ADN vs. BSN for Entry Level Nursing - page 3

by pattycakebaby

55,436 Views | 102 Comments

The new push is for all nurses to be baccalaureate prepared, eliminating the 2 year associate degree program. Given the current and future nursing shortage, what is your opinion?... Read More


  1. 0
    I think that most RNs would say that having a BSN is more beneficial to the RNs in terms of being consider a "Profession". In every avenues, we looked at professionals with degrees such MD, Pharmacist, Accountant, Analysts...etc. Associate degree is a degree but often looked at as a short-easy way of earning some form of degree. It is like a certificate type program. When people look at professionals, they look at those who pursue 4 or more full-time years of college education. On the other hand, ADN is really not a simple two year program... it is almost a 4year program just like the baccalaureate program sometimes longer. I have difficulty understanding why people would pursue the ADN route (except for cost), while time spent to complete the program is about the same. Perhaps, a two tier salary should be available to ADN vs BSN/MSN RNs then maybe will see a rise in BSN driven RNs. Eventually, we will perhaps get the respect we all been aspiring to achieve as a "professional worker".
  2. 0
    Not all diploma programs "get more clinical hours". Maybe in some places but certainly not all. If I were hiring i'd be interested in the all around best canidate. I know several individuals who could have all the clinical hours in the world and still end up not being proficient. The real question is: after nursing students make the transition into the workforce, and after a year or so, what is the advantage of one degree over another?
  3. 0
    [QUOTE=zenman]
    If one wants to debate the issue, you must leave out the commonly debated distractions:

    "We all take the same exam."
    "We all take the NCLEX."
    Anything to do with the amount of clinical time.
    Anything to do with pay.

    QUOTE]

    I totally agree with number 3.
  4. 0
    what a hot topic! for nursing students i believe we just need the advice of experienced nurses - no matter what degree they have. i just need to now what the oppurtunities of advancement are if you have your assoicates vs. bsn. i believe both are worthy, but when you are an older student knowledge is power for making this type of decision. if a person wanted to get into teaching what would be the better degree to have?
    i live in ohio, so does anyone know what the nursing direction is going toward? what do most hospitals really look at? i do not believe the pay in any different here. what would be a good community college to go to for the assoicates, and a good university for the bsn?
    when training a new nurse which do you feel is better adaptable, the assoicates vs. bsn?
    these are things no college will tell you, and i have heard the personnel department just does not know because they do not work on the floors. the experience nurses are the one's to talk to!
    please remember, for nursing students we don't care if you have your assoicates vs. bsn, we just need your experienced advice.
  5. 1
    Quote from ilidan01
    what a hot topic! for nursing students i believe we just need the advice of experienced nurses - no matter what degree they have. i just need to now what the oppurtunities of advancement are if you have your assoicates vs. bsn. i believe both are worthy, but when you are an older student knowledge is power for making this type of decision. if a person wanted to get into teaching what would be the better degree to have?
    i live in ohio, so does anyone know what the nursing direction is going toward? what do most hospitals really look at? i do not believe the pay in any different here. what would be a good community college to go to for the assoicates, and a good university for the bsn?
    when training a new nurse which do you feel is better adaptable, the assoicates vs. bsn?
    these are things no college will tell you, and i have heard the personnel department just does not know because they do not work on the floors. the experience nurses are the one's to talk to!
    please remember, for nursing students we don't care if you have your assoicates vs. bsn, we just need your experienced advice.
    some of your questions can be answered in the ohio nurses forum.

    both the bsn and the adn nurse start out as new grad rns, pretty much on equal footing, making the same amount of money.

    there are "bsn preferred" positions in education, management, research, community health, drug companies, and insurance companies where with experience the bsn nurse has the edge. also many people with a bsn use this to go on to become nurse practioners and other master's level positions.

    hospital employers looking for entry level nurses, usually consider adn and bsn nurses equally, without much favoritism. sometimes the individual manager/recruiter has their own preferences. i heard a recruiter, i forget where she was, who preferred the adn students in her area because their clinical experience was better. other recruiters may be more slanted to the bsn. but the most part, entry level bedside nurse positions both degrees are fairly well received. (and no, i can't tell the difference between an adn grad and a bsn grad, they both are greeen "deer in the headlights" kind of nurses, focused on mastering the tasks of nursing.)

    i am currently bridging from adn to bsn because i want more opportunities away from the bedside as i age. i'm leading towards education, but want to have options available to me. i can't see me med-surg bedside nursing until i'm 70 and can retire.

    i recommend if you have the time and money, to get the bsn now, get it out of the way as you may want it later. don't believe those who say "bsn is a waste of time". (you said that in your other post that the moderators locked.) it might be their choice and for them, but that kind of blanket statement doesn't apply to us all.
    Last edit by Tweety on May 26, '06
    Tragically Hip likes this.
  6. 0
    thank you tweety for your advice! i will take it all into consideration! it was a great help.
  7. 0
    Quote from ilidan01
    thank you tweety for your advice! i will take it all into consideration! it was a great help.

    you are more than welcome. good luck to you.
  8. 2
    For those of you who consider this topic a 'dead horse', please remember that to those of us just coming into the career, it is a live and kicking little stallion! I am a new nurse, just graduated from an ADN program, and with a 100% pass rate on the NCLEX for our class, (and the previous semester also), I am proud of my program, and of my education. I feel prepared and ready for my new career, (also scared to death, hence the deer in the headlights look). I will be going for my BSN, but for me, the quickest route to a new career, and making money, was the ADN program. It did take me 3 and 1/2 years, but the cost of the BSN programs in my area was so much more (my education cost approx. 8 thousand, the bsn program was 70 thousand!!!!!)there was no way for me to do that. The bottom line is, I am a nurse, I am proud to be one, and no one will make me feel less educated or prepared because of my ADN status. I will go on with my education, because the management opportunities are definately more available to the BSN graduates, and I believe that as nurses, we learn on a daily basis. So, because of my economic status, I had to make a choice. My program was brutal, I busted my heiny to complete it, I graduated with honors and am very proud of myself. It is too bad that it seems that some people seem to think that ADN nurses are somehow less able or prepared due to their education. (at least the tone of some of the posts seem that way) I believe that it also depends on each individual person. I have seen BSN graduates working as CNA's, going for their 4th try at the NCLEX, and seen ADN's going into management. So....... this is kind of like the chicken and the egg question. I don't think there is a right answer, there are just so many factors to consider. As far as requiring a BSN to become a nurse? I am thankful that I could get my ADN before they made that decision, because I probably would not have been able to afford to become a nurse. Will we lose more people who can go on to become excellent caregivers if they change the entry standards? Hmmmm. I think that nursing is a unique profession, and that we should stand by each other, not try to rank each other. Whatever my 'rank', I am darn proud to be able to say I am a nurse.
    futurernjap and hijadecalifas like this.
  9. 0
    We know deep down a BSN doesn't mean that the person is smarter than an ADN, but simply they devoted the time to learn or tackle the "liberal arts side of it". Im in the BSN because I took the pre reqs and felt it wouldn't be useful for me to put it on the back burner. Take charge and go for it; if you don't you will eventually after ADN. I know some BSN students who degrade ADN students; but I know life is hard and some hurdles are higher for some than others (example a 20 yr old with no kids living on campus) as oppossed to a 22 YO with a 4 YO daughter, driving 120 miles... of course it's easier for the 20 YO. Do what you can handle without going off the deep end...
  10. 0
    I strongly dought that any of the ADN programs are in danger of not being around any more, if anything there are more cropping up everywhere.


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