Want to go into nursing, but seriously off track, help?

  1. 0 So here's the deal, I originally wanted to get into law school, but after heavily weighing on my decision, I eventually wanted to get into nursing. However, the truth is, I originally applied to be a pre-nursing major, but because of my school's stringent requirements, I missed my opportunity because I couldn't get into 2-3 classes that are essential for the degree, leaving me the option to continue my major in history. Of course, now I am only left with the option of going to nursing through grad-school, but unfortunately, the other problem is that I'm going to graduate very soon (in the next 2 semesters or so) and the only nursing pre-req class I managed to take was human anatomy, psychology of adults (or developmental psychology) and (in most schools) anthropology. So in a nutshell, I can't take any nursing pre-reqs (but I could be very wrong) but I'm still hoping to get into nursing, if at all possible.

    A friend of mine suggested that at the worst case, I'll have to attend a JC to become a RN (that's how she did it), but can anyone suggest any ideas on what to do? I am aware that nursing schools (all of them) require a plethora of classes to even apply, but it would appear I'm in some trouble there. So does anyone have any suggestions?

    So here's the short list; My situation is:
    1. Want to go into nursing, but got interested WAY too late
    2. Only managed to take 3 (or more, depending on some schools) pre-reqs for nursing school after undergrad
    3. Graduating in 2 semesters an will use those semesters to wrap up my major (so may leave only 1 or 2 classes open to take)
    Last edit by VitruvianMan on Dec 29, '13
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  3. Visit  VitruvianMan profile page

    About VitruvianMan

    Joined Jun '13; Posts: 6.

    20 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  Shorty11 profile page
    0
    How many prerequisites will you need to take before being eligible to apply/be accepted to the nursing program(s) you are interested in? I feel that the amount of prereq courses you still need to take will make a difference in your decision, and allow posters to make more informed suggestions for you.
  5. Visit  VitruvianMan profile page
    0
    Well, the thing is every school I had checked are all radically different; some schools, I found out, require a large number of classes like organic chemistry, spanish, biophysics and even music theory (Don't ask, I was confused myself on why the school even put this as a requirement), while some schools only require the most basic classes like chemistry or human anatomy. As for my school? I still need about 4 pre-reqs and they're all "seasonal", meaning one class is in fall and the other is only in spring. The issue with this one is that those classes are dependent on Chemistry, which even if I take it this upcoming semester, I might not even be able to take the other pre-req classes in time.

    To elaborate, my main problem is that I'm not sure if I'll take all, or if any, of the pre-reqs in time, no matter where it is I go, because I only completed those three classes (If we are talking about the most basic pre-reqs, then I'm still short on human nutrition and chemistry and everyone knows how notoriously difficult it is to get in those classes).
  6. Visit  DadStudentPerhaps profile page
    0
    A lot of classes your describing are part of my schools nursing program. A&P 1 and 2 are pre-Reqs.... Nutrition, Human Growth & Development, Micro Biology, etc are part of the program once accepted.
  7. Visit  DoeRN profile page
    0
    Quote from DadStudentPerhaps
    A lot of classes your describing are part of my schools nursing program. A&P 1 and 2 are pre-Reqs.... Nutrition, Human Growth & Development, Micro Biology, etc are part of the program once accepted.
    Every program is different. I had Human Growth and Development, micro and all the other science classes as pre-reqs. I had to take all of these before I was accepted into the program.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
  8. Visit  VitruvianMan profile page
    0
    I'm not sure if everyone here really understands the situation. I'll start from the beginning; I am currently a history major in [insert school name]. The thing is, I want to go into nursing. However, I cannot enter my school's nursing program because I failed to take all the necessary pre-reqs courses by the time I have made my decision; should I attempt to finish all the pre-reqs, I may have to virtually start school all over again. Even if I wanted to get into nursing right now, I may not be able to because I am already 90% there in graduating out of my school with a BA in history, which brings me up to my next plan/issue: going to nursing school after my current undergrad school. However, another problem with that plan; like entry for my school's nursing program, all schools require various requirements, which I am unsure of completing before graduation. It's not just a school I'm afraid about, but many schools because I have not been able to take even the most basic, common reqs (human nutrition and biochemistry). So, I guess the main question is, can anyone help me in what to do to go to a nursing school with only a part of the reqs (list in original post) done? Any comment would be much obliged
    Last edit by VitruvianMan on Dec 30, '13
  9. Visit  DoeRN profile page
    2
    To be honest and I tell a lot of people this especially now. Before you decide to take the nursing school route research your area to make sure new grad nurses are finding jobs. This may help you determine the next step to take. I know it isn't the question you asked but it's something you should discount.

