Why do some choose to pursue BSN over ASN first?

  1. 0 In my own mind, I cannot rationalize it. The ASN program is 18 months. Once you graduate and pass boards, you can nurse. At that point you can immediately begin taking the classes needed for BSN. But from what I understand, if you are enrolled in the BSN program from the start, you cannot nurse until you've graduated the program.

    Other than not wanting to take classes while working, I can't see why anyone would choose to take the long route. I'm sure some have their reasons, though, which is why I'm inquiring.
  2. Visit  MedicalPartisan profile page

    About MedicalPartisan

    From 'Beach'; 25 Years Old; Joined May '13; Posts: 180; Likes: 143.

    54 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  sj20fame profile page
    3
    18 months is awesome! Here in Illinois, the NURSING ADN program is two years with about a year of prereqs prior to trying to get in. When you finish your pre-reqs the counselor suggest taking another year of extra classes & getting your associates in science & transferring to do an additional 2 years & graduating with your BSN .....in Illinois many hospital s require BSN when they hire that's why many choose BSN route.... Other people are okay with working at clinics with their Rn associates... Guess it just depends what type of job & where an individual would like ..?
    antania31, ianguitarist, and hope3456 like this.
  4. Visit  sj20fame profile page
    0
    Totally get your point though! I'm applying to both programs the BSN & RN(ADN) program ...whichever accept s me first I'm going!=]
  5. Visit  sj20fame profile page
    1
    ADN is the associate Degree in Nursing ...FYI.
    Success4all likes this.
  6. Visit  douxmusique profile page
    3
    They might be out there but I havent heard of any asn programs being 18 months prereqs to finishm like a pp mentioned many/most have at least a year of prereqs, sometimes three semesters, then an additional four semesterd of nursing core. In many BSN programs the progression is almost the same with a few extra classes and you can still finish in three years if you take your prereqs stacked and through summer.

    I guess it comes down tothe necessity of working or not. If someone doesnt need to work asap then why not just get into a bsn program and go that route?

    Personally I had so many additional classes that bsn degrees require it would have been a waste of my previous time and money spent on education to go with an asn which was my original plan way back when.

    So there are a lot of personal circumstances out there and different program options to fit everyones personal styles. Its not always a matter of working asap or getting done fastest.
    antania31, Success4all, and ira89 like this.
  7. Visit  ShelbyaStar profile page
    0
    I don't understand it either for most cases. It certainly is the most cost effective option and I would do the same if I were starting from scratch- if nothing else one can work part time as an LPN or RN while going to school part time to finish a BSN.

    However, I have a previous BS so it's a bit silly to go back for an ASN, especially since some of my transfer credits would expire by the time I was done with that and wanted to transfer them into a bridge program. I don't want to totally waste my first degree and not have chem, writing, etc not count. So that's why I'm going straight to a BSN. I am hoping to transfer to an area where I can do an accelerated program at least but for now I'm just cranking out a variety of prereqs so that I can transfer anywhere.
  8. Visit  nekozuki profile page
    4
    BSN is rapidly becoming the entry-level requirement for new grad nurses in many areas (primarily hospitals). As nursing becomes more competitive, the minimum standards rise. Between the influx of new grad nurses and hospital after hospital wanting to boast "magnet status," many are hedging their bets and electing to earn the BSN before venturing out into the job market.

    **Just wanted to add that it doesn't really save you any extra time! Once your pre-reqs are done, you complete an ASN program, then follow along a bridge path for an additional year. It actually takes longer in many cases, if not the same amount of time!

    BSN program at the large university near me: 5 semesters once pre-reqs are finished
    ADN program at my local CC: 6 semsters once pre-reqs are done, however, there is a 1-2 year waiting list to get in. Afterward, the ADN to BSN bridge program is 3-4 semesters, depending on the pace you want.
    Last edit by nekozuki on Jan 26, '14 : Reason: Adding about length of time
    ira89, SoldierNurse22, LadyFree28, and 1 other like this.
  9. Visit  MedicalPartisan profile page
    1
    Quote from nekozuki
    **Just wanted to add that it doesn't really save you any extra time! Once your pre-reqs are done, you complete an ASN program, then follow along a bridge path for an additional year. It actually takes longer in many cases, if not the same amount of time!
    I guess it just depends on personal goals. I understand that it saves no time, but it allows you to start nursing and make money much sooner. If I chose to pursue the ASN program, I can graduate in ~2 years and begin my career as a nurse. As you nurse, you can immediately start taking BSN classes.

    Now, if you go the BSN route first, I will have been nursing for two years already and making money, saving toward retirement, and gaining experience before you are graduated. And we will both have our BSN at about the same time.
    PaulaSullivan likes this.
  10. Visit  Rose_Queen profile page
    5
    Quote from MedicalPartisan
    I guess it just depends on personal goals. I understand that it saves no time, but it allows you to start nursing and make money much sooner. If I chose to pursue the ASN program, I can graduate in ~2 years and begin my career as a nurse. As you nurse, you can immediately start taking BSN classes.

