RN-BSN or RN-MSN?

  1. 0 I am all lined up to begin a 5-semester ADN program in the Spring. I know I want to eventually be an advanced practice RN. I also have a bachelors degree, not in nursing (this is a second career for me). I am thinking about applying to an Accelerated BSN program, also 16 months to begin in Spring, but if I don't do that, and stick with plan A (which is finish the ADN and get my RN), would I want to do an RN-BSN program? I looked at the curriculum, and it looks like between the nursing classes I will take in the ADN program and the general education classes I have from undergrad, I will alreadly have all the credits...? Would I really be looking at a RN-MSN program? What are the chances of these still being around in two years from now? Thanks in advance for any advice!
  2. Visit  rnstudentcharleston profile page

    About rnstudentcharleston

    Joined Apr '12; Posts: 24; Likes: 10.

    5 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  bcandygurl profile page
    0
    I'm in exactly the same boat except my ADN program is the traditional two years. I am anxious to start in the Fall. It seems like there are 4 core classes everyone has to take in order to get the BSN regardless of whether you have a previous degree or not. I plan on doing RN to MSN if the programs are still available so I don't have to go through the stress of reapplying for school and also you don't have to worry about repeating core classes that are replaced with graduate classes. Look forward to hearing other opinions though.
    Quote from rnstudentcharleston
    I am all lined up to begin a 5-semester ADN program in the Spring. I know I want to eventually be an advanced practice RN. I also have a bachelors degree, not in nursing (this is a second career for me). I am thinking about applying to an Accelerated BSN program, also 16 months to begin in Spring, but if I don't do that, and stick with plan A (which is finish the ADN and get my RN), would I want to do an RN-BSN program? I looked at the curriculum, and it looks like between the nursing classes I will take in the ADN program and the general education classes I have from undergrad, I will alreadly have all the credits...? Would I really be looking at a RN-MSN program? What are the chances of these still being around in two years from now? Thanks in advance for any advice!
  4. Visit  Katie71275 profile page
    0
    I am in an ADN program now and graduate May 2013. I am hoping to do the RN-MSN option(CNM). I also have a previous BA, Sociology, so I think that helps
  5. Visit  Camwill profile page
    0
    Yup I am doing the dual program at my school. After you finish your asn you go to the bsn-msn. That was one of the reasons I choose my school. Good luck I am sure it will work out for you!
  6. Visit  talitha cumi profile page
    1
    @ rnstudentcharleston - It really depends on what you want for your career. If a Master's degree is in your future aspirations, then by all means pursue Rn-MSN. Less time, probably cost less overall than when done separate at the same institute. If you do not plan on pursuing graduate studies then maybe RN-BSN option is favorable.

    I completed ADN this past March and for many weeks toyed with RN-BSN or RN-MSN? After much evaluation I have decidedto pursue RN-MSN instead. I want to be a Family Nurse Practitioner so why not go straight in instead of long round about way. I am still evaluating schools offering RN-MSN. In addition to evaluating programs I am also looking at what States the schools are in, my flexibility for a potential move and timing, cost and financial windfall. Sometimes you just gotta find what you want in life and take a big leap of faith - thats just what I intend to do.

    All the best on your endeavors.
    Last edit by talitha cumi on Jul 26, '12 : Reason: spelling
    bcandygurl likes this.
  7. Visit  HouTx profile page
    0
    I don't know if this is an important factor, but there are an increasing number of hospital nursing jobs that require MSN now. Pretty much all management jobs and specialty-director jobs such as Quality, infection control, risk management, Education, etc. Larger organizations expect Chief nurses to be doctorally prepared.


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