What do you like about being a research nurse? - page 4

by AwayWeGo | 62,021 Views | 39 Comments

I would like to hear from some research nurses as to what they like about being a research nurse? Do you find clinical trials interesting? Is this area of nursing rewarding to you? Thanks! :)... Read More


  1. 0
    Hello everyone,

    I am also interested in becoming a research nurse. Right now i'm a new grad RN with a prior BA in biochem in which I have some research experience within the university. My long term goal is to either become a geriatrics NP or nurse researcher...so I'm just applying to every job that fits either of the two.. Is this a good idea or will it make me even more confused on what career path I want to take? And as far as becoming a research nurse, I am applying to Nurse Research positions but I was wondering if I should apply to Research Assistant positions as well in case I don't get the Nurse Research positions? I was thinking that the research assistant position will give me experience in medical research and make me a stronger candidate for a future nurse research positions but i'm an RN, will I be wasting my RN by being a research assistant for a year or two? I guess I really don't know what the best thing to do here is. Please help :/
  2. 0
    Quote from Panda30
    Hello everyone,

    I am also interested in becoming a research nurse. Right now i'm a new grad RN with a prior BA in biochem in which I have some research experience within the university. My long term goal is to either become a geriatrics NP or nurse researcher...so I'm just applying to every job that fits either of the two.. Is this a good idea or will it make me even more confused on what career path I want to take? And as far as becoming a research nurse, I am applying to Nurse Research positions but I was wondering if I should apply to Research Assistant positions as well in case I don't get the Nurse Research positions? I was thinking that the research assistant position will give me experience in medical research and make me a stronger candidate for a future nurse research positions but i'm an RN, will I be wasting my RN by being a research assistant for a year or two? I guess I really don't know what the best thing to do here is. Please help :/
    Do you have any established nursing skills? If not then you should get them 1st before taking a research assistant job. If so then it might be a good way to get your foot in the door.
  3. 0
    Quote from CrunchRN
    Do you have any established nursing skills? If not then you should get them 1st before taking a research assistant job. If so then it might be a good way to get your foot in the door.
    I second this - my research director told me that nurses were innately good as research coordinators because we already know how to talk to patients. I use my floor nursing skills every day on the job, and my experience was critically important to being offered the position.
  4. 0
    For those of you already doing this, what are some tips on keeping everything organized and how to not forget anything especially when handling multiple studies at once? I just started a new position as a research nurse and would love some insight. Any other tips on how to be succesful in this role would be greatly appreciated!
  5. 0
    We have our own mapped drive with all the studies on it. Any of our staff can access the drive. The study folder has all the current studies (the older ones are archived in a different folder). Each study has all the related documentation i.e. informed consent forms, source documents, etc.

    It can quickly become overwhelming with multiple studies. We use a database to track study patients and it automatically tells us who is ready for follow-up (and helps us avoid repeat study enrollments). I like to use Google Calendar with different calendars for each study. You can change the color of them, etc.

    Of course there's always the hard copies, obviously clearly labelled and organized binders and file folders are the only decent way to deal with that. And for stuff that I still need to use, I love my bulletin board, it takes up nearly half the wall

    HTH!
  6. 1
    Yes, we utilize google calendar as well. Our group manages about 18 different studies. When we enroll a new patient, we go through and add all pertinent dates (and what needs to be done or samples collected on those dates) into our shared calendar. Then each Friday, someone prints out the calendar for the following week so we can see who is due for what, when. Also, we have report sheets that we pass around remotely (it's stored on a secured shared drive that everyone has access to), and that lists all the patients, and ones that have something coming up in the next day or two gets highlighted.
    flyingchange likes this.
  7. 0
    I've decided I'm going into research nursing, (I like bedside, but I don't feel 'wired' for it). I hope it shouldn't be too difficult in my area as a new grad with research experience. Thanks for all the advice- I've applied to several CRC positions at several universities, so I'll see what happens! Do y'all recommend also trying to get something at bedside as well to keep up clinical skills?
  8. 2
    I think I have the best of both world as a Solid Organ Transplant Research Nurse. I worked for 10 years in various Research positions (Office Manger in Research facility, Oncology Research Board Pre-Reviewer, Research Assistant, Research Coordinator) in various fields (Mental Health, Oncology, Stem cell) before I got my RN. I knew I wanted to stay in Research, but as mentioned in a previous post....its hard as a new RN to fine tune all your hands-on nursing skills as a Research Nurse. This is where I was extremely lucky to find my current position. As a Transplant Research Nurse I work in the clinic, OR and on the Hospital floor performing various nursing skills for our research protocols. As this patient populations receives various types of intensive treatment with infusions and oral medications during and after transplant. I have been able to fine tune many of my RN skills. Although, I am always excited to start a new protocol that will require me the opportunity to fine tune another skill. I have looked into becoming a CRA. I feel I have a lot to offer with my vast knowledge from various professional research experiences. However, losing the direct patient care contact is what has kept me from every applying every time! I'm too new of a Nurse, it's still new and exciting to me......maybe once I'm burnt out ( I hear that happens), I'll move on to being a CRA. Universities are a great place to start with Research Nursing. They usually will have a variety of positions that you could qualify for and even though some are lower on the tier, your RN will help you be compensated at the high end of the pay scale. Research Nursing is defiantly one of the better paying positions for a nurse that would still like to have direct patient contact. It also has a lot of other great opportunities to expand your career (i.e. assisting on protocol development and writing=publications and notoriety in your field, being on the from line of exciting new treatments, and the rewarding feeling after an investigational product you worked with is approved by the FDA and available to the entire U.S.). I'm not going to lie, the job is very challenging at times coordinating multiple protocols and patients, and can be some very long hours some days. It is worth every minute to me Good luck to all of those RN's out there trying to succeed in a very rewording field!
    jameese and Crux1024 like this.
  9. 0
    I have been doing research for 15 years & love it.
    The hours, the relationship you build with patients on long term trials. The mix of clinical and admin.

    If are any Registered Nurses in Sydney Australia with good computer skills interested in part time regular hours (office hours) on set days and would like to explore the idea of clinical research nursing, we are just the place for you.

    Feel free to send me your CV
    retina@eye.usyd.edu.au

    Have a great day!
    md9999
  10. 0
    HEy. I know this is an old thread but would love to get some input. I have 10 years previous research experience. BA Chemistry MPH in Community Healthy. I have been accepted to both an ADN and BSN program. I am torn on which to choose. The ADN is 4 semesters and roughly costs $6k. The BSN is 6 semesters and will roughly be $19k. After doing the math even if I did a RN BSN bridge I'd still come out cheaper. Does the fact that I have prior research experience and degrees come into play when applying for jobs or are ADNs simply not hired. In general, the nursing climate in my area is fairly ADN friendly if that makes a difference.


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