Acute vs. Primary Care NP? Can't decide Acute vs. Primary Care NP? Can't decide - pg.2 | allnurses

Acute vs. Primary Care NP? Can't decide - page 2

For about a year I've been working as a RN on a 30-bed med/surg unit (post renal transplant and orthopedic) in an urban 926-bed Trauma 1 hospital. I'm interested in going back to school to get my... Read More

  1. Visit  tubbywumbkins profile page
    #13 0
    So what did you decide? I'm in exactly the same boat (except I have 6 yrs of med/surge experience) and have no idea which program to choose!?! I'm also interested in working in specialty clinic in next 10 yrs.
  2. Visit  Rocknurse profile page
    #14 0
    I chose ACNP because I've only ever worked in the hospital setting and I have worked mainly in ICU or acute care areas. I absolutely did not want to work with children so I didn't want to do FNP for that reason. A friend of mine did the same program as me and she works for a cardiology practice where she rounds in the hospital some days and others works in their office a few miles down the road. That's the kind of area I think would suit me when I graduate. I would also quite like to work in emergency medicine but I would not want to work with kids so that kinds of puts me off a bit. When I worked in the ED I worked in a department that had a separate children's ED so only adults came into my area. Would be nice to find another place like that. I just like hospitals I guess...I feel comfortable in that environment, although I could so without the weekends and holidays thing. Ideally I'd find some kind of practice or urgent car unit that was closed weekends and holidays or had infrequent call. We'll see.
  3. Visit  Neuro Guy NP profile page
    #15 5
    Not sure about that one.... My ACNP program was a solid three years long (fall, spring, and summer semesters). I've not seen the programs be any shorter. That being said I'm so aggravated that people are content with saying FNP can do it all. It is a primary care based education, and IMO on the job training does not replace education. It is a supplement to a foundation received in school. I'm not saying FNPs are incompetent in acute care, but let's face the reality people. The reality is now that if you definitely want to do acute care, you probably should pursue the ACNP path. Let's all realize too that ACNPs are NOT confined to the hospital. We can and do work in outpatient settings.
  4. Visit  BostonFNP profile page
    #16 2
    Quote from Neuro Guy NP
    Not sure about that one.... My ACNP program was a solid three years long (fall, spring, and summer semesters). I've not seen the programs be any shorter. That being said I'm so aggravated that people are content with saying FNP can do it all. It is a primary care based education, and IMO on the job training does not replace education. It is a supplement to a foundation received in school. I'm not saying FNPs are incompetent in acute care, but let's face the reality people. The reality is now that if you definitely want to do acute care, you probably should pursue the ACNP path. Let's all realize too that ACNPs are NOT confined to the hospital. We can and do work in outpatient settings.

    I am not sure I understand correctly, are you saying that FNPs shouldn't work inpatient but it's ok in the same vein for ACNPs to work outpatient? Isn't that arguing both sides of the same issue?

    For many years physicians have been the gold standard of care; they are generalist educated and, for all intents and purposes, learn on the job to be specialists. This is very similar to NPs, though NPs are afforded the opportunity to specialize in their education prior to practice and have flexibility after they are in practice.

    In an ideal world, ACNPs would cover hospitals along with hospitalist/intensvist MD/DOs conterparts. FNP/ANP/PNPs would work outpatient with their IM/FM/Pedi counterparts. I think, in the real world, there is room for both to overlap, especially with experience. Speciality practice further blurs those lines as there is a primary and a tertiary overlap in that practice alone.
  5. Visit  Neuro Guy NP profile page
    #17 3
    No I'm not dating FNP should not work inpatient. They should in some circumstances, as in if the PCP they quirk with also sees hospital patients or perhaps as part of hospitalist team but not as an intensivist. The education doesn't back that up.

    It is ok for ACNP to do a lot of outpatient, but not primary care. When I say outpatient i mean specialty outpatient practice, such as CV, pulmonary, GI, ENT, endocrinology, etc. because our education DOES include that aspect of outpatient practice. It even says so in the AAACN's position statement. We do inpatient and outpatient as long as outpatient does not include primary care.

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