    It's really up to you with the way you want to go about getting into nursing school. Pick a school you would like to attend and get the pre-reqs done for that school. A lot of people can get their pre-reqs completed at a local community college. Some colleges offer an accelerated BSN that you compete if you already have a bachelors in another field. But you still have some pre-reqs you have to fulfill before you can apply.

    So regardless if you start taking the pre-reqs now or after you graduate you have to decide this and again which school you are wanting attend.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
    KatRNBSN2014 and RunBabyRN like this.
  10. Visit  kaydensmom01 profile page
    0
    Decide what you want to do. Decide if you want to go right to a direct entry graduate program or if you want to become a Registered Nurse first. If you want to enter a direct entry program see where there is one around you and look at their requirements. If you meet the gpa/class requirements then apply. If you do not take the classes that you need to take in order to apply, then apply.

    If you want to go into a registered nursing program decide if you want to go into a Associate Degree program, a traditional bachelors program, or an accelerated bachelors program. Whichever program you decide that you want to get into look at their requirements and see if you meet them. The associate degree may have less requirements, but theBachelors may be better for you because you will have a bachelors and may meet their longer requirments. You may have to take classes, no one can tell you if you will or not because it is completely dependent on the program and school that you choose. They won't accept you with part of the pre-req's, but some schools pre-req's can be another schools co-req's. Again it is completely dependent on the program and school that you choose, each one can be vastly different and you are going to have to research each school/program and their individual requirments. Hope this made it a little bit clearer for you.
  11. Visit  VitruvianMan profile page
    0
    Quote from kaydensmom01
    If you want to enter a direct entry program see where there is one around you and look at their requirements. If you meet the gpa/class requirements then apply. If you do not take the classes that you need to take in order to apply, then apply.
    Wait, even if I haven't met the pre-reqs, I should still apply to the school?


    Quote from kaydensmom01
    The associate degree may have less requirements, but theBachelors may be better for you because you will have a bachelors and may meet their longer requirments.
    But what's the difference? I'm sure if both will take you to the RN path, that's good enough isn't it? Wouldn't the AA path be much easier than the other?
  12. Visit  SanSoo profile page
    1
    It seems you may need to take a step back and determine what it is that you want and what are your priorities. While I see that you want to finish your BA in History you do not say how that degree will benefit your future. If you want to pursue and undergraduate nursing program then go for it. If that means your BA in History comes second to your pursuit of a career in nursing only you know which is more important. Set a goal and then create a path to it. As you have seen it is not practical to pursue History and Nursing equally. One has to take priority, which one only you can decide.
    RunBabyRN likes this.
  13. Visit  VitruvianMan profile page
    0
    It appears some people are kind of misreading what I had written. As I mentioned before, my mind is nursing (please read the title of this thread, it very clearly says that). I said the only reason why I am towards to getting a history degree in the first place is because I had initially wanted to go to law school, which I am seriously having second thoughts about and want to pursue nursing (if possible). I just want to make it clear for everyone that I have no intentions of having a future with a history degree, besides to enter any grad-level nursing school if possible.
  14. Visit  Cg37387n profile page
    0
    I would like to point out, that if you are a little nicer you might get better answers. That being said, you can graduate with your BA in History, then continue onto an aBSN. Which is an accelerated Bachelors of Science in Nursing. It's not a Graduate program.. In order to get into a Graduate program for Nursing you need to have a degree in Nursing if I'm not mistaken. While you're finishing your BA in History, see if you can take the pre-reqs to the nursing school you want to attend. Most nursing programs around the area has the same pre-requisites. I wouldn't really go and get an ADN because you will more than likely have a bachelors if you decide to continue with the BA. Call local schools or schools you wish to apply to for nursing and they can tell you all the prerequisites you might need. An ADN program isn't necessarily easier, because you are being taught the fundamentals of nursing and at the end you still need to pass your boards at the end, and schools hold nursing students at a high standard because in order to be accredited they need to have a high pass rate (I believe 85%+). I wish you the best of luck.. I really recommend is to finish that BA in History. Possibly if you cannot finish the pre-reqs at your current university, that you go to a community college where you can do pre-reqs at a fraction of a cost and go for the aBSN.

    Good Luck!
  15. Visit  Heathermaizey profile page
    2
    It seems simple to me. Finish your BA in history. Then look at schools you want to go to for nursing. You will have to complete the prereqs first. That is a fact. Get the prereqs complete and apply to nursing school. There is no I want to be a nurse so I will get into nursing school now, route. If there was I would be a nurse by now.
    RunBabyRN and 203bravo like this.


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