RN vs. BSN - page 3

by mmarqua4 153,664 Views | 64 Comments

I am wondering what the differences in RN and BSN are. I am in the process of deciding to get my RN or go all out and get my BSN. Is there a big difference in pay for BSN, or do (small towns) just want nurses, not depending on... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from farmer jane
    this lowly adn nurse is very, very tempted to correct the hideous spelling and grammar in the post above. really, if you're going to write a post about how your knowledge is superior and how you want to change the future of nursing, please consider how your present yourself when using the written word.
    i never said "our" knowledge was superior. i was explaining the education is quite different and should be expected. yes, my spelling was quite awful in my post although my point was clear. it is my "opinion" receiving a bsn is not only empowering for the individual, it brings more power to the profession of nursing. instead of the finger pointing and fighting about which degree is better, why not spend the time researching a solution to the problem of lack of colleagueship as well as professional autonomy. one major difference i have noticed both in practice and especially viewing posts on this message board is a level of professionalism.

    i chose a bsn program for the very reason you criticized me. i wanted a nursing education. my education has afforded many opportunities including licensure for the state board of nursing. i have tutored pathophysiology, pharmacology, nlcex review courses, as well has held leadership positions at both the national and state level. i have been involved in legislation, resolution writing, and evidenced based practice policy implementation. throughout the process i grew into a scholarly writer and future nursing leader. yes, i thought about attending a local community college to receive an adn which would have given me the same license as my peers. the choice to attend a 4 year program changed my life, practice and the way i view “our” profession. i have the greatest amount of respect for well seasoned adn’s. i have learned from experienced nurses with many levels of education. however my peers who graduated with me from programs with less than 4 years of education have noted the significant difference in the education. i believe this should not be a debate of education versus experience it should be a dialogue of education and professional empowerment.
  2. 0
    I took a long 'round about way to get to my BSN. I started out right out of high school getting my BA in biology. Then later I went back to school for my ASN. Worked as a RN for more than a decade before going back for my BSN. My plan is to use my BSN as a stepping stone to my MSN in education. I will be 41 when I graduate with my BSN while working full time. I also hope that the BSN will open more doors while earning my MSN. The ASN had worked for me over the years but some positions have been denied to me simply because of the lack of BSN, even with the BA already earned. I encourage students to go for their BSN if nothing else to increase their options in the workforce.
  3. 0
    I'm glad Canada changed their entry to practice requirement to BScN in 2005. Nobody is able to argue over this anymore. We still have diploma RNs who have been grandfathered into the system and encouraged to go back, but it really cuts down on a lot of this "who is better than who" crap. We now simply have ONE avenue to take to become an RN, and ONE avenue to take to be an LPN (with the exception of Quebec).

    Also, I think in today's world - students entering the nursing profession should be degree prepared - it most definitely adds to the professionalism of the profession itself, I don't care what anyone says. With the patient acuity nowadays, RNs play a much larger role in the care of individuals than ever before, and the role continues to evolve. With this comes the need for more education!

    I totally understand many people who don't have the time nor money to invest in a BScN - but if you take a look at Canada, many programs are popping up now that take 2-3 years (same timeframe as an ADN in the USA) for a baccalaureate degree. I would not be surprised to see many more of these types of programs popping up over the country in the near future either.

    If nursing wants to truly move forward, and really gain the credit/respect it deserves - streamlining practice at the degree level is a perfect way to start that process. Many older nurses in Canada might disagree, but it's working well here I think, and there is a lot less disrespect for our fellow nurses as well

    Just my 2 cents. I am proud to be a BScN, RN
  4. 0
    The argument between the time it takes one to get their ADN vs BSN is a mood point. People say, it only takes 2 years to get a ADN but it take 4 years to get a BSN. This is not true, both degree's take the same amount of time if you include all the pre-reqs.

    Here in AZ where there was such a nursing shortage it didn't matter if you had a BSN or ADN, once you finished school and took your boards you had a job. Times have changed, many of new grads (mostly ADNs) can not find a job. But BSNs are not they are being hired over ADN new grad nurses.

    I'm happy I have my BSN, it has opened more doors then if I had my ADN, but of course this is a regional requirement.


    Quote from tk0224
    I'm glad Canada changed their entry to practice requirement to BScN in 2005. Nobody is able to argue over this anymore. We still have diploma RNs who have been grandfathered into the system and encouraged to go back, but it really cuts down on a lot of this "who is better than who" crap. We now simply have ONE avenue to take to become an RN, and ONE avenue to take to be an LPN (with the exception of Quebec).

    Also, I think in today's world - students entering the nursing profession should be degree prepared - it most definitely adds to the professionalism of the profession itself, I don't care what anyone says. With the patient acuity nowadays, RNs play a much larger role in the care of individuals than ever before, and the role continues to evolve. With this comes the need for more education!

    I totally understand many people who don't have the time nor money to invest in a BScN - but if you take a look at Canada, many programs are popping up now that take 2-3 years (same timeframe as an ADN in the USA) for a baccalaureate degree. I would not be surprised to see many more of these types of programs popping up over the country in the near future either.

