What is the real difference between ASN and BSN??? - page 2

by 2amigos 13,846 Views | 10 Comments

I know that the BSN is a four year degree. Here in New Mexico, you have to be a RN for one year before the colleges will accept you into the BSN program. I am currently taking classes to get into the RN program at our Community... Read More


  1. 0
    I have an idea or two to throw your way. Bear with me, please. I enjoy being a student. I remember thinking that I'd love to be a professional student, except that I wouldn't be able to support myself with it. Then I attended nursing school & acquired my BSN. Mind you, I already had a B.A. In English at that, with a minor in German. I took my prereqs, no problem. I was workin' full-time, takin' 17 hours & lovin' it. I pulled a 3.8 that semester. I had a 3.6 the following semester. Then I started my nursing classes. We lost 30% of the class in the first semester. I did fairly well & pulled a C out of that class. My grades improved over the following 3 semesters, but never reached as high as when I was taking my prerequisites. It positively wore me out, even with reducing my work hours to 30 per week.

    After I graduated, the thought of additional education became repulsive to me. I had absolutely no desire to go for my MSN & become an FNP as I'd dreamed of doing before. It's now been 8 years since I graduated and I'm finally looking at starting grad school. If I'd just gone for the ADN instead of BSN, I wouldn't have been eligible for my current position.

    These days I wish I'd just gone for the bridge program at Vanderbilt & gotten the MSN instead of going for the lower-cost option. I'd be finished with grad school & not looking at trying to parent, work, and go to school all while being the best wife possible AND be active in my church .

    Think about it. And, hey, I'm not judging anyone on their choices or opinions. This is just a point of view from where I sit.

    Have a blessed day, ya'll
    Joy


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