looking for home-based triage position - page 3

Does anybody out there know of any national companies that offer home-based telephone triage positions? I am well-experienced in phone triage but recently moved to an area with no triage jobs. I have one lead--Intellicare in... Read More

  1. 0
    Quote from movealong
    I trained in the St Louis office for about 3 months. Others completed the training process quicker, some longer. Your average length of talk time on a call must be ~10 minutes before you can start working from home. I came from a previous job setting where length of calls was not really monitored, so it was a little hard for me to break old habits.

    Demographics are usually already in the system, we just verify them. But if we can't find a member in the database, then we have to gather the info and load them into the system.

    Intellicare has their own system/software. It's pretty easy to use.

    Keep watching for postions. They just hired a few nurses for nights in the last month.
    Thanks for the information.

    Does Intellicare offer benefits? If so are they available for part time employees?

    You mentioned you work 9 hour shifts. Do they have a range of shifts available? Where I work now we have 6, 8, and 12 hour shifts available.

    Do you know how many contracts (clients) Intellicare has? If it's a large number, do you as a triage nurse have to know the details of all the contracts (such as which dr wants to be called after hours, etc), or do you just work with a limited number?

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  2. 0
    They do let nurses work different amount of hours for their shifts. They do offer benefits (I'm single, so I have to have a job with benefits). I believe they are prorated for part timers. They also use perdiems.

    You must have either DSL or cable for a fast internet connection. I'm thinking of relocating and bringing my job with me, but had to rule out one small town, as they only had dial up.

    They have a large list of clients/contracts ( I forget how many but I think it's more than 100?), and yes, we do have to know for each client whether we page the doctors or not, make appointments etc. When you pull a member from each database to your screeen, a list of "rules" for that specific client is shown. These "rules" will tell you if you need to page an oncall, whether they will refill prescriptions after hours, whether you can book appointments, the hours that office is open, whether the office has weekend hours, and sometimes we even have driving directions listed to tell patients how to get to the office. We have way too many clients to be expected to remember the rules for each on our own. But you know how it is, some clients have more members, and one becomes familiar with that client's rules quicker.

    I've been working at home for almost 1 year now. I love it.
  3. 0
    dear movealong,
    I work there too, do I know you ???
    Last edit by intellicareRN on Jan 23, '05
  4. 0
    It has been a LOOOONG time since I posted here. After reading this post I emailed intellicare. The recruiter replied to my email the next day and Friday we have an INformal conversation set up. Any tips??
  5. 0
    The only thing I can say with your telephone conversation with the recruiter is maybe have your resume in front of you. Just be able to tell what kind of computer skills you have and be personable on the phone and you will do great!!
    Last edit by intellicareRN on Jan 31, '05 : Reason: change title
  6. 0
    Quote from movealong
    They do let nurses work different amount of hours for their shifts. They do offer benefits (I'm single, so I have to have a job with benefits). I believe they are prorated for part timers. They also use perdiems.

    You must have either DSL or cable for a fast internet connection. I'm thinking of relocating and bringing my job with me, but had to rule out one small town, as they only had dial up.

    They have a large list of clients/contracts ( I forget how many but I think it's more than 100?), and yes, we do have to know for each client whether we page the doctors or not, make appointments etc. When you pull a member from each database to your screeen, a list of "rules" for that specific client is shown. These "rules" will tell you if you need to page an oncall, whether they will refill prescriptions after hours, whether you can book appointments, the hours that office is open, whether the office has weekend hours, and sometimes we even have driving directions listed to tell patients how to get to the office. We have way too many clients to be expected to remember the rules for each on our own. But you know how it is, some clients have more members, and one becomes familiar with that client's rules quicker.

    I've been working at home for almost 1 year now. I love it.
    Hi. I just joined this forum today and I have followed your posts regarding home-based phone triage. I live in Southeast Michigan and I am looking for an additional job opportunity that will fit into my busy schedule of 3 boys who play hockey. Currently, I do contract work for insurance agents, providing the physical exams for their applicants. It's very flexible, but inconsistent work. My work background is varied, and I have no phone triage experience, but I did work in an Urgent Care/Emergency Room for 3 years and triage of patients was one of my job responsibilities. I have my BSN and I am a quick typist. How would my previous experience fare for employment in the home-based phone triage business? Your feedback would be greatly appreciated.
  7. 0
    I work for Intellicare, but in the disease management division. I understand it's quite different from triage, but may an option. I've had a long history in home care and this position fit very well for my experience. I am working in a program that deals with CHF and DM pt's. It's home-based, still have to have the DSL or cable hook up, and the hours are more of a day/evening type. So disease management could be an option, too.

