Frustrated in BSN program - page 7

by JZ_RN

12,649 Views | 128 Comments

So I am tired of getting treated like an ignorant, useless nurse because I only have an ADN and denied employment everywhere because I'm not a BSN. I get into a BSN program and start taking EXPENSIVE classes, on my own dime, and... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from Ntheboat2;704448
    [LIST
    [*][*]an associate degree or diploma from an accredited RN program, and a baccalaureate degree in a non-nursing field[/LIST]The fact that you must have a baccalaureate degree in another field is a tiny little detail you didn't mention.
    *** It's irrelevent. We are being told by the advocates of BSN only that a BSN should be the entry to RN practice. ADN + bachelors in another field apperently will not suffice, it's the BSN that is all important we are told. Either the school requires a BSN for admission to it's MSN program or it doesn't. In the case UW doesn't, evidence that, despite what we have been hearing, maybe thye BSN isn't as important as we are being told.
  2. 3
    Quote from JZ_RN
    So I am tired of getting treated like an ignorant, useless nurse because I only have an ADN and denied employment everywhere because I'm not a BSN. I get into a BSN program and start taking EXPENSIVE classes, on my own dime, and spending all my free time on these classes. I haven't learned one single thing in the program besides how to do citations for a paper which helps me 0% in my job. I won't get a raise when I have a BSN either. So what is the point? I want to stop taking these classes after this course, but I want a bachelor's if only for my own pride. However, it is costing me so much money (thousands, every class has hundreds in books and fees and then they want you to buy case studies and other crazy things weekly) and all of my free time. I am so stressed doing these busywork assignments (and that's all they are, they don't teach me anything I don't already know and almost none of it is applicable in the real world because there's no time for me to evaluate patient's emotional roadblocks to learning when I barely have time to take their vitals)and I am so tired that at work daily.. and have no time with friends or family. Any advice? Sorry for the rambling but I am too tired to edit.
    I had many of the same feelings as you when I bridged from my RN program into a BSN program approximately 17 years ago. The cost; the commute; the demands on my family; the jumping through hoops; the instructors who played games. But I believed then, and now many years later I still believe, that a BSN would be increasingly necessary for a nursing career, and especially for graduate school, and I wanted all options open to me. I was also fresh from my RN training and years of college, so continuing to study at college level was not hard. I resented the busywork, but there were some courses that were definitely very valuable, and continue to be for me: College statistics (the most interesting and useful course I took in my entire college education) - once you have taken statistics it is a lot harder for people to fool you or lie to you with talk of statistics and correlations; public health; community health (which I did at a nurse managed facility); the preceptorship in a completely new specialty; even writing a research paper. There were some instructors who were very supportive and who I really learned a lot from i.e. the advanced health assessment class, and I remember them with appreciation today. Possibly I gained more doing the BSN directly after my ADN program, and maybe if I had years of experience working as an RN before I bridged to the BSN program I would have found it less useful. I believed that I should make the most of the opportunity to get my BSN as soon as I could, and not put it off, and I am glad I did it that way as I would hate to be trying to go back for it now. Life moves on quickly and shortly after completing it major changes happened in my life, where trying to fit college in would not have been an option.

    I would suggest persevering with the BSN if at all possible, before higher tuition costs and family/life demands make it more difficult to consider. At the very least you will have more opportunities and more job security as a nurse, and will have opened the door to graduate education.
    Last edit by Susie2310 on Nov 24, '12
    subee, nurse671, and JZ_RN like this.
  3. 3
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    I'm not sure why it's acceptable (although really it's only acceptable on this forum) to tell people that their bachelor's degrees are "useless, fluff, a waste of time, etc," but it's just APPALLING ...if...after twisting words, putting them under a microscope, and taking them out of context....someone believes that people with associate's degrees were somehow insulted.
    *** I haven't observed anyone telling another person their degree is useless or fluff. I have only seen people say that about their own degrees. My degree is useless and was absolutly full of fluff and I belive it was a waste of time (unless I get fired, then I suppose it might come in handy). Origionaly I got the degree to advance of the clinical ladder. Just before I recieved the degree I was advanced to the next level, the level that requires a BSN with an education waiver. The people who promoted me had no idea I was in a BSN program. I am not saying that about YOUR degree. If your BSN was your entry to RN practice then it seems pretty darn useful to me.
    Lets remeber it's not the ADN RNs attempting to do away with the BSN RN. It's the BSN prepared attempting to do away with the ADN RN. Understandable they would feel a little defensive.
    redhead_NURSE98!, tokmom, and JZ_RN like this.
  4. 0
    Quote from MunoRN
    She's looking to follow her BF to the University of Washington, the top ranked Nursing school for the past 27 years.
    I have a friend and co worker doing the RN-BSN at the U of W and she is thinking it's a total waste of time. She said she isn't learning anything that she didn't learn in her ADN program. However, being a new grad means she has years of working ahead of her. She is wise to get the BSN now versus later.
    It did surprise me to hear how 'easy' the coursework is. I expected a challenging program from the U of W.
  5. 2
    Quote from wooh
    Not to mention everyone who got a BSN was LOST when they got onto the floor.
    And heaven forbid you got good grades too, because we all know no one is more clueless with the patients than a BSN student with a high GPA!

