Is grad school really this hard to get into? - page 3

by itsnowbegun 61,865 Views | 71 Comments

Greetings! Soooo after Georgetown kept haunting me to apply, I ended up not getting accepted. Waiting on Univ of Cincinnati (online) acceptance., I never knew graduate school would be this hard to get into. I never had issues... Read More


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    As one writer said, RODP is a viable option. Here in Tennessee, we need nurses. To facilitate the process, our state adopted RODP, Regents Online Degree Program. When you apply to RODP, you are not applying for one particular school (although you can identify your school of choice) you are really applying to SIX universities! That's right...SIX!

    Think of RODP as a clearing house for students. Students submit their applications to RODP, and, if they meet the requirements, each student is assigned to a "home school" such as Tennessee Tech. University (Cookeville) Middle Tennessee State University (Murfreesboro), Tennessee State University (Nashville) etc., etc. These participating colleges require the same curriculum, same costs; everything is uniformed to ensure each student receives the same education at the same cost. IT IS WONDERFUL! So once you meet the requirements, RODP rotates (one student to TTU, next to MTSU, etc) and each student is placed in a college. I know of NO ONE who has been denied admission to a college (IF they meet the stated requirements) through RODP. With that being said, please note I said THROUGH RODP, many are denied who apply directly to the college themselves. You may not be assigned the college of your choice, but everyone I know gets assigned to a college. Regardless of what school you are assigned, it doesn't really matter. You do not travel to that school at all (atleast I didn't). You arrange your own clinicals, you find your own personal preceptors all in your local area. I drove to Murfreesboro twice; once to meet my counselor (not required) and the second time to GRADUATE from the bachelor's program! LOLOL. (Note: RODP is a program available for BSN and APN degrees).

    Lastly, our state also offers scholarships for students seeking graduate degrees who (1). Are majoring in Nursing education (we are in dire need of nursing instructors) 2. Students who agree to teach Nursing part-time (such as from your computer, in the evening, distance courses). This is through TSAC. The award is for $7,000.00 PER YEAR for full-time students and pro-rated for part-time. You simply must agree to teach for a specified amount of time for the monies to be "free and clear". Also, important to note; Tennessee is offering LOAN FORGIVENESS. In a nutshell, your education costs while attending school will be paid for you if you employ as a full-time educator.

    I hope ALL of you will look to Tennessee for your graduate needs! Since the change of financial aid (NO subsidized loans for graduate students after this summer semester) Tennessee's RODP really has MUCH to offer! I was able to obtain medical insurance through my college, making it possible to work less.

    I was assigned to MTSU and the experience, for the bachelor program, was ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL! My counselor became my friend and helped me through many trying times, all via online student relationship only. She didn't know what I looked like yet was consistently available within minutes for any questions or concerns I had.


    CHECK OUT RODP!! You will be GLAD you did!
    Last edit by julielive on May 15, '12 : Reason: rewording
    Grneyzrn, rgbrn, serenitylove14, and 1 other like this.
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    Applying to grad schools can be intense; getting rejection letters is worse! I'm going to Georgetown and was through their daunting admission process. Not that it's much consolation, but if the admissions coordinator encouraged you to apply and walked you through the process, he (or she) must have thought you had a good shot at being admitted. They don't have a crystal ball and have no idea what the committee will actually say, but they don't waste their time with people who clearly won't be accepted. So, you should realize that you were probably very close to a positive response from them.

    I know that most universities want their own forms filled out, but you might go to those who you're asking to recommend you to write a generic letter that covers all the bases. Negotiate with the admissions department that you will have the references submitted upon preliminary acceptance. In other words, "here are my letters of recommendation; I can't ask these people to write 4 or 5 individual letters or forms because I'm applying to several programs. If you look at these letters and the rest of my application, can you tell give me preliminary acceptance? At that point, I'll have the recommenders fill out your form and you can make your final decision based on those references." I did exactly this and only one school refused. The others did accept me based on the letters written, and only one actually came back and wanted my recommenders to fill out their specific form (but by then I was already accepted at G-town). It's flattering to be asked to write a letter, but it can become cumbersome.

