Average Salary for ADN vs BSN

  1. 0
    Hello,

    I know this will vary greatly by region, but what is the average pay for an entry-level nurse (right out of school) with an Associates in Nursing versus a Bachelors in Nursing? Has anyone found that it has been difficult to find a job if you have an ADN? I'm trying to figure out the best educational path, while juggling a full-time job and small child.

    Thanks!
  2. 97 Comments so far...

  3. 2
    No difference in pay at my hospital. I could've taken any path, but because I learn best in hands-on situations, I went to a diploma school attached to the hospital where I planned on working (the school was famous for tons of quality clinicals), plus I worked there as an aide while going to school. However I never planned to be anything but a bedside nurse, which I love. You might want a BSN if you plan on getting a mgmt job or going on to get a MSN. ADN takes about 3 years around here, diploma school including prereqs, 3.5, BSN 4, so really there's no significant time difference.
    RNKel and Southern_87 like this.
  4. 0
    Depends on the place. My hospital doesn't differentiate as far as I know. However, one of the girls I went to school with who was going to St. Louis, MO said they tack an extra dollar or two onto the base pay for BSN.

    ADN vs. BSN? Pain in the butt either way with a full time job (a pain without a full time job). ADN might be easier if you have night classes.
  5. 1
    In this area, it's a one dollar per hour difference. My ADN class is just graduating now. Some of my classmates have been told by managers that the managers are only hiring BSNs or ADNs who are enrolled in an RN-BSN program. Some other managers are hiring ADNs. At this point about 1/3 of my class has found jobs. Most of those who have job offers either worked as a tech during school or are already in an RN-BSN program.

    If they economy doesn't pick up, a BSN will give you an edge over the ADNs. If the economy does pick up, it may not matter at all.
    TattooedMama likes this.
  6. 5
    The hospital I'm starting at in August pays everyone, regardless of educational background, $44.85/hour for their first six months as an entry-level new grad.

    After that six months, ADNs earn $47.12/hour and BSNs or MSNs get $48.32/hour. On a 36-hour a week schedule it's about a $2,200 dollar difference in gross annual income. My understanding though is that most hospitals in the area don't offer pay incentives for BSNs, and it's only a feather in your cap during the hiring process.
    melby87, CaliJessXoxo, TattooedMama, and 2 others like this.
  7. 2
    Quote from Mike A. Fungin RN
    The hospital I'm starting at in August pays everyone, regardless of educational background, $44.85/hour for their first six months as an entry-level new grad.

    After that six months, ADNs earn $47.12/hour and BSNs or MSNs get $48.32/hour. On a 36-hour a week schedule it's about a $2,200 dollar difference in gross annual income. My understanding though is that most hospitals in the area don't offer pay incentives for BSNs, and it's only a feather in your cap during the hiring process.




    What city do you work in?
    SoCalCrafter and TattooedMama like this.
  8. 3
    4% more for the BSN entry level new grad nurse, or about 75 to 90 cents an hour more. This small amount of money turns people off. But one has to remember that's entry level...both are RNs passing the same NCLEX, so it's natural that at an entry level the salary should be similar.

    The BSN is an investment in future opportunities down the line when one isn't an entry level nurse anymore and wants to move on.
    kay s, ShannonRN2010, and TattooedMama like this.
  9. 1
    Around here the pay is the same for ADN or BSN. The BSN programs are dieing out now that there are ADN-MSN bridge programs. ADN is more focused on nursing and the BSN adds in a bunch of management courses to bring the credit hrs up to 128. If I was advising new students I would discourage them from spending the extra 2 years in a BSN program.
    TattooedMama likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from WULTKMS23
    What city do you work in?
    he/she must work in New York City.. The only city I know that pays around that range lol
  11. 2
    Quote from missie925RN
    he/she must work in New York City.. The only city I know that pays around that range lol
    I don't know about NYC, but San Francisco pays that well . . . the power of the union!!

    Oh, the original question: no difference in pay for ADN vs BSN. To advance to higher RN classifications, you need BSN or more.


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