    If nursing wants to truly move forward, and really gain the credit/respect it deserves - streamlining practice at the degree level is a perfect way to start that process. Many older nurses in Canada might disagree, but it's working well here I think, and there is a lot less disrespect for our fellow nurses as well

    Just my 2 cents. I am proud to be a BScN, RN
  5. 0
    Even though I am an ASN nurse with a BA in a related field, I am glad that a BSN is becoming the standard of entry level nursing. I believe it is what the profession of nursing needs to legitimize itself once and for all.

    If I had to do it over again, I would have gone for my BSN, but probably after obtaining my ADN and then working and letting a hospital help me pay for a BSN. I'm reaching retirement age now and do not regret my path, but I've certainly met a lot of ADN RNs in my career who needed a broader education. I think the ADN of today is considered the LPN of the past.

    As an aside, however, it's been my experience that a lot of medical schools are becoming easier, and some of the med school grads I interact with seem like highly educated physician assistants. Go figure.
  6. 0
    I live in the St. Louis area and from what i can see some hospitals prefer BSN but that doesn't mean you can't find a job with only your ADN. I am getting my RN, i have a friend who just graduated with her BSN. She has $50,000 in student loans and i will have no debt when i graduate, and starting pay is about the same ADN-$20.00/hr BSN-$20.50. Is 50 cents an hour more really worth $50,000 in loans plus interest? I didn't think so. Yes, BSN are first in line for promotions and can manage a floor, but if your a new grad, its not like you'll be doing that anyway right out of college. Plus if you want your BSN a lot of the time you can get the hospital to pay for it. From what i've seen the #1 thing hospitals look for is experience! Yes, if a new grad RN and BSN apply for the same job the BSN will probably get it. But if an RN with 2 years experience applies for a job vs a new BSN the RN will get it. But nurses are needed so bad that probably both will get a job! I'd say if you have plenty of money to put toward your education, go for the BSN. If not get your ADN.
  7. 0
    There are ways of getting your student loan paid for and continue to work and make great money. Have your friend look into www.IHS.GOV She will have to work for them for 2 years, but they will pay up to $40K of her student loans off, if she stays longer the more they will pay them off. I know many people who have done this and the pay is usually better then most acute care hospitals.

    BTW, having a BSN does more then just getting one into management...

    Quote from STLCCSTUDENT
    I live in the St. Louis area and from what i can see some hospitals prefer BSN but that doesn't mean you can't find a job with only your ADN. I am getting my RN, i have a friend who just graduated with her BSN. She has $50,000 in student loans and i will have no debt when i graduate, and starting pay is about the same ADN-$20.00/hr BSN-$20.50. Is 50 cents an hour more really worth $50,000 in loans plus interest? I didn't think so. Yes, BSN are first in line for promotions and can manage a floor, but if your a new grad, its not like you'll be doing that anyway right out of college. Plus if you want your BSN a lot of the time you can get the hospital to pay for it. From what i've seen the #1 thing hospitals look for is experience! Yes, if a new grad RN and BSN apply for the same job the BSN will probably get it. But if an RN with 2 years experience applies for a job vs a new BSN the RN will get it. But nurses are needed so bad that probably both will get a job! I'd say if you have plenty of money to put toward your education, go for the BSN. If not get your ADN.
  8. 0
    More and More university's are offering Master's Entry Program in Nursing (MEPN) for people who have an undergrad in another discipline but wants to get into nursing. This is going to change nursing for the better.

    Quote from katmeup7
    Even though I am an ASN nurse with a BA in a related field, I am glad that a BSN is becoming the standard of entry level nursing. I believe it is what the profession of nursing needs to legitimize itself once and for all.

    If I had to do it over again, I would have gone for my BSN, but probably after obtaining my ADN and then working and letting a hospital help me pay for a BSN. I'm reaching retirement age now and do not regret my path, but I've certainly met a lot of ADN RNs in my career who needed a broader education. I think the ADN of today is considered the LPN of the past.

    As an aside, however, it's been my experience that a lot of medical schools are becoming easier, and some of the med school grads I interact with seem like highly educated physician assistants. Go figure.
  9. 0
    Im not saying it doesn't open more doors then that. But for a new nurse a lot of the benefits of having your BSN won't make much of a difference until you have some experience. My friend actually already looked into that. The problem is she's now on maternity leave because she got married and is having her first child so she can't work for a while. So now she's basically stuck with these loans and just accumulating interest. I don't know where your from but in St. Louis hospitals seem to be A LOT more willing to help pay for your higher degree then to do any type of loan forgiveness.
  10. 0
    When it comes to an education its a very personal thing, some people look at an undergrad as an accomplishment and a goal for them, no one can say getting a BSN or ADN is a right or wrong, however with the way nursing is slowly heading, to the BSN being the preferred degree.

    So if many of the hospitals are willing to pay off loans then its not an issue now is it? If your friend wants to go back to school and get her MSN, DnP she is one step closer then someone who doesn't have a BSN. Also if she wants to teach clinical's down the road she can do that with a BSN, something ADN's can not do.

    Quote from STLCCSTUDENT
    Im not saying it doesn't open more doors then that. But for a new nurse a lot of the benefits of having your BSN won't make much of a difference until you have some experience. My friend actually already looked into that. The problem is she's now on maternity leave because she got married and is having her first child so she can't work for a while. So now she's basically stuck with these loans and just accumulating interest. I don't know where your from but in St. Louis hospitals seem to be A LOT more willing to help pay for your higher degree then to do any type of loan forgiveness.


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