Is CRNA School as Difficult as People Said? - page 4

Hey everyone (posting this here too because I want current students to answer as well), I consider myself to have above average intelligence and did fairly well in college (a top 20 private... Read More

  1. by   Stormy8
    I'll be starting school next fall and i'm soooo excited!!! To be honest, I'm also nervous. Failure is not an option. Period. Chemistry is not my strong suit. Anyone have any advice?
  2. by   nurseman78
    I am in my third semester. Don't sweat it. We had one test which had some organic chem review, but it wasn't bad. Just review organic compounds, the different alkyl groups, the difference between amides, amines, carbonic acids, ketones. I found the lecture for the material to be very good at explaining it, it wasn't bad. Where are you going to school? It's a very exciting time, LOTS of work but doable and a very cool profession. I feel that the hardest part of school isn't the studying, it's the personalities of the preceptors.

    Overall, just take CRNA school one bit at at time. Don't worry about boards or clinicals or finals, just take it one day, one lecture, one page at a time. Don't compare yourself to others, don't worry about what others think of you, and you will do great.
  3. by   Stormy8
    Thank you for the encouragement. I truly appreciate it!
  4. by   Guest12/09/15
    I'm 25 years old and in my first year of a front loaded program. It's going just fine. It's do-able. I see my family, boyfriend, and friends on the weekend. Then, I am in class all day and study during the weekdays. I hit the gym too. It all works out.

    I haven't started clinical yet, but I hear it'll consume my entire life. I'm enjoying didactics though.

    You put the time and effort in, you get the results.

    We have a small class of 8 people, and we all help each other make study guides.

    For now, I'll just cherish my sleep while I can before clinicals start after next semester.

    Btw, I'm unemployed to focus on school and took out loans for living expenses. 5 of us quit our jobs for school. 3 of us are trying to work per diem.
  5. by   Gmare
    Hi, I know this is an old post, but what school did you go to- for CRNA?
  6. by   dianearc
    Quote from SRNA4U
    I have been accepted into an integrated program and this is my preference over a front-loaded program. I have worked with students in a front-loaded program and they said when they start clinicals, it makes it hard to remember the info from didactics because in didactics, you basically study to test and then you move on to the next area of what you need to study.SOme students said you may get OB lecture in the Fall but when you start clinicals, you may not get OB clinicals unto a year or so later and by that time, many of the students had forogotten the information. They said it made the program much more harder.

    In the blended program, what you get in lecture, you will start putting to practice in clinicals early on. Students in the integrated program are much more confortable in the OR early on the process compared to front-loaded program students. The thing I like about my program is students start clinicals 3 months after the program starts and it's only 1 day a week and each semester the clinical days increase by 1 additional day while the classroom portion tends to decline. While the front-loaded students could quote a lot of information early on, they didn't have the hands on experience to demonstrate what they know. So while students in both programs may voice inadequacies about where they are in their learning experience, towards the end of the program, everyone is on the same page. I'm a hands on person and I rather do an integrated program. My program does not have students going to clinicals and having lecture on the same day. Our lecture and clinicals are separated on dedicated days. I have seen some inegrated programs in Florida that have students in clinical for 8 hours during the day and then about 7pm, they come to class for their didactics until 10pm. Which is insane. Our school makes sures clinical days and lecture days are separate. We have 24 clinical sites and we have a 100% pssing rate on boards for the last 3 years, which is pretty good.
    This comes late but out of curiosity. Which program did you attend? State? I'd like to consider an integrated program like that one
  7. by   ICUman
    Quote from dianearc
    This comes late but out of curiosity. Which program did you attend? State? I'd like to consider an integrated program like that one
    Drexel University. Checked out past posts.
  8. by   dianearc
    Quote from ICUman
    Drexel University. Checked out past posts.
    Thank you!
  9. by   JMurse89
    Quote from SRNA4U
    I have been accepted into an integrated program and this is my preference over a front-loaded program. I have worked with students in a front-loaded program and they said when they start clinicals, it makes it hard to remember the info from didactics because in didactics, you basically study to test and then you move on to the next area of what you need to study.SOme students said you may get OB lecture in the Fall but when you start clinicals, you may not get OB clinicals unto a year or so later and by that time, many of the students had forogotten the information. They said it made the program much more harder.
    Your integrated program must have perfected the system because the students I talked to here were having difficulty. Their lectures don't at all line up with what they're doing in the OR. But they are the first class, as it's a brand new program so hopefully in time they will be better able to integrate lectures with rotations. I know clinical sites are scarce here in AZ so I could see it being difficult.

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