PMHNP programs all going from MSN to DNP? PMHNP programs all going from MSN to DNP? - pg.3 | allnurses

PMHNP programs all going from MSN to DNP? - page 3

Hi, FIU's PMHNP program recently came off moratorium for their PMHNP program--however, they apparently are changing from a master's degree program in 2013 to a BSN-DNP program in 2014! Is this... Read More

  1. Visit  Goldenfox profile page
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    Quote from xenogenetic
    The director of my NP program told me that at this moment, the DNP demand is not there and that she knows of several schools that had tried going DNP only and had to offer the MSN again because they had DNP faculty that was commanding salaries but there was a lack of students. In fact, and sadly, the program switched gears and is marketing the MSN program to neighboring states (i.e. RI) as well as starting a PA program in 2016 instead of pouring resources trying to force the DNP program.

    You missed the irony of my post. Its not so much about existing demand, but about creating demand for NP education---which ultimately further diminishes the NP profession in terms of opportunities and pay. Think about it. With so many NP schools increasingly putting out new grads---many of whom are already having a tough time finding work---what does the future look like with a glut of grads who all have an MSN degree and no actual NP experience?

    That future is already here. Don't just take my word for it. Look and ask around. Having a DNP may make a difference in some cases since it does (even if only in a small way) differentiate a candidate from an ocean of other applicants who all have the same master's degrees and no experience. If I were to truly describe it for what's really happening it might be too frightening and discouraging to some people, so let the reader use discernment.

    I also believe that what your school is experiencing isn't so much a lack of DNP students but the beginning of an overall lack of NP students, period. Many are simply opting out of the DNP because they can. It was inevitable that this would happen with so many online NP schools popping up all over the place, there simply aren't enough students to spread out among all these schools. What I think will eventually happen is that more and more NP schools will begin to either offer fewer spots, or close altogether when it is no longer financially viable for them to keep the gig going. Fewer students will be enrolling in NP programs once they realize that the job market for new NPs is not as rosy as the ads make it seem.
  2. Visit  traumaRUs profile page
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    Moved to student NP forum
  3. Visit  xenogenetic profile page
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    Quote from Goldenfox
    You missed the irony of my post. Its not so much about existing demand, but about creating demand for NP education---which ultimately further diminishes the NP profession in terms of opportunities and pay. Think about it. With so many NP schools increasingly putting out new grads---many of whom are already having a tough time finding work---what does the future look like with a glut of grads who all have an MSN degree and no actual NP experience?

    That future is already here. Don't just take my word for it. Look and ask around. Having a DNP may make a difference in some cases since it does (even if only in a small way) differentiate a candidate from an ocean of other applicants who all have the same master's degrees and no experience. If I were to truly describe it for what's really happening it might be too frightening and discouraging to some people, so let the reader use discernment.

    I also believe that what your school is experiencing isn't so much a lack of DNP students but the beginning of an overall lack of NP students, period. Many are simply opting out of the DNP because they can. It was inevitable that this would happen with so many online NP schools popping up all over the place, there simply aren't enough students to spread out among all these schools. What I think will eventually happen is that more and more NP schools will begin to either offer fewer spots, or close altogether when it is no longer financially viable for them to keep the gig going. Fewer students will be enrolling in NP programs once they realize that the job market for new NPs is not as rosy as the ads make it seem.
    Yes, you make an excellent point. Following in line with your point, the question comes up of which universities will be willing to take the financial hit to their program in the beginning to cause that bottleneck and force everyone down the DNP track? My school has 74 students enrolled in the psych NP program, and only 7 in the DNP program. I remember 10 years ago when they said LPNs would be extinct by today, yet walk into any nursing home and you will find them. ADN RNs were next on the soon to be extinct list, yet they are still around. I think economics will keep MSN programs around for at least another 20 years if the economics remain the same. The only large interventions that I can forsee with regards to stemming the current supply of MSN NPs is if states buckle down on creating minimum passing rates that would include holding for profit MSN programs to those standards. Then again, I am not knowledgeable in the area of if the for profits produce poorer performing board testing graduates.

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