Hospital cancelled my contract!?! - page 2

Okay, so I took my first assignment at John Hopkins in Baltimore and I've been there for three weeks. Well, I travel with another nurse that was contracted with me for 13 weeks on another unit. Well,... Read More

  1. by   Conqueror+
    Quote from StrawberrySwallow
    Don't be afraid. It does seem to happen A LOT at those B-more hospitals...it happened to me, and when my recruiter called me to tell me that my contract had been cancelled, he was very apologetic, but told me that i had to be out of the apt. in 48hours.
    This is why more travelers are getting their own housing. If you've never lost your home and job the same day you don't want to. That's why we're going back on the road in an RV. Cuts all that out.
    Last edit by Conqueror+ on Nov 4, '07 : Reason: sp
  2. by   HeidiSuz
    Unfortunately this crap happens all the time. I once got to a hospital and less than a week later told not to go back. Come to find out the company sold itself out. This week, I have an old discipline which is stupd and brain dead staff not nurses get into it and do not know how to read regulations, make a mess of things too. I was two days on orientation and someone misread my nursing license then decided that they were wealthy bye
  3. by   Natkat
    Quote from StrawberrySwallow
    I would go even as far as bringing in a bag of chocolate for the unit staff that you work with, and trying to be very engaging, and sympathetic with all of the stress that the nurse manager, or house supervisor has to go through! You know, CHOCOLATE IS A GREAT STRESS-RELIEVER FOR NURSES! Offer HER some candy FIRST, when you go to report for your shift!
    best of luck to you!
    Never under estimate the power of chocolate.

    I was having difficulty as a brand new patient care tech at the dialysis facility I work in now. I could tell by everyone's attitude that I was the topic of many gripe sessions and people were getting fed up with me taking so long to catch on.

    I decided to kill them with kindness. One day I came to work with a huge chocolate cake and a thank-you card, telling them that my 'success' in my new job was because of all their help and many years of experience.

    Yeah it was manipulative. Yeah it was bullsh*t. But you know what? It worked! After that, I was in like Flint. I still occasionally buy lunch for everyone to keep the wheels greased.

    At Christmas I buy everyone pizza for lunch one day. I figured out it's cheaper than buying everyone a $10 gift certificate, and they like it better than some useless piece-o-crap that I pick up from the dollar store.

    Chances are they still don't like me that much, but an occasional free lunch makes me easier to tolerate.

    Sometimes the most complex problems have the simplest answer.

    And I know this is off topic, but I have now idea where the chocolate cake discussion is.

    But back to the topic at hand, I'm so glad we're having this discussion. It's something I never thought about and now I know to be aware and be prepared.
  4. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from misscus
    Today after working 7 night shifts, I had my 3 week contract cancelled in Northern Arizona, for 'clinical reasons' of which I was not told what they were, which I only found out from my registry manager after I was sent home to hotel after which I called my manager, who was also dumbfounded over the situation as it had never happened with me before.
    This night, ater arriving for my shift, I was told I was not scheduled on that unit but the clinical manager called staffing and then told me I was cancelled for that night shift, so I smiled and said I would go back to my hotel room and relax for an evening and be ready for tomorrow nights shift. I asked the clinical manager if anything was wrong and she said no. She even took my cell number so she could call me directly if I was to be called off in the future.
    After I got back to my hotel, I phoned my registry manager and learned from him that I supposedly did not do a computerized physical assessment on an admit and also did not do a wound assessment. I was astounded. I admit I was new to the computer charting and if I didn't put an assessment onto the computer system it was purely accidental. The short time I was there I saw numerous unfinished assessments of which I finished out of my strong teamwork skills, usually it was just where a nurse did not assess flu/pnx vac's so I did that and finished them.
    So, I went back to the hotel and packed my truck and left the 7200 foot elevation small town immediately. Drove the 186 miles downhill back to Phoenix. Even though I had the hotel for the night. I was angry and dumbfounded as to what I really did wrong and why I wasn't given the real information and or the opportunity to fix my omission/assessment. I can't even think of what wound assessment I missed after pouring myself over my n to n report papers for the 7 noc shifts. I also know that that last few nightshifts of work there, there were several core staff nurses who were called off for low census or placed on standby. I heard the grumbling but kept to my job. Now I just have to wonder, could it be a bogus 'clinical reason' complaint or just to cancel an over staffed unit's high paid traveler and hotel. I also know that I am quite competent as a nurse and am able to go in and do a good job for all my patients in nearly any tele//M/S unit with little help. I am highly proficient and organized and an IV whiz. 80% of my patients tell me I am the best nurse they have had and they learned more from me about their dx and treatments in the time I am their nurse, and the other 20% are so sick they are unable at that point to see anything but their dilemma/ illness. Understandable.
    Has anyone had this type of experience? This really hit me hard, so I will greatly appreciate any feedback/suppport anyone gives.
    Tonight after getting home I feel a combination of depression and or irritation as I have never had a contract cancelled for a reason such as this. In my short time there I saw where nurses frequently did not do something on the computer were told about it and they were required to 'fix' it. Because I am a traveler/registry, am I not allowed to 'fix' it? Am I supposed to be perfect in all ways? I took this really hard, and am really trying to learn from this experience.
    Any feedback?

    Was this in Flagstaff? That hospital has a super bad rep, and there are been a number of newspaper articles in which nurses have voiced their concerns over terrible working conditions there.
    A good friend of mine did dialysis there. He said it was the worst place he's ever worked. He said a bunch of travelers broke their contracts themselves.
  5. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from Natkat
    Never under estimate the power of chocolate.

