prev bachelor grads: what was deciding factor?

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    adn vs vs absn vs bsn vs emsn?

    i'm torn btwn adn and emsn. pros and cons to each. i'm hoping to read something that will sway my opinion one way or the other.

    why did you choose as you did? and if you could do it over would you do it the same way again?
    Last edit by neenja on Oct 3, '07
  2. 6 Comments so far...

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    I had a BA and actually started in nursing as an LPN. I didn't want to invest a lot more time and $$ just to find out I didn't want to do that, either.

    I almost immediately got my ADN and said I'd never go back. (ADN was faster than BSN). I did of course eat those words, got a BSN and MN and am contemplating a DNP.

    This was a good route for me, but not necessarily for anyone else. A lot depends on your age, life situation, and so forth.
    neenja likes this.
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    I haven't started my program yet, and am choosing a Master's entry because that's what's geographically/financially feasible right now. It seems like the most direct path after my BA in Bio and I'm 27, so don't want to sit too long. Plus you take a year minimum to work as an RN before proceeding in your specialty, so I don't feel you're pushed through too quickly to gain any real know-how.

    That said, I do have some worries about employer preference for initial jobs. I called up one of the big local hospitals I'd like to work at eventually, and asked about their preference between ADN vs. "Bachelor's plus RN". They said they have hired some direct entry folks who've worked out fine, but they really prefer BSN because in addition to the general liberal arts curriculum, which I have and I'm sure you do too, they assume BSN comes with leadership and management training. Now, I would think one could just take those classes separately, or that work experience (I've managed staff in several jobs) could equate. But sigh, they do like to have people fit into their mold.

    The HR woman did mention that this probably doesn't matter once you get to an NP level. And I also know that a lot of people offer tuition reimbursement, so if you choose to continue as an RN you could probably do an online RN-BSN and get it funded. Probably entails a lot of repetition of lit/sociology/psych type courses, but at least you're not paying for it.
    neenja likes this.
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    I chose a ADN program to get my RN because ADN's enjoy a wide variety of job opportunities at a nice middle income. Plus it was very affordable (back then it was $27.00/hour and I paid cash) and the only school in the town I was living.

    16 years later I recieved by BSN so that as I age in nursing I can enjoy opportunities away from the bedside.

    I'm not sure what your other abbreviations mean like "emsn".
    neenja likes this.
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    I chose the direct-entry master's route because:

    1) Finances - with a previous BA it was easier to get loans as a grad student, including enough to cover living expenses... not possible with the ADN or traditional BSN programs
    2) Availabiity - at the time this was the only real accelerated option in my area (an ABSN program was in the process, but it had no reputation and is a private school, so $$$)
    3) Career plans - I would like to teach eventually, which means I need an MS; I am also taking core graduate nursing courses so I won't need to take them later if I go on later for NP/CNM/etc. (I'm in a generalist program now)
    neenja likes this.
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    Quote from arciedee
    I chose the direct-entry master's route because:

    1) Finances - with a previous BA it was easier to get loans as a grad student, including enough to cover living expenses... not possible with the ADN or traditional BSN programs
    2) Availabiity - at the time this was the only real accelerated option in my area (an ABSN program was in the process, but it had no reputation and is a private school, so $$$)
    3) Career plans - I would like to teach eventually, which means I need an MS; I am also taking core graduate nursing courses so I won't need to take them later if I go on later for NP/CNM/etc. (I'm in a generalist program now)


    Ditto here!
    neenja likes this.
  8. 1
    Quote from neenja
    adn vs vs absn vs bsn vs emsn?

    i'm torn btwn adn and emsn. pros and cons to each. i'm hoping to read something that will sway my opinion one way or the other.

    why did you choose as you did? and if you could do it over would you do it the same way again?
    I did the ASN route out of necessity. I couldn't afford to quit my full time job since I have no other source of income. The only local master's entry program is at a private college ($$$$$) and so a loan would not cover tuition and my living expenses. Fortunately, one of the community colleges has an evening weekend program. It was like working and going to school 7 days a week, but you do what you have to do.

    Now that I'm licensed, I can work 3 days/week, get some tuition assistance from the hospital, and take online classes for a BSN/MSN. I'm unsure at this point if I want to go into advanced practice, research, or management, so I think this option was good for me. I don't have any healthcare experience, so this gives me time to get my feet wet and figure out which direction I want for my nursing future.
    neenja likes this.


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