    To the OP- have you looked in to other programs? I know they vary in cost as well as general format. It seems like if you want to work in a hospital without relocating, you need the BSN, but maybe there's a more cost effective way to do it? The push to buy extra study materials is a bit of a red flag to me- are you going to a for-profit school?
    Anoetos and wooh like this.
  6. 1
    Quote from hiddencatRN
    And heaven forbid you got good grades too, because we all know no one is more clueless with the patients than a BSN student with a high GPA!

    To the OP- have you looked in to other programs? I know they vary in cost as well as general format. It seems like if you want to work in a hospital without relocating, you need the BSN, but maybe there's a more cost effective way to do it? The push to buy extra study materials is a bit of a red flag to me- are you going to a for-profit school?
    Of course! I'm sure if we were to take a poll using random participants, we would see that nobody would want a nurse with a higher education who graduated at the top of their class caring for them and/or their family members in the hospital!
    wooh likes this.
  7. 3
    Quote from hiddencatRN
    To the OP- have you looked in to other programs? I know they vary in cost as well as general format.
    I agree on other programs. I know of two state schools near me that offer bridge programs that are priced reasonably. One respected, one VERY respected. I think there are a couple others as well, but haven't researched much as I'm not in the market.

    And I understand it's frustrating doing something you think is useless. It's how I feel every year figuring out how I'm going to satisfy my career ladder requirements. But trying to have a better attitude about it really might help. If you try to have an open mind, you might actually learn something out of the time you're spending on it. Even if it is "just fluff." There's nothing to be gained out of insisting you won't learn anything and doing your best to prove that you won't other than more bitterness and resentment.
    tokmom, nursel56, and hiddencatRN like this.
  8. 0
    My rn-bsn program is also ridiculously easy. I have even had projects that I had done for my adn required again in this program. I feel that the school knows we work as nurses and if we pay the money and do the motions we will get the degree. I will quit school for a while after my bsn (i have a 4yr old and a newborn) but will eventually go for crna or np so I figure I will just get it done now. On the plus side....its easier and less time consuming than my adn program!
  9. 0
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    I think all ADN programs require anatomy and physiology I and II, but I don't know of any (although I'm sure they exist) that require pathophysiology.

    My BSN program required pathophysiology but I don't know if I'd even consider that "loads."
    Are you actually serious with this? You need to check your facts....the ADN is four semesters of nothing but pathophysiology, while the ADN to BSN is nothing but research based, no additional pathophysiology or even actual hospital clinical hours, atleast none of the ones in my area. The clnical hours for the ADN to BSN are all community/research based.

    And I don't think, I know, that ADN programs require A&P I and II so that the nurses will understand what the instructors are trying to teach them when they are accepted into the nursing program.
  10. 0
    Quote from Pets to People
    You need to check your facts....the ADN is four semesters of nothing but pathophysiology
    Are you serious with THIS? As I already stated, I know plenty of ADN programs that don't require pathophysiology as a COURSE. Then, I provided a link to this forum where several ADN students say they aren't required to take patho and in some cases pharmacology. Furthermore, the difference in courses is one of the very important reasons MANY people choose the ADN program, or in some cases are forced into it after failing.

    It's not a big mystery or even a matter of opinion. Most colleges, both community and university, have a list of course requirements online which is viewable by the public.

    Furthermore, I don't say "i KNOW" anything when talking about something as huge as every educational institution on the planet....because here on this lovely forum...someone will find some online program that's based out of argentina and launched yesterday to prove what you KNOW as wrong.


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