    I was having difficulty as a brand new patient care tech at the dialysis facility I work in now. I could tell by everyone's attitude that I was the topic of many gripe sessions and people were getting fed up with me taking so long to catch on.

    I decided to kill them with kindness. One day I came to work with a huge chocolate cake and a thank-you card, telling them that my 'success' in my new job was because of all their help and many years of experience.

    Yeah it was manipulative. Yeah it was bullsh*t. But you know what? It worked! After that, I was in like Flint. I still occasionally buy lunch for everyone to keep the wheels greased.

    At Christmas I buy everyone pizza for lunch one day. I figured out it's cheaper than buying everyone a $10 gift certificate, and they like it better than some useless piece-o-crap that I pick up from the dollar store.

    Chances are they still don't like me that much, but an occasional free lunch makes me easier to tolerate.

    Sometimes the most complex problems have the simplest answer.

    And I know this is off topic, but I have now idea where the chocolate cake discussion is.

    But back to the topic at hand, I'm so glad we're having this discussion. It's something I never thought about and now I know to be aware and be prepared.
    Natkat-

    I'm a traveling dialysis RN and I'm also in TX.
  6. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from Pageantnurse
    After DH worked 51 weeks of a 52 week contract in Philly having never missed a shift or even being late he was fired one week before he was due a 10,000 completion bonus for not sending an extra CNA home and leaving the floor overstaffed on 11-7. Four CNA's for 60 residents was totally uncalled for. The agency didn't back him and was honest by saying. We have 37 nurses on contract there (600 bed facility), we can't jeopardize that for one misdeed. Go figure.

    What a nasty trick. That hospital should be ashamed. Due to hearing stories like this, I now ask to have bonuses rolled into a higher hourly wage.
  7. by   Blue IIs
    I started working in a smaller hospital in NC. My son-in-law was killed in Iraq so I left to be with my daughter. I kept in contact with my recruiter and nurse manager. Originally my contract was to end Dec. 18. I was suppose to start back Oct 1st but the hospital wanted me to be on-call for Christmas. When I told them I needed to be available for my daughter and six month granddaughter but I would extend my contract into January to make up the time, I was told the hospital understood but they were going to cancel my contract. I tried to find out if I was entitled to my travel money because the hospital cancelled the contract but I haven't been able to get any information from the agency. I have since started a new assignment and have basically marked this experience up to another lesson learned and have moved on. I had heard good things about this agency but I won't go back with them.
  8. by   RoxanRN
    As a soon-to-be traveler, I'm loving all these threads!! I do have a question, though.... can I have written into my contract if I have no documented 'discipline' or 'personality' problems (like the 'problems' talked about above) that I will continue to receive pay for the 2 following weeks or until a new assignmnt, whichever is shorter?

    ..... and I like the idea of working the completion bonus into higher wages.
  9. by   Natkat
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    Natkat-

    I'm a traveling dialysis RN and I'm also in TX.
    Hey you!!

    I think we talked an another forum when I asked about how long I have to work before traveling.

    I'm in the Houston area. Are you anwhere near there? I'd love to take you out to lunch or something. Greasin' the wheels and all..

    Just kidding!!! It would just be fun to meet you and talk shop.
  10. by   jlynn325
    I had issues that sounded very similar with American mobile...twice!!
  11. by   KarenGeorgeBSRN
    Good Morning!

    As an Administrative nurse dealing with budgets, and what we all know is cost-effective care for the recipients of nursing care, there is a monetary crisis in the "health care industry" today. Although the nursing shortage remains "critical" there are other variables in play.

    Due to an industry shortage getting professors and clinical instructors for interested "adults" who want to become nursing professionals is almost impossible. Therefore, educating would be nurses is becoming more difficult to do.

    There is not one nurse; new or experienced that does not see "why one of us" would choose travel nursing, or per diem. It is clearly a financial advantage over nursing staff who are dedicated to one facility, and who make far less per hour. In fact many of us who have worked the floor in large university hospitals have seen "travel" come in and get special handling.

    I recall back in 1997 a male travel nurse come into our step/down Telemetry CCU unit at my alma mater. He could not start IV's which all of us had to do up there for we practiced primary nursing. One of our nurse educators worked with him so that he could "start up" and also take simple blood draws. He told her and many of us "I just do not do that and do not want to learn."

    Is anyone here smiling at this picture? After many years of hospitals getting hit due to the demand for nursing with "over budget travel expenses" they are getting sick and tired of paying these high fees out; it makes perfect sense.

    For anyone here who is licensed you have the ability to commit to one facility, dedicate to yourself and your profession by doing so, and become a viable part of a family you work with and grow with. I encourage all to see the benefit of "less is more" in this solution.

    Thanks!

    Karen G.
  12. by   jlynn325
    If you think we do travel nursing just for the "financial advantage" youre crazy. We put up with schedules that are given to us without reguard...schedule changes, sometimes not so nice housing, not knowing who anyone is, doctors or administrators, being lost in new cities. I do it for the experience. I have better skills and knowledge now than ever. I am more outgoing and flexable than ever. You base your judgement on one person who is not willing to learn....and thats sad for you both.
  13. by   jlynn325
    Also, we dont see the money that hospitals "shell out" for us. We dont make that much more. We dont get vacation pay, sick days or even 100% paid benefits. We go sometimes months without seeing our friends and family. So when you get "sick and tired of paying these high fees", just remember what we give up and live without just to help in your staffing crisis!

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