You're going to Community College? - page 6

Ok, I'm sure this isn't a new topic. I am just quite frankly surprised at a few reactions I've received. Everyone I've told, that I'm going back to school, is overwhelmingly happy that I'm doing... Read More

  1. by   supermo
    It is a shame that people with bipolar are afraid for anyone to find out. If they do, we are labelled as nutcases because that's how you always see it on TV.

    I know it's fftopic: BUT--- it just makes me sad. Because of a lack of education/information, I am afraid that I will be discriminated against (in this field). If anyone found out that I am bipolar, I'm sure that it wouldn't go well. It doesn't matter that I have dealt with it for 18 years with no one the wiser. And the first 16 years I dealt with it without medication! :uhoh21: I wish people understood the disorder better. If anyone wants to learn more about it let me know.

    Back on topic-- I am proud to go to my local community college where our motto is--

    CPCC- Central Piedmont Coo-coo College. Home of the nutcases.


    mo bello

    :roll today
    tomorrow
    :lol_hitti next week

    Just kidding!!!!
    I just realized.... A&P II starts in 1 day :smackingf
  2. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    It is a shame that people with bipolar are afraid for anyone to find out. If they do, we are labelled as nutcases because that's how you always see it on TV.
    I agree.
  3. by   holisticallyminded
    Let's be honest here: where you went to school really doesn't matter when the paycheck comes in. I did my BS in nutrition at a Cal State school, and though my current field is a little bit different in terms of needing a 4 year degree (there aren't 2-yr degrees in dietetics), I'm not paid any more or less because I chose not to go to a UC or some ultra-reputable school. (I decided not to because it cost significantly more than my State U, and I didn't have anyone to help me out with funding). It just doesn't matter. I recognize that there are those who prefer to hire based on the fact that an employee also attended their alma mater, but typically once you leave the state you went to school in, there is less chance of this. Besides, you said you were planning on getting your BSN in the future, so it isn't as though you'd be left out of possible positions which require this degree. It is my understanding that entry-level nurses will obtain employment whether they have the BSN or the ADN. Who cares? This kind of pretention and preoccupation will only get you so far with your patients.
    I say you always choose the least expensive option anyway. This certainly won't be the last time you shell out money for education/job training. Hell, I'm having my employer pay for my ADN. Less $$ that I will have to work off for them in the long-run.
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    (It does matter, however, that your school is accredited)
  5. by   jilliebean
    I got my degree at state university, most of my peers went to cc, a few went to hosp school of nursing.
    We all make the same amt of money, in fact, most hosp in my area give a bsn $100 more PER YEAR, hardly a wise investment of thousands of dollars and 2 extra years of college.
  6. by   piscesgirl
    I go to a community college and am darn proud of it. I would much rather pay $78 a credit hour instead of $1200+ at the other colleges around here. It's all the same education in my opinion. And the CC is much closer to home. I will however have to go to one of the rather expensive schools for my BSN but I'll worry about that when the time comes. And yes the waiting list at the CC is longer but atleast I'll have my noncore classes out of the way when clinicals come instead of having to worry about them all at once. I kind of like the idea of taking A&P in its own semester!
  7. by   stpauligirl
    Quote from piscesgirl
    I go to a community college and am darn proud of it. I would much rather pay $78 a credit hour instead of $1200+ at the other colleges around here. It's all the same education in my opinion. And the CC is much closer to home. I will however have to go to one of the rather expensive schools for my BSN but I'll worry about that when the time comes. And yes the waiting list at the CC is longer but atleast I'll have my noncore classes out of the way when clinicals come instead of having to worry about them all at once. I kind of like the idea of taking A&P in its own semester!
    I took A&P on its own and I am glad that I did. The class was alot of work. I am also at a CC knocking out all prerequs first so that I only have the nursing classes to worry about when the time comes.
    You are smart!
  8. by   vega
    Quote from multicollinarity
    Enough. How do you deal with this?
    You ignore it as best you can, knowing that you've made the right decision for yourself. If that fails, have a collection of snarky comebacks in your repertoire.