    Now, if you go the BSN route first, I will have been nursing for two years already and making money, saving toward retirement, and gaining experience before you are graduated. And we will both have our BSN at about the same time.
    Provided that without a BSN you can find employment. Many hospitals are requiring a BSN to apply for positions. No BSN? You get kicked out of the online application as soon as you click no. Keep in mind as well that many areas are seeing an oversaturation of nurses. Long gone are the days of the "nursing shortage" that now only exists in a few areas where no one wants to live/work. With the number of applicants for each open position, hospitals have to cull the numbers somehow- for many, that means applications from ADNs get sent to the round file and only those from BSNs get passed on.

    However, it appears you have already made your decision and have no intent to consider the advice of those of us already in the workforce or searching for jobs. Good luck in your first job search.
    llg, elkpark, HouTx, and 2 others like this.
  11. Visit  RInursingstudent profile page
    1
    Quote from douxmusique
    They might be out there but I havent heard of any asn programs being 18 months prereqs to finishm like a pp mentioned many/most have at least a year of prereqs, sometimes three semesters, then an additional four semesterd of nursing core. In many BSN programs the progression is almost the same with a few extra classes and you can still finish in three years if you take your prereqs stacked and through summer.

    I guess it comes down tothe necessity of working or not. If someone doesnt need to work asap then why not just get into a bsn program and go that route?

    Personally I had so many additional classes that bsn degrees require it would have been a waste of my previous time and money spent on education to go with an asn which was my original plan way back when.

    So there are a lot of personal circumstances out there and different program options to fit everyones personal styles. Its not always a matter of working asap or getting done fastest.
    I think the OP means that the actual program itself is 18 months once you are accepted; not including the pre- reqs beforehand.
    antania31 likes this.
  12. Visit  MedicalPartisan profile page
    0
    Quote from Sweet_Wild_Rose
    However, it appears you have already made your decision and have no intent to consider the advice of those of us already in the workforce or searching for jobs. Good luck in your first job search.
    No need to take offense, I was just putting my personal experience/plan on the table. I have already been promised a job by the clinical manager in the ED in which I work (don't start the program until May) and I have a BAS already so I will have no issue. I understand, however, that not everyone is in this situation.
  13. Visit  nekozuki profile page
    7
    Quote from MedicalPartisan

    Now, if you go the BSN route first, I will have been nursing for two years already and making money, saving toward retirement, and gaining experience before you are graduated. And we will both have our BSN at about the same time.
    Alright, so you graduate with your ADN and you're ready to go out into the world and get a leg up on all these idealistic, impractical BSN students, right? Sweet! Here we go!

    Hm, strange, seems that hospitals and acute care facilities won't accept ADN grads without prior experience.

    Four months later, no luck landing a hospital position.

    Settle into office work, in which your clinical skills atrophy, or settle into LTC, in which your clinical skills atrophy. But what you lose in clinical skills, you make up for with medpass, right?

    Alright, BSN earned!

    Wait, you mean none of my job experience matters when I apply for a hospital position? The fresh BSN student is now more qualified than an ADN with two years of non-hospital experience?

    This is sometimes (though not always) the reality of the world we live in. During clinicals, I had a hospital hiring manager specifically tell me to be careful in working between my ADN and BSN, because they preferred a clean slate versus someone who spent a few fears in LTC.

    In my opinion, many pre-nursing students on this site would benefit from SLOWING DOWN and thinking long-term about what they want ten, twenty, thirty years from now rather than indulge in the instant gratification of NOW NOW NOW. It is how people dig themselves into professional holes, are preyed upon for shady for-profit schools and screw themselves out of their dreams.

    ***OP: You stated that you had a job waiting for you in ER already. Overwhelmingly, students do not have this luxury, and therefore make choices that will benefit them the most in this competitive world.
    TraumaSurfer, llg, elkpark, and 4 others like this.
  14. Visit  MedicalPartisan profile page
    0
    Quote from nekozuki
    In my opinion, many pre-nursing students on this site would benefit from SLOWING DOWN and thinking long-term about what they want ten, twenty, thirty years from now rather than indulge in the instant gratification of NOW NOW NOW. It is how people dig themselves into professional holes, are preyed upon for shady for-profit schools and screw themselves out of their dreams.
    Which is why I first complete my BAS in healthcare management. I figured that in twenty or so years I might not want to do direct patient care and can then pursue a job in clinical management. I am definitely a planner. I am 23 now and ready to start my life; I don't want to wait any longer so I chose the associate's program first but will absolutely enter the BSN program.

    And things obviously differ everywhere you go but to everyone saying that a BSN is required, that is not at all the case in Pensacola or the surrounding areas. I have many friends who didn't pursue a bachelor's first and are already nurses and obtained jobs within a month of passing boards. Most don't get right in to the ED, though, without at least six months to a year of experience.

    I know it's different everywhere, but I can only speak for myself and my own personal experience/research.

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