ADN is fine?

  1. 0
    Hello,

    I'm a student at UNH in Durham, NH. I am currently on a pre-nursing track to get a BSN. This is going to take me five years, as I had some trouble finding what I truly wanted to do.

    Through my work on my local ambulance as an EMT, I have decided that I want to work somewhere in the medical field (Most likely flight Nurse or Paramedic). I was wondering if getting a BSN is totally worth it. I realize that I have the option to get it later, which I would plan to do anyways. What is your opinion on this topic. What should I do? 5 years and get BSN, or 2 and get ADN? Also, how are those online RN-BSN programs, and are they worth it???

    I know for a fact that I will get paramedic at some point, as I can challenge the paramedic test with an RN degree. This is just going to be a hobby though as a volunteer.

    Thanks - MTruland
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  4. 0
    I went the ADN route and have never regretted it. After a two year break from school, I went back and completed my BSN totally online. My employer also paid for my BSN, so it was a win-win situation for me. I worked full-time (and had a newborn and toddler) while completing the program and never really had much problem. Luckily, I also have a fabulous husband who supported me every step of the way.
    Good luck with whatever you decide on.
  5. 0
    Thanks for the reply. I really am up in arms about this whole situation. I really don't want to spend another 80,000 if it really isn't going to help me out that much...

    Thanks,
    Matt
  6. 0
    Whether it's worth it depends on your goals. But it's a good investment in your future. Some ADNs have pre-reqs and waiting lists that wind up taking four years. But if you can truly become an RN 2 years from now, it's probably better to do that. Otherwise if it's more than two years, stick with the BSN if you can get it and get it out of the way.

    I'm in an RN to BSN program and can do it while working full time. I'm relative sure it's going to be my ticket away from floor nursing when the stress and physical nature of the job gets to me as I age. Many say "I have not desire to get away from patients" and that's fine, but some of us are looking at having to work until age 65 and beyond and who is to say what I'm going to feel like 20 years from now after I've been a floor nurse for 40 years. I don't want to go into management for sure.
  7. 0
    Go for the ADN and get your employer to pay for your BSN. You can be getting experience and income while you complete your RN-BSN. There are a lot of quality online programs these days.

    Good luck!
  8. 0
    I would apply to both (assuming you haven't already applied to UNH's program). If you check out the NH forum you'll see that there's lots of competition for the local ADN programs and lots of qualified people get rejected or waitlisted. So I would keep all your options open.
  9. 0
    At the risk of upsetting a bunch of people I can only think of 4 reasons a person should get a BSN as their qualifying degree.
    1. They are a new high school grad and need the college experience.
    2. You get a free ride scholarship.
    3. The waiting list to a CC is longer than 1 year.
    4. You already have a BS in another field and go the accelerated BSN rout.

    Except for those reasons I think it's better to get an ADN. They are cheaper and if you can get one in 2 year as we can here in Wisconsin you could spend the next two years getting an online BSN with your hospital paying for it while making $50,000/year.
    By going the ADN rout in four years you could have a free BSN, two years experience as an RN and would have made around $100K in those two years. By going traditional BSN rout in four years you will graduate as a new grad with student loans and won't have made any money and won't have any experience.
  10. 0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    At the risk of upsetting a bunch of people I can only think of 4 reasons a person should get a BSN as their qualifying degree.
    1. They are a new high school grad and need the college experience.
    2. You get a free ride scholarship.
    3. The waiting list to a CC is longer than 1 year.
    4. You already have a BS in another field and go the accelerated BSN rout.

    Except for those reasons I think it's better to get an ADN. They are cheaper and if you can get one in 2 year as we can here in Wisconsin you could spend the next two years getting an online BSN with your hospital paying for it while making $50,000/year.
    By going the ADN rout in four years you could have a free BSN, two years experience as an RN and would have made around $100K in those two years. By going traditional BSN rout in four years you will graduate as a new grad with student loans and won't have made any money and won't have any experience.

    Good reasons all.

    But just to clarify that in a lot of parts of the country it's not a "free BSN". Employers usually have a cap on what they pay. My employer pays $2300/year tuition reimbursement. Most other folks in my class have a similar cap. Depending on the school it may indeed be "free" but usually there's some out of pocket expenses, especially if you go the online route.
  11. 0
    This info is really helpful. I'm working on a resolution to my problem with some help with a local guidance counselor. Thanks guys! I think I'll go for the ADN, and then get a BSN later.
  12. 0
    Quote from momof2RN
    I went the ADN route and have never regretted it. After a two year break from school, I went back and completed my BSN totally online. My employer also paid for my BSN, so it was a win-win situation for me. I worked full-time (and had a newborn and toddler) while completing the program and never really had much problem. Luckily, I also have a fabulous husband who supported me every step of the way.
    Good luck with whatever you decide on.
    I am planning to go this route as well...my ADN will cost me about $5,000 total, and to get a BSN for free? You can't beat it!


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