Diploma Nurses - page 3

by Wsmith16

Any info on this would be helpful. My situation is that I have a BS in Communications. I've applied to several nursing schools and got in to 3 but they are a few hours away. Now their is this one school who happens to not be... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from WannaBmaleRN
    Does holding a hospital diploma make you less competitive when applying to a RN to BSN program? Not to hijack the thread, but I'm reaching a point where I need to decide which route to take.
    It MIGHT. In fact - and someone correct me if I'm wrong - there are BSN programs that do not recognize diploma nurses. That may be a consideration when trying to decide what program you'd like to enter. Call up your chosen/potential BSN programs and ask them directly.
  2. 0
    Quote from carolinapooh
    I know where you go to school. You're about three minutes from my house - and that's in rush hour traffic!

    Yes, it is the oldest. Mine is the second. How cool is that? (BTW, Rex actually had the first school in the state in 1895; shame it's no longer around. I'm a sucker for history and tradition.)

    Sorry for the sideliner, everybody; not trying to hijack the thread - I've been trying like mad to place Cherish since she joined the board!

    She's right - her school is held in very high regard by two well-renowned teaching hospitals. "Diploma" does not mean "copout", folks. I doubt any of the OPs friends will demand a show of credentials when they're hospitalized; all folks want to know is that you know what you're doing. Ultimately they are not going to care where your RN came from.

    I myself looked into Cherish's school - but a BSN fit where I wanted to go. At some point I'd like to give birth, and I want to do primary care, so I needed a quicker track to FNP. But I really would have liked to go to a diploma program; I don't think there are more "technically clean" nurses than a diploma grad. They certainly have placed more Foleys than I! :spin:
    Thats cool! I knew you were from NC. When I first started this board I was actually living in MD, trying to get in to Univ. MD. But then the Army sent me a friendly letter saying " I know we just discharged you a year ago but would you mind dropping your life and going to a fantastic vacation spot where its 120 degrees (Iraq btw)?" So off I went, I've got no kids, not married better me than someone with responsibilities. Now I'm in the triangle, before it was bragg.

    Yup, I REALLY didn't know about any nursing program here in NC, I applied my last month in the army just to the diploma program (was honestly going to do a bachelors in Clininical Laboratory Science). But in the back of my head wanted to know if nursing was still there for me. Plus some people I heard talked about it, did research on the school and decided I wanted to be apart of it.

    So what school are you going to UNC or Duke?
    Last edit by Cherish on Apr 30, '07
  3. 0
    Quote from carolinapooh
    It MIGHT. In fact - and someone correct me if I'm wrong - there are BSN programs that do not recognize diploma nurses. That may be a consideration when trying to decide what program you'd like to enter. Call up your chosen/potential BSN programs and ask them directly.
    UNC-Chapel Hill, and UNC-Greensboro accepts diploma RN's for RN-BSN. I've already talked to them and have all pre-req's except for 4 done that they require. I'm doing the 4 pre-req's in the summer times because the program is off on summers, which I'm hearing is rare for NS schools.
  4. 0
    Quote from Cherish
    UNC-Chapel Hill, and UNC-Greensboro accepts diploma RN's for RN-BSN. I've already talked to them and have all pre-req's except for 4 done that they require. I'm doing the 4 pre-req's in the summer times because the program is off on summers, which I'm hearing is rare for NS schools.
    True for around here, yes, (btw, Duke has an online RN-BSN option and will accept diploma grads as long as all prereq requirements are met) but I don't think it's true everywhere. Twisted, yes.
  5. 0
    Quote from Cherish
    Thats cool! I knew you were from NC. When I first started this board I was actually living in MD, trying to get in to Univ. MD. But then the Army sent me a friendly letter saying " I know we just discharged you a year ago but would you mind dropping your life and going to a fantastic vacation spot where its 120 degrees (Iraq btw)?" So off I went, I've got no kids, not married better me than someone with responsibilities. Now I'm in the triangle, before it was bragg.

    Yup, I REALLY didn't know about any nursing program here in NC, I applied my last month in the army just to the diploma program (was honestly going to do a bachelors in Clininical Laboratory Science). But in the back of my head wanted to know if nursing was still there for me. Plus some people I heard talked about it, did research on the school and decided I wanted to be apart of it.

    So what school are you going to UNC or Duke?
    Duke. The first nursing class graduated from Duke in 1931 in a 3 year hospital program. Nurses could earn a BS from Duke with two additional years at the university. UNC's School of Nursing wasn't founded - believe it or not - until 1950, but it was the first baccalaureate nursing degree program in the state. Duke's BSN program began in 1953.
  6. 0
    Quote from NorfolkRN
    I graduated from a diploma program in 2001 and have never gotten anything but respect from my coworkers regardless of their own educational levels. When i started in the ICU along with several other new grads some who had diplomas and others who had BSNs, it was quite obvious who had better clinical skills. I had spent twice as much time in the hospital setting compared to my bachelors prepared colleagues. However if you ever want to move away from the bedside and work in management or administration you must have at least a BSN so that is something to think about.
    When it all comes down to it though, nursing is not something that is learned in the classroom. You can know everything in the world about A&P and nursing theory and still be a terrible nurse.
    AMEN!! and a big DITTO!
    I am an ancient diploma nurse and the school that I went to still has the highest NCLEX passing rate of any school in the state (this includes the universities). I think the extra time we spent in the hospital and doing those god-awful careplans etc helped me in learning to prioritize, organize and to holistically look at the patient. Even though some rotations at school were hellacious it helped me to to grow and develop into the nurse I am today. Do what feels best for you. I am currently in school now for a BSN-MSN and wish I would have completed it when I was younger and absorbed information better!!!! Good luck and God bless!
  7. 0
    Quote from blueheaven
    AMEN!! and a big DITTO!
    I am an ancient diploma nurse and the school that I went to still has the highest NCLEX passing rate of any school in the state (this includes the universities). I think the extra time we spent in the hospital and doing those god-awful careplans etc helped me in learning to prioritize, organize and to holistically look at the patient. Even though some rotations at school were hellacious it helped me to to grow and develop into the nurse I am today. Do what feels best for you. I am currently in school now for a BSN-MSN and wish I would have completed it when I was younger and absorbed information better!!!! Good luck and God bless!

    And I will DITTO you as well. A proud diploma grad.


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