Neonatal NP??

  1. 0
    I just started NP school but have determined I wish for my focus to be on Neonatal. Are there any NNPs out there that can offer any advice or tips? I will have to finish NP school and then go for my specialty. School suggestions? I looked into UMKC as I live in MO but I want to hear from those that have completed their NNP specialty. I feel this is where I am meant to be and truly want to make a difference in these families lives.

    Thanks so much
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  3. 12 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    Quote from jesbowne
    I just started NP school but have determined I wish for my focus to be on Neonatal. Are there any NNPs out there that can offer any advice or tips? I will have to finish NP school and then go for my specialty. School suggestions? I looked into UMKC as I live in MO but I want to hear from those that have completed their NNP specialty. I feel this is where I am meant to be and truly want to make a difference in these families lives. Thanks so much
    you can do a NNP program no need to get a FNP then go back to get NNP
    elkpark likes this.
  5. 0
    All of the schools I've found so far say you must have had at least one year experience in NICU before applying....I don't. I also am considering Women's Health so decided to start with FNP and proceed from there. THanks for the input though
  6. 1
    [QUOTE="jesbowne;7747726"]All of the schools I've found so far say you must have had at least one year experience in NICU before applying....I don't. I also am considering Women's Health so decided to start with FNP and proceed from there. THanks for the input though[/QUOTEso you will go get a years experience in the NICU then go back and get your NNP
    elkpark likes this.
  7. 0
    In order to be board certified, you must have at least 2 years of NICU experience...and I don't know of a single school that doesn't require NICU experience to go into a NNP program...I compiled a list a few years ago when I was applying myself.
  8. 0
    Quote from babyRN.
    In order to be board certified, you must have at least 2 years of NICU experience...and I don't know of a single school that doesn't require NICU experience to go into a NNP program...I compiled a list a few years ago when I was applying myself.
    The eligibility requirements listed on the National Certification Corporation include current licensure as an RN and successful completion of an approved program. There is no mention of any specific clinical experience for entry into the program.

    Also, I am aware of at least one school that does not require NICU experience. East Carolina University requires “…the equivalent of 1 year of full-time, recent (within the last 5 years) practice experience as a registered nurse (RN) in the care of critically ill newborns, infants, or children in an acute care, inpatient setting….” Having said that, it is likely that an applicant without NICU experience will have a difficult time successfully completing an NNP program.
  9. 0
    NCC has done away with the 2 years of NICU experience within the last few years. Most programs however have not changed their admissions requirement. Also, the National Association for Neonatal Nurse Practitioners (NANNP) recommends, "Appropriate RN experience in the care of critically ill newborns, infants, or children is essential prior to beginning the clinical component of an NNP program." Bear in mind this is a recommendation from a professional organization and not a requirement. I have heard of student being accepted into an NNP program contingent upon them working in a NICU while attending classes. I doubt this is very common though as it would be incredibly difficult to adjust to a new clinical environment while successful completing grad coursework.
  10. 0
    Quote from chare
    The eligibility requirements listed on the National Certification Corporation include current licensure as an RN and successful completion of an approved program. There is no mention of any specific clinical experience for entry into the program.

    Also, I am aware of at least one school that does not require NICU experience. East Carolina University requires “…the equivalent of 1 year of full-time, recent (within the last 5 years) practice experience as a registered nurse (RN) in the care of critically ill newborns, infants, or children in an acute care, inpatient setting….” Having said that, it is likely that an applicant without NICU experience will have a difficult time successfully completing an NNP program.
    I've heard rumors that NCC was going to do away with the requirement, but didn't know they actually did it. That's too bad...American nurses aren't trained as NICU nurses, they are trained as adult nurses with a smattering of pediatrics thrown in. I basically had to unlearn most of my adult training when I went into NICU right down to what a normal heart rate is...luckily I never had to take care of adults as a RN, but it was overwhelming even still...

    I went over to the East Carolina website where the next sentence actually says, "NICU RN experience is limited to Level III experience or higher only" which implies to me that they would accept someone with PICU experience that also takes on sick infants (smaller community hospitals do this). I highly doubt that they would take someone with just PICU experience and no experience at all with neonates.
  11. 0
    There is no longer an experience requirement for neonatal NCC certification or admission to most programs. IMHO this is an unfortunate change. My advice would be that if you want to be an NNP, don't waste any time or money on an FNP. FIRST however, get a job as a NICU RN and make sure it's what you want to do. Have you ever worked with neonates? Fully understand the role of the NNP? Most people have no idea what I do on a daily basis, which consists of a full night, weekend and holiday rotation, along with a 100% inpatient role.

    In any case, get some experience under your belt with neonates, even if it's a year while getting your prereqs done or all during school like I did. Take it from me, I had 3 full years of level III NICU experience as an RN before starting NNP school, got an additional 3 years while working FT in school, and it was the most valuable part of my education. I would've been so lost and useless without it.
  12. 0
    See, this is what the problem is for me though. I would LOVE to go back to school for NNP. But I can not get hired in NICU without NICU experience. I have been applying for 7 years. I know that I should have NICU experience before going back for NNP. But I am forced to keep caring for adults until someone will hire me for NICU. It sounds really easy for all to recommend here "get NICU experience first". But a lot of us are trying, and can not get hired.


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