Recent ASN grad -- Perfect time to follow my dream and relocate across the country? - page 3

by christophermiles

4,865 Views | 30 Comments

Hello, everyone! Iíve been a long time reader of allnurses.com but this is my first time posting. Iím looking for advice/suggestions. Hereís my story: About three weeks ago I graduated from an ASN program in Indiana, and Iím... Read More


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    Thanks for all the suggestions and comments, everyone. I'm still waiting for my authorization to test, but, whatever I decide, I'll be sure to update this thread.

    Thanks again!
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    I would definitely have a job lined up before you made the move. New grad positions are very limited, and most hospitals will not hire ADN applicants (it's possible though). Your best bet will be to look for jobs in LTC. As far as finding other employment, the job market is still fairly difficult here, though better than much of the rest of the west coast (ie, Southern California, Portland, etc.), which may leave you without any job after the move. I am not sure how the cost of living compares, but it is fairly expensive here. I live about 20 miles north of Seattle and a one bedroom apartment goes for $800 - $1300 per month in this area.

    Also, I would suggest you at least visit before making the move. I moved here from California and have hated Seattle since day one. The weather is constantly miserable (it really does rain all the time, we never see the Sun), and people are very reclusive (probably due to the weather). Google "Seattle freeze" to give you an idea of the people here, they tend to be superficially polite, but not friendly at all. The fashion here is still mainly "grunge"; in actuality it was never a fashion here, it has just always been the way people dress, lots of hiking boots/shoes, fleece, hoddies, and flannel, for both men and women. I'm kinda biased I guess as I hate camping, don't hike, and prefer places like San Diego and New York. But, if you like the outdoors, and don't mind the weather this may be the place for you.

    I have never spent much time in Bellingham, but I have a bunch of friends that went to WSU there, and all of them said they liked it better than Seattle (but all of them ended up back in Seattle for work). Good luck with the choice, let us know what you decide.
    christophermiles likes this.
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    Quote from christophermiles
    Thanks for the comment, PintheD! My goal was to leave with at least $2,000. Do you think that would be sufficient cushion?
    In Seattle? Uh, no. That won't even get you into a cheap apartment (with your deposits and such).
    Quote from WrekDiver
    I would definitely have a job lined up before you made the move. New grad positions are very limited, and most hospitals will not hire ADN applicants (it's possible though). Your best bet will be to look for jobs in LTC. As far as finding other employment, the job market is still fairly difficult here, though better than much of the rest of the west coast (ie, Southern California, Portland, etc.), which may leave you without any job after the move. I am not sure how the cost of living compares, but it is fairly expensive here. I live about 20 miles north of Seattle and a one bedroom apartment goes for $800 - $1300 per month in this area. Also, I would suggest you at least visit before making the move. I moved here from California and have hated Seattle since day one. The weather is constantly miserable (it really does rain all the time, we never see the Sun), and people are very reclusive (probably due to the weather). Google "Seattle freeze" to give you an idea of the people here, they tend to be superficially polite, but not friendly at all. The fashion here is still mainly "grunge"; in actuality it was never a fashion here, it has just always been the way people dress, lots of hiking boots/shoes, fleece, hoddies, and flannel, for both men and women. I'm kinda biased I guess as I hate camping, don't hike, and prefer places like San Diego and New York. But, if you like the outdoors, and don't mind the weather this may be the place for you. .
    I've said this a few times before on this site, but I had absolutely no problems getting a job here in Seattle ith my ADN. I even beat out BSNs (who were locals here with double my nursing experience) To boot, I even received a relocation bonus.That being said, I absolutely LOVE it here!! I've heard soooo many people mention the "Seattle chill" and honestly I've never seen it. Where I came from, this place is a delight, temperment-wise. If people are faking it, then they are doing a great job.The hiking, kayaking, skiing, camping....world class! I hike the nearby mountains every weekend, and in the summers, almost daily. Rain, or shine. Seattle is a wonderful place to live! But $3,000 isn't enough of a cushion. We had more than 10x that much in savings and were still nervous.
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    Quote from CCL RN
    I've said this a few times before on this site, but I had absolutely no problems getting a job here in Seattle ith my ADN. I even beat out BSNs (who were locals here with double my nursing experience) To boot, I even received a relocation bonus.
    I don't doubt it; he is a new grad though.
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    Quote from CCL RN
    I've said this a few times before on this site, but I had absolutely no problems getting a job here in Seattle ith my ADN. I even beat out BSNs (who were locals here with double my nursing experience) To boot, I even received a relocation bonus.
    Then again, you have 6 years of nursing experience, which makes you more marketable and less risky than a new grad in the eyes of employers. In addition, if you graduated from nursing school 6 years ago, this would mean that you graduated into what had been a robust economy with abundant nursing jobs.
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    For those of you currently in the program or recent grads - what have you experienced about getting that first RN job? I keep hearing that hospitals don't want to hire RN's with less than a year experience. Is this reality? Is it easier to get a position in the hospitals you've done your clinicals in? Are there cities/states that have greater need? I'm currently weighing if the cost of the Accelerated Programs are going to be worth it if there are no jobs out there. Any advice is appreciated!
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    i put this question to a colleague in tx with hiring responsibility, and this was her response:

    in my system we will choose a bsn new grad over adn. we typically have way more applicants than we can hire at the new grad level, this is in dfw. we provide a yearlong residency in most areas.

    with an experienced nurse, all things being equal we will choose bsn but if the adn has better competencies we will go with them, though some of my system's hospitals will only hire in bsns no matter the experience. baylor is doing the same. i coach my non-bsn nurses to get their bsn so they have more options. they can stay in their current jobs but if they want to do something else in our system they may be blocked. there are several local schools with online classes supplemented with clinicals which make it easier. we also provide some tuition reimbursement.
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    I work for an organization that hires a lot of ADN and a lot of new grads.

    I will echo what the others have to say about taking a trip out here and seeing what area you would want to live in and see if you can get a job. Our hospital will do over the phone interviews which is nice for those that live out of state.
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    WrekDriver:

    WSU is in Pullman. Pullman is 2 hrs south of Spokane. WWU (Western WA univ) is up north in Bellingham. Bellingham is sort of a quirky hippie town with a flavor all it's own. I can say that since it has been a second home for years.

    OP

    The Seattle area actually has less rain than many parts of the country. Yes..that is true. In fact, it might not rain for weeks. What we do have is almost perpetual overcast in the winter.
    We also in a great location for anything outdoorsy. You can live in Seattle and be an hour or two away from water and snow skiing.



    Clothing: It's Eddie Bauer and North Face for the most part. I haven't seen flannel in ages! Downtown Seattle is a variation of clothing. It's a college town and it's urban. Anything goes.
  10. 0
    Good luck to you!


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