that anyone here may add
  2. 0
    1950 euros is about $2,300/month salary???

    How can you live on that?? Has anyone worked in Italy???
    I would think that between trying to own a car, living expenses-----owning a home versus just renting, that is not good salary for the long run????
  3. 0
    Quote from lee1
    1950 euros is about $2,300/month salary???

    How can you live on that?? Has anyone worked in Italy???
    I would think that between trying to own a car, living expenses-----owning a home versus just renting, that is not good salary for the long run????

    in the UK 1950 euros = 1,322 pounds which is really good for a months wage. More than what I get and I am a grade F but don't have unsociable hours
  4. 0
    Quote from DNAl
    Hi Dudette or anyone out there

    Great website, very informative. This is my first posting.

    I moved from the UK to France 3 years ago and have just left a management post in the tourist industry. I wish to return to nursing. Having looked at this forum, I contacted the DDASS and It took them 4 months before they would see me. My comprehension and spoken French is good, but I am not fluent. Whilst acknowledging that my diploma is valid, the personnel at the DDASS now insist that I spend 6 months familiarising myself with French medical terms and pharmacology before they will let me nurse here. However they tell me that there are no 'return to nursing' courses in France and have offered no help. I am trying to find work experience at my local hospital, but wondered if any one knows if there is in fact a nursing course anywhere in France for returners to the profession.
    I have purchased French nursing books and am studying these in the meantime.

    Thanks,
    Al
    Hi and sorry for answering so late, but I just read your question !
    All I can tell you, is that a friend of my Mum who is a RN, had to do a stage of 6 months after 10 years of non activity, to be allowed to work as a nurse again. I know it is very long, but I don't know any course to return to the profession.
    We have a lot of nurses coming from Spain, and I can tell you their french is not always very good when they arrive. But working every day, they improve it very very quickly, and we are used to their accent too so the comunication is going better quickly. It is not a problem for long. Plus, I know lots of them came directly to the clinic to look for a job and I wonder if it is not the clinic that makes the papers for them. Do you have a European diploma?
  5. 0
    Quote from era
    hello hello! just new here and already i'm getting so much information on what i've spent weeks looking for in other sites! this site rocks!!
    anyway, i am also interested in moving to france ( hopefully not too far from paris ) to live with my fiance.
    you guys make it sound so easy. i've found a small section on how much nurses earn in france and was rather put off with the whole thing coz my calculations work out i'll be earning £1000 less than working in london.
    does anyone here know roughly how much renting a house/flat cost in france?
    how does it work? i've been told that a nurse earns +/- 1200 euro, is that true? i am just afraid to jump in too quick as i don't want to resign from a good post in london just to find myself in a parisian pickle
    but first, i now know that one has to be completely fluent in french ( which i am in the process of applying for this summer ). is there an agency to help with the transition from london to paris ( or round about )? i am trained in london and qualified here.
    cheers for the info that anyone here may add
    hi era!
    i am a rn for 4 years now and i am working as an agency nurse (intérimaire) at night. for a full time, witch is 15 nights per months, i earn 1950 euros a month. this salary is what you have after the social taxes are taking of. means after you have paid for social security which is very good here, because you can be cured or buy medicines for free with your "mutuelle" wich is about 30 euros per month. plus in that taxes your retirement plan is included too, your job insurance as well. so these are things you don't have to pay for as in usa. plus the cost for an appartment is lower. i am living by the méditerrannée, in south of france, and you pay 500 euros per month for a 3 bedroom. it is more expensive in paris of course, but you can have a better salary there too. you have to know about public and private for the establishment too. "cliniques" are private and "hopital" are public. public pays better than private but i don't know if you can be hired if you are not native from france. you have a lot of advantages for retirement, hollidays, and so on...
    private can be "ccu" (convention collective unique) that is these ones that pay the less. or "fehap", that is non lucrative organisation, that pays almost as well as public, with the 13th month for instance, that you don't have with ccu. it is a little bit complicated, but these are things that makes a difference at the end of the month!
    sorry i gotta go, i am working tonight! just let me know if i can help.
    ciao!!!
  6. 0
    Quote from Silverdragon102
    in the UK 1950 euros = 1,322 pounds which is really good for a months wage. More than what I get and I am a grade F but don't have unsociable hours

    Hi, have you checked you're in the right category?
    How come I'm getting more than you? I'm grade E ( dunno if top E though as I've been an E grade for a few years!) I suppose the unsocial hours make a massive difference... ? do one night per rota?
    Kind regards
    -x-
  7. 0
    Quote from Dudette
    Hi Era!
    I am a RN for 4 years now and I am working as an agency nurse (intérimaire) at night. For a full time, witch is 15 nights per months, I earn 1950 euros a month. This salary is what you have after the social taxes are taking of. Means after you have paid for social security which is very good here, because you can be cured or buy medicines for free with your "mutuelle" wich is about 30 euros per month. Plus in that taxes your retirement plan is included too, your job insurance as well. So these are things you don't have to pay for as in USA. Plus the cost for an appartment is lower. I am living by the Méditerrannée, in south of France, and you pay 500 euros per month for a 3 bedroom. It is more expensive in Paris of course, but you can have a better salary there too. You have to know about public and private for the establishment too. "Cliniques" are private and "hopital" are public. Public pays better than private but I don't know if you can be hired if you are not native from France. You have a lot of advantages for retirement, hollidays, and so on...
    Private can be "CCU" (convention collective unique) that is these ones that pay the less. Or "FEHAP", that is non lucrative organisation, that pays almost as well as public, with the 13th month for instance, that you don't have with CCU. It is a little bit complicated, but these are things that makes a difference at the end of the month!
    Sorry I gotta go, I am working tonight! Just let me know if I can help.
    Ciao!!!
    Hello! Cheers for that! I am on nights now too hehehehe
    Working in France sounds complicated. I do want to try though... I have a naggy fiance! It does sound exciting but at the same time, rather frightening.
    The apartment sounds cheap.. I don't mind if it isn't in Paris, I'll commute if I have to. 1950 Euro's not bad huh? And that's after tax? You also mentioned you work as an agency, how did you go on about applying for that? Is it like doing an agency shift in London? Sorry about the 3rd degree!! I need all the info I can get
    Have a good shift!
  8. 0
    Quote from DavidFR
    I've lived and worked in France since 2001.