    I'm 38 years old and I have been a stay home mom for the last 10 years, thus making my previous job experience obsolete. Sure, I could reclimb the ladder, but my former career isn't really well-suited for family life anyway. Community college makes perfect sense to me, although like you, I've encountered friends and family that react negatively to my choice of college. For that matter, no one seems overly supportive of my decision to start a second career in nursing.

    My husband and I will have four children to help through college, so taking on a huge student loan to make a career change at my age just doesn't make sense. $80 per credit hour versus $500 - 1500 per credit hour is a no-brainer in my book! After all, as new grads, we'll all be wearing the same initials on our name badges. Sure, there are more opportunities available for nurses with advanced degrees, and I would like to pursue furthering my education once I'm employed; working as a RN will make these options more feasible from a financial perspective, especially with some of the tuition assistance benefits offered by local hospitals.

    A new career for $6000 and a two-year committment? That's a smart decision (if I do say so myself) and a great return on a small investment. That's how I respond to the naysayers in my midst.
    Last edit by vega on Jan 8, '06
  9. by   stpauligirl
    Quote from vega
    You ignore it as best you can, knowing that you've made the right decision for yourself. If that fails, have a collection of snarky comebacks in your repertoire.

    I'm 38 years old and I have been a stay home mom for the last 10 years, thus making my previous job experience obsolete. Sure, I could reclimb the ladder, but my former career isn't really well-suited for family life anyway. Community college makes perfect sense to me, although like you, I've encountered friends and family that react negatively to my choice of college. For that matter, no one seems overly supportive of my decision to start a second career in nursing.

    My husband and I will have four children to help through college, so taking on a huge student loan to make a career change at my age just doesn't make sense. $80 per credit hour versus $500 - 1500 per credit hour is a no-brainer in my book! After all, as new grads, we'll all be wearing the same initials on our name badges. Sure, there are more opportunities available for nurses with advanced degrees, and I would like to pursue furthering my education once I'm employed; working as a RN will make these options more feasible from a financial perspective, especially with some of the tuition assistance benefits offered by local hospitals.

    A new career for $6000 and a two-year committment? That's a smart decision (if I do say so myself) and a great return on a small investment. That's how I respond to the naysayers in my midst.
    As long as you have your husband's support who cares what others say. You go girl, become a nurse!!!!!!!
  10. by   rafael80
    i am very proud to attend a community college. im gonna be a registered nurse and experience will make me a good nurse , not what school i went to. there are great techers here at vvc.
  11. by   stpauligirl
    Quote from rafael80
    i am very proud to attend a community college. im gonna be a registered nurse and experience will make me a good nurse , not what school i went to. there are great techers here at vvc.
    Great teachers are half the battle
  12. by   NaomieRN
    I am also going to a private school, I did not want to wait for 3 years to get accepted to a community college. The first time I told my friends, some were trying to discourage me. I told them, if you can take a loan for a car, I dont see why I cannot take a loan for my education. I also told them, you get a better return in education than taking out a loan to buy a new car. The minute you leave the dealerhip, the car depreciates. So, education gives a better investment. Good luck to you all
  13. by   stpauligirl
    Quote from FutureNurse35
    I am also going to a private school, I did not want to wait for 3 years to get accepted to a community college. The first time I told my friends, some were trying to discourage me. I told them, if you can take a loan for a car, I dont see why I cannot take a loan for my education. I also told them, you get a better return in education than taking out a loan to buy a new car. The minute you leave the dealerhip, the car depreciates. So, education gives a better investment. Good luck to you all
    You are so right, a student loan is such a better investment than any other loan.....I will have to go the student loan route eventually. Right now pay out of my own pocket. I am at CC and there is no waiting list to get into nursing program but plenty of competition :uhoh21:

close