Job market- ADN students being warned? - page 8

by hope3456 26,762 Views | 81 Comments

Ok so I oriented a 4th semester nursing student from the local community college last week and this was for her "trends" class. I work in a state facility for DD population. We got to talking and she of course wants to work in... Read More


  1. 0
    Interesting how some posters are so outspoken how it is not the school's responsibility to warn students about the job market yet many students stated that they were given info regarding it. With there being so much media hype on the "nursing shortage" I just HOPE potential students come across allnurses.com.
  2. 0
    Here's the thing: Nursing is becoming just like any college major, that is besides the desire to enter the profession potential nursing students need to do what everyone else should do; research the field in terms of potential employment, growth and where the jobs are likely to be. People also need to examine their own selves to determine if they are suited to where the profession is headed and can they cope with those demands/changes.

    Here in NYC the marathon only begins with getting into and graduating from a nursing program. Again as with most other college majors the next leg of that run involves "selling" yourself to potential employers. That means making the case as to why they should hire you over the numerous other applicants with similar or better backgrounds.

    The nature of providing healthcare/nursing services is changing. In many areas of the USA this is leading to hospitals closing and or mergers. Each time that happends there are several hundred seasoned nurses of all levels of experience out looking for another gig. In the past several years NYC has lost about ten (give or take) hospitals and now it looks like another (Long Island College) is going. Then there are the rumors about Manhattan Ear, Eye, and Throat Hospital. That isn't even the end of things as it still leaves several hospitals in Brooklyn in various levels of financial straits and sooner or later some are going to close or have to merge.

    Against this backdrop local nursing programs continue to churn out grads every six to twelve months. Where all these new nurses are supposed to go is anyone's guess.

    Oh and here's another thing: if you look at the most recent Department of Labour employment report there are some telling numbers. While healthcare is still one of the few areas to see continued hiring demand, the numbers of UAPs/techs out numbers professional and vocational nurses. The trend of facilities replacing high cost nurses with aides and techs is not slowing, but actually growing and makes up the bulk of the predicted demand for future healthcare hiring .

    Potential ADN students should inquire of any program they are considering about where recent grads have been hired. A general "at many local facilities" shouldn't do because that can mean anything from a clinic to ICU unit. They should also speak with as many working nurses as they can lay hands on to see what local hospitals are hiring. While no one can predict what will happen three or so years out, if you hear that several large healthcare networks have written policies stating they will only hire BSN prepared nurses and so forth, it it well worth rethinking going for an ADN.
  3. 0
    The other key thing that potential ADN students need to insure about: does the school have an agreement or partnership with a BSN program. This is becoming more popular in my area. The school I teach at has one currently in place, and two more in the works. Students who are accepted to that program are dually enrolled, they are guaranteed a seat in the BSN program. That actually begin to take the upper level classes (chem, stats, etc) before they finish the ADN. When they finish the AD, they take NCLEX, and can actually say to an employer "I am enrolled in a BSN program", not 'I plan on getting it' (which was acceptable when I graduated.

    Any ADN program that wants to survive is likely looking into these partnerships.
  4. 0
    [QUOTE=ProfRN4;7237639

    Any ADN program that wants to survive is likely looking into these partnerships.[/QUOTE]

    *** OR, the "BSN required" fad will disapear as we have seen it do in the past. I suspect if the economy ever takes off many of the silly nursing fads like Magnet, scripting, BSN required, DNP "requirment" will go away.
  5. 4
    Or it won't.
    Nurse_Diane, besaangel, carolinapooh, and 1 other like this.
  6. 0
    @PMFB-RN- where'd that quote come from? (Not from me!)
  7. 3
    I doubt the BSN 'fad' will die out, to me personally it makes sense the demand more education since our nurses are the front lines of our healthcare. Other healthcare careers already demand higher education to practice so it makes sense for nursing to follow suit since we're more involved with hands on patient care.

    To honest I don't see any of those things as fads; they are simply signs that our healthcare system is changing and we need to keep up. I want a nurse that's motivated to better him/herself with continuing education courses, getting board certified, or getting higher degrees because it indicates to me that they care about the practice they have. Eventually I think BSN will be the minimum required to practice; it might not happen for decades but that seems to be the direction our healthcare is moving.
  8. 1
    Quote from ProfRN4
    The other key thing that potential ADN students need to insure about: does the school have an agreement or partnership with a BSN program. This is becoming more popular in my area. The school I teach at has one currently in place, and two more in the works. Students who are accepted to that program are dually enrolled, they are guaranteed a seat in the BSN program. That actually begin to take the upper level classes (chem, stats, etc) before they finish the ADN. When they finish the AD, they take NCLEX, and can actually say to an employer "I am enrolled in a BSN program", not 'I plan on getting it' (which was acceptable when I graduated.

    Any ADN program that wants to survive is likely looking into these partnerships.
    Yep, my ADN program has an agreement with almost every BSN school in the state that all the credits will transfer. They are also looking into actively partnering with one of the schools in the area. However, around here it's still fairly easy for an ADN grad to secure a job.
    NeoNurse2Be likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from ProfRN4
    The other key thing that potential ADN students need to insure about: does the school have an agreement or partnership with a BSN program. This is becoming more popular in my area. The school I teach at has one currently in place, and two more in the works. Students who are accepted to that program are dually enrolled, they are guaranteed a seat in the BSN program. That actually begin to take the upper level classes (chem, stats, etc) before they finish the ADN. When they finish the AD, they take NCLEX, and can actually say to an employer "I am enrolled in a BSN program", not 'I plan on getting it' (which was acceptable when I graduated.

    Any ADN program that wants to survive is likely looking into these partnerships.
    *** One problem I see with such partnerships is it can leave some grads between a rock and a hard place. Not elligable for positions in nurse residency programs that require a BSN when they graduate. then when they complete their BSN they won't be elligable for those same residencies since they have been RNs for two or so years and the program only takes new grads. I have known a few nurses in that exact position.
    One wanted to avoid taking NCLEX until after earning her BSN to avoid being in this position, but the RN to BSN program required her to have an RN license to apply.
  10. 0
    @PMFB-RN What state are you located in if you don't mind me asking?


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