Why do some choose to pursue BSN over ASN first?

  1. 0
    In my own mind, I cannot rationalize it. The ASN program is 18 months. Once you graduate and pass boards, you can nurse. At that point you can immediately begin taking the classes needed for BSN. But from what I understand, if you are enrolled in the BSN program from the start, you cannot nurse until you've graduated the program.

    Other than not wanting to take classes while working, I can't see why anyone would choose to take the long route. I'm sure some have their reasons, though, which is why I'm inquiring.
  2. 54 Comments so far...

  3. 3
    18 months is awesome! Here in Illinois, the NURSING ADN program is two years with about a year of prereqs prior to trying to get in. When you finish your pre-reqs the counselor suggest taking another year of extra classes & getting your associates in science & transferring to do an additional 2 years & graduating with your BSN .....in Illinois many hospital s require BSN when they hire that's why many choose BSN route.... Other people are okay with working at clinics with their Rn associates... Guess it just depends what type of job & where an individual would like ..?
    antania31, ianguitarist, and hope3456 like this.
  4. 0
    Totally get your point though! I'm applying to both programs the BSN & RN(ADN) program ...whichever accept s me first I'm going!=]
  5. 1
    ADN is the associate Degree in Nursing ...FYI.
    Success4all likes this.
  6. 3
    They might be out there but I havent heard of any asn programs being 18 months prereqs to finishm like a pp mentioned many/most have at least a year of prereqs, sometimes three semesters, then an additional four semesterd of nursing core. In many BSN programs the progression is almost the same with a few extra classes and you can still finish in three years if you take your prereqs stacked and through summer.

    I guess it comes down tothe necessity of working or not. If someone doesnt need to work asap then why not just get into a bsn program and go that route?

    Personally I had so many additional classes that bsn degrees require it would have been a waste of my previous time and money spent on education to go with an asn which was my original plan way back when.

    So there are a lot of personal circumstances out there and different program options to fit everyones personal styles. Its not always a matter of working asap or getting done fastest.
    antania31, Success4all, and ira89 like this.
  7. 0
    I don't understand it either for most cases. It certainly is the most cost effective option and I would do the same if I were starting from scratch- if nothing else one can work part time as an LPN or RN while going to school part time to finish a BSN.

    However, I have a previous BS so it's a bit silly to go back for an ASN, especially since some of my transfer credits would expire by the time I was done with that and wanted to transfer them into a bridge program. I don't want to totally waste my first degree and not have chem, writing, etc not count. So that's why I'm going straight to a BSN. I am hoping to transfer to an area where I can do an accelerated program at least but for now I'm just cranking out a variety of prereqs so that I can transfer anywhere.
  8. 4
    BSN is rapidly becoming the entry-level requirement for new grad nurses in many areas (primarily hospitals). As nursing becomes more competitive, the minimum standards rise. Between the influx of new grad nurses and hospital after hospital wanting to boast "magnet status," many are hedging their bets and electing to earn the BSN before venturing out into the job market.

    **Just wanted to add that it doesn't really save you any extra time! Once your pre-reqs are done, you complete an ASN program, then follow along a bridge path for an additional year. It actually takes longer in many cases, if not the same amount of time!

    BSN program at the large university near me: 5 semesters once pre-reqs are finished
    ADN program at my local CC: 6 semsters once pre-reqs are done, however, there is a 1-2 year waiting list to get in. Afterward, the ADN to BSN bridge program is 3-4 semesters, depending on the pace you want.
    Last edit by nekozuki on Jan 26 : Reason: Adding about length of time
    ira89, SoldierNurse22, LadyFree28, and 1 other like this.
  9. 1
    Quote from nekozuki
    **Just wanted to add that it doesn't really save you any extra time! Once your pre-reqs are done, you complete an ASN program, then follow along a bridge path for an additional year. It actually takes longer in many cases, if not the same amount of time!
    I guess it just depends on personal goals. I understand that it saves no time, but it allows you to start nursing and make money much sooner. If I chose to pursue the ASN program, I can graduate in ~2 years and begin my career as a nurse. As you nurse, you can immediately start taking BSN classes.

    Now, if you go the BSN route first, I will have been nursing for two years already and making money, saving toward retirement, and gaining experience before you are graduated. And we will both have our BSN at about the same time.
    PaulaSullivan likes this.
  10. 5
    Quote from MedicalPartisan
    I guess it just depends on personal goals. I understand that it saves no time, but it allows you to start nursing and make money much sooner. If I chose to pursue the ASN program, I can graduate in ~2 years and begin my career as a nurse. As you nurse, you can immediately start taking BSN classes.

    Now, if you go the BSN route first, I will have been nursing for two years already and making money, saving toward retirement, and gaining experience before you are graduated. And we will both have our BSN at about the same time.
    Provided that without a BSN you can find employment. Many hospitals are requiring a BSN to apply for positions. No BSN? You get kicked out of the online application as soon as you click no. Keep in mind as well that many areas are seeing an oversaturation of nurses. Long gone are the days of the "nursing shortage" that now only exists in a few areas where no one wants to live/work. With the number of applicants for each open position, hospitals have to cull the numbers somehow- for many, that means applications from ADNs get sent to the round file and only those from BSNs get passed on.

    However, it appears you have already made your decision and have no intent to consider the advice of those of us already in the workforce or searching for jobs. Good luck in your first job search.
    llg, elkpark, HouTx, and 2 others like this.
  11. 1
    Quote from douxmusique
    They might be out there but I havent heard of any asn programs being 18 months prereqs to finishm like a pp mentioned many/most have at least a year of prereqs, sometimes three semesters, then an additional four semesterd of nursing core. In many BSN programs the progression is almost the same with a few extra classes and you can still finish in three years if you take your prereqs stacked and through summer.

    I guess it comes down tothe necessity of working or not. If someone doesnt need to work asap then why not just get into a bsn program and go that route?

    Personally I had so many additional classes that bsn degrees require it would have been a waste of my previous time and money spent on education to go with an asn which was my original plan way back when.

    So there are a lot of personal circumstances out there and different program options to fit everyones personal styles. Its not always a matter of working asap or getting done fastest.
    I think the OP means that the actual program itself is 18 months once you are accepted; not including the pre- reqs beforehand.
    antania31 likes this.


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