    Good luck!
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    Thanks everyone! This is exactly the kind of things I need to hear. I appreciate the ideas and different ways to going about becoming a NP. Will keep everyone posted and looking to hear from you all as well!
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    Thank you for chiming in on my behalf Tinabeanrn. Bvwatts I am looking into other schools and have applied at one and in the process of applying to frontier too. Crossing fingers and praying. Also got a message from the admissions person I was working with at G-town, but havent been able to get back in touch with her since. Perhaps she will calll me back on Monday.
    Tinabeanrn likes this.
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    Quote from itsnowbegun
    Thanks everyone! This is exactly the kind of things I need to hear. I appreciate the ideas and different ways to going about becoming a NP. Will keep everyone posted and looking to hear from you all as well!
    Good luck! If you don't get in on the first go around, try again. NP programs are just getting more and more competitive. I start at UC San Francisco next month and we had a 12% acceptance rate this year. If it doesn't work this year, maybe try applying more broadly next time?
    CCRNDiva and Tinabeanrn like this.
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    Look at Walden U's new program.
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    I applied to three schools for FNP. St. Josephs in Maine. I received a denial letter in the mail stating they had large volume of applicants and were not going to be accepting any more applications until next year. I applied close to the deadline for that entry and I wasn't completely surprised. I also applied to Maryville University and was accepted to the online program last week to start August 27th. I am still waiting for a response from UofC as well. My application was complete and submitted on 3/27. They told me to expect it to take 12 weeks so I am not at the 12 week mark yet, this is the tenth week. I would like to have the option to choose, but I am very happy to be accepted at Maryville. I had a 3.1 GPA undergrad. They require no GRE. They took my generic letters of recommendation I had already had copies of, unlike UofC which made me send there electronic forms in. I am anxious to see if I get in, but from what I read on here with other people with high GPAs and more experience than me ( 1.5 years in skilled nursing facility) being rejected. Also I saw other people being excepted for 2013 and with me already accepted for an Aug start at Maryville I will choose to start there with the sooner date. I wish there were graduates or people who are actually in there program on here to give me an idea of both of the programs. I cannot find anything like that and I would love to read a review. I am nervous to find my own preceptor, but I will work on it in the first year in hopes that I will get ahead of the game. Good Luck and I hope we hear something soon!
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    When we post comments to message boards our writing quality isn't on par with what we submit to admissions committees. That said, the grammatical errors, mis-spellings, and awkward choice of words on virtually every post on this thread may give a hint as to the reasons for the rejections. No, we don't put forth our best efforts on this board, but the quality of writing here is a reflection of our capabilities. Every school requires an essay. The point of those essays is to determine how well an applicant communicates. Schools look at more than GPAs, GREs, and experience; they also focus on written and verbal communication skills. Most nursing programs don't offer true writing classes (they stress technical writing and proper referencing). This is an enormous disservice to their graduates who never learn to write clearly and without glaring errors. To those struggling to gain acceptance in a grad program, enrolling in a rigorous writing class may greatly improve their chances. I see this as one of the biggest failures of nursing schools and programs. Graduates shouldn't need to take writing classes to improve their skills; they should have gained those skills in nursing school. But, when faced with multiple rejection letters, enrolling in a writing class may be the key to success.
    Gator Girl 2000 and CherylRNBSN like this.
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    @Snow: What did your volunteer activities and GRE look like? (If you don't mind me asking)
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    I got accepted at UC graduate program for FNP(screaming) yaaaaaaaaaaaaay!!!!!! OMG it was the longest 13 weeks of my life. Hahaha. I hope to hear good news from others as well. Thanks again everyone for your feedback and words of encouragement and advice!
    mmmlaugh, OCRN3, serenitylove14, and 9 others like this.


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