    Quote from hockeymom
    Hi. I just joined this forum today and I have followed your posts regarding home-based phone triage. I live in Southeast Michigan and I am looking for an additional job opportunity that will fit into my busy schedule of 3 boys who play hockey. Currently, I do contract work for insurance agents, providing the physical exams for their applicants. It's very flexible, but inconsistent work. My work background is varied, and I have no phone triage experience, but I did work in an Urgent Care/Emergency Room for 3 years and triage of patients was one of my job responsibilities. I have my BSN and I am a quick typist. How would my previous experience fare for employment in the home-based phone triage business? Your feedback would be greatly appreciated.
  8. 0
    Quote from SWRN84
    I work for Intellicare, but in the disease management division. I understand it's quite different from triage, but may an option. I've had a long history in home care and this position fit very well for my experience. I am working in a program that deals with CHF and DM pt's. It's home-based, still have to have the DSL or cable hook up, and the hours are more of a day/evening type. So disease management could be an option, too.
    Thanks for the response. How did you get into disease management and how long have you worked there? Does it matter where the employee lives when working in disease management? Is this a type of case management? Sorry for all the questions, but I am intrigued by the position. Thanks.
  9. 0
    I am a new employee for the company. I'm going into my second month. I found the job really by accident...stumbled across an internet ad in November. I spoke with the recruiter at that time for a triage position but they weren't hiring. They waited until the spring to do another hiring for disease management and it really seems to fit my experience. I've been working in home care for the last 18 years, so the experience I had helped. No, it doesn't seem to matter where you live. As long as you have high speed internet, either cable or DSL....that's a requirement. And you have to be able to train in one of the call centers for 2 weeks full time. I trained in the St. Louis office and we had a nurse from West Virginia in our group. There are several call centers located across the US.....St.Louis, Dallas (I think), Maryland, Maine, and Nebraska....I think there are a couple more but I don't know that for sure. I have never worked case management, but I believe this differs in that we monitor their CHF/DM electronically/telephonically, and relay other major concerns, ie financial, social, barriers to care, to their case managers.
    Hope that helps.

    Quote from hockeymom
    Thanks for the response. How did you get into disease management and how long have you worked there? Does it matter where the employee lives when working in disease management? Is this a type of case management? Sorry for all the questions, but I am intrigued by the position. Thanks.
  10. 0
    regarding the clients demographics..from experience most is preloaded but you must be very careful due to confidentiality issues. when i worked nurse line it was stressed that we were not to ask the caller to varify information that was on the screen but to ask the demographics from the caller. i liked the job but had some problems with unfair treatment with scheduling. i worked with one nurse that had been there 7 yrs. and was still slow and not confident with her recommendations. i worked with one that was slow on the key board and often put in her home remedies or herbal etc. which were not approved in the guidelines, so they both were slow and i was able to get my calls done in less than 8 minutes average within a couple of months and then down to 5 mins and less and felt confident with my decisions regarding recommendations. not that i am so great but telephone triage nursing was perfect for me. i would love to have my old job back but i wasn't willing to carry the load for my coworkers at the expense of not getting a better schedule that i felt i deserved based on my performance. i had to leave home at 4:30 am and drive 50 minutes that got old after 18months. everyone was given an opportunity to have their schedule changed with a chance of getting one of your preferred choices. of course i didn't get one of mine because i needed to "carry" the other nurses. most of the people were "wonderful" and of course their was always the occasional "no heart terminator sup's) any how a triage nurse needs to be able to adapt to changes and to deal with disaster issues, emergencies, abuse, think fast, stay focussed,ask the right questions and stick to the guidelines. i spent all my free time "learning". would love to have a job from home with one of the triage nurse lines. if anyone knows of one let me know. i have not worked for several months now just looking for something i want to do. certainly not long term, home health or hospital.



    Quote from movealong
    i trained in the st louis office for about 3 months. others completed the training process quicker, some longer. your average length of talk time on a call must be ~10 minutes before you can start working from home. i came from a previous job setting where length of calls was not really monitored, so it was a little hard for me to break old habits.

    demographics are usually already in the system, we just verify them. but if we can't find a member in the database, then we have to gather the info and load them into the system.

    intellicare has their own system/software. it's pretty easy to use.

    keep watching for postions. they just hired a few nurses for nights in the last month.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top