    To register your qualification here you need to go in person to your local health and social security department (listed in the yellow pages as the DDASS). You must speak fluent French, and if you don't you will be refused registration as an IDE (Infirmier Diplômé d'Etat). People with European Union qualifications have the right to register straight off. You must present your original certificates with a French translation stamped by an official interpreter approved by your embassy. Others often need to work as Aide Soignants (nurses aides, care assistants) while they work for the French qualification.

    Compared to my homeland (the UK) nursing here is paradise. They think they have a crisis, but it's nothing compared to the UK. The public health system here repeatedly comes top of international league tables and it's easy to see why. It's well funded and well resourced. Things such as waiting lists for surgery just don't exist as they do in the UK.

    Everyone in France works a 35 hour week. Holiday entitlements are good (around six weeks plus the 13 public holidays). Pay is not amazing, but you earn enough to live on and the benefits are good (pension, travel allowance etc.) Public hospitals have a reputation for paying better than private clinics, who often skimp to make their profit. The public sector functions in an almost "money no object" fashion, which is beginning to change. Taxes here are high, but you get what you pay for - a good health service, good schools, excellent public transport and civic amenities.

    Most nurses work a fixed shift (mornings, afternoons or nights) with some places having implemented the long day/night (12 hours). Your meal breaks are paid, and many hospitals provide you with a free meal on duty. Very few places have shift rotation between night and day like in the UK. You're usually either a morning nurse, an afternoon nurse or a night nurse. IDE (registered nurse) levels are low but you always have a good number of Aide soignants to support you, and they are trained to a high level - they can generally be trusted to get on with the basic care. The nurses job here is more focused on the technical tasks - drugs, IVs, bloods etc. Nursing here is still very task orientated (something I personally like). Nurses here are very efficient, but perhaps lack the 'personal touch' of anglo-saxon culture. It's a different relationship here - the patient sees you more as a professional and maintains an almost formal respect which I think British patients no longer have.

    In larger cities agency nursing is possible and is well paid. The shortage of nurses here means there is always agency work. Recruitment of foreign nurses is becoming increasingly common.

    Many nurses here set up in their own practices (Infirmiers libérals) You go to these nurses with all your prescptions for things like dresings, injections etc. Practice nurses don't exist and less happens in outpatients than in the UK, so these nurses fulfil that role, as well as providing homecare like the British district nurse.

    If you speak English there are increasingly opprtunities for bi-lingual nurses in international companies and NGO's. There are both an American and a Franco-British hospital just outside Paris catering largely to ex-pats. Bi-lingual posts always pay better, you can really sell your English here, but you must speak good French too.

    Personally, I love life here and would recomend it to anybody. The French, I feel, get an unfairly bad press abroad. Once you penetrate this society you realise what a warm race of people they are. The pace of life here (even in Paris) is slow and civilised. There is a very rich cultural life here and the food and wine of course are unbeatable. Working life is very civilised; due to the socialist cullture and strong unions things are very much weighted in the employees favour. Nursing care here is good; medical standards are high. I would say go for it.
    Wow!
    May I ask you a few questions please?
    I trained and qualified in London and planning to learn / improve on my french!! I can only just about ask for my bill at the moment when I am in France:imbar Do you happen to know whether joining a nursing agency or an actual hospital is as straight forward as it is in London? ie You contact Human resources, they send an application form, interview etc etc?
    What's ex-pats? And lastly, are they still short of nurses there? I plan to work around Paris/outskirts of it.
    Please help! I am grateful for any information you may provide.
    Kind regards.
  9. 0
    Quote from Era
    Hi, have you checked you're in the right category?
    How come I'm getting more than you? I'm grade E ( dunno if top E though as I've been an E grade for a few years!) I suppose the unsocial hours make a massive difference... ? do one night per rota?
    Kind regards
    -x-
    When I was top E working in the hospital I got more than this with enhancements but working as a practice nurse with no enhancements it was roughly this wage £1300 a month. The thing with working as a practice nurse you tend not to get the same annual increament like you do in the hospital til you reach the top of grade. GP's don't have to pay the same as you get in a hospital and I even get less sick time. I have had just 1 rise in 3 yrs but this doe not include the annual pay rise in april that everyone gets. Unsociable enhancements make a lot of difference
  10. 0
    This is a great thread!!!

    So it seems that the easiest way for a US trained nurse to work in France is to first work in the UK. Can anyone say about how long one would have to work in the UK before having the documentation that France wants before letting one work there?

    Also--if any EU county will do, has anyone tried working first in Switzerland? Does Switzerland accept the US nursing degree?


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