New here, just saying hello!

  1. Hello all,

    I just found this site while doing some research on the www. I am currently enrolled in an EMT-B course and was approached by the school about joining the nursing program. I had not thought about nursing before, but the counselor gave me alot to think about. I would have to go through the entire program which would consist of 2 months of CNA training and licensing and then 53 weeks of LVN training and licensing, and then on to RN school which is at a different school. I am seriously thinking about the program, it is free of charge to me, up through LVN training, and then I would pay for the RN training.

    I am a 43 year old male and was wondering whether or not going through the CNA/LVN training is the best way to go about becoming an RN. Are there many males that are LVN's? Obviously the tuition is attractive to me, and l would think starting at the CNA level and working up would give me an Idea of what the field is like up to an RN.

    I retired 3 years ago from the Real Estate business, and feel that I am too bored being retired. I have always been interested in medicine and thought becoming an EMT would be a good way to break in the field, so to speak. I scored very high on my entrance exam which is why the counselor asked me to consider the nursing program as I met the criteria and would not have to retest. So, 3 days ago this was brought up to me and I will have to make a decision soon, but I would like to pursue the best avenue possible and gain a quality education.

    I guess in a long-winded way, I am asking is this route that most nurses go or do most jump right into an RN program? Since I have absolutely no experience, I would like to hear from those who have gone through training what their toughts are.

  2. 2 Comments

  3. by   athena55
    Hello 650Ryder and Welcome to All Nurses!
    I work in an Army Medical Center (MEDCEN) and we have many, many 68WM6's (LPN's) that are male, took the 68W course (EMT) then went on to the PNC (Practical Nurse Course) and are eventually going on for their RN degree.
    Gosh, if the program is offering you the tuition to attend their CNA program and on for the LPN, well speaking for myself I would jump at the chance!
    Back in the day I went directly to the RN nursing school, right after high school. From my experience (back then) those students who had some type of nursing background (being LPN's first) adjusted quicker and were better prepared then those of us who went in right after high school, or those that went in as an older student (my year we had a religious nun who was 65 years old, lived in a cloister and was given permission to speak for the 2 year course!)
    Hey, no matter what you choose, that is the point, right? That you have that ability to choose! [I was a civilian EMT-B, as well]
    I hope others will be willing to give their POV....Could you maybe make a visit to the LPN program and speak to some of the students there for their input?
    Hey, GOOD LUCK...It kind of seems like a win-win decision you will be making.
  4. by   650ryder
    Thanks for the quick response athena,

    I am thinking along the same lines as you, if they are going to offer me the course at no cost to me, why not? I am already getting the EMT-B training from them at no cost, so it does seem like a win-win situation. My original plans were to get the EMT-B cert and go an to Paramedic school, and eventually go on to become a critical care paramedic, but when this was brought up as an option, I really thought I should give it some serious thought. I have the support of my family, so that is not an issue, of course my son thinks being a Paramedic would be the coolest job in the world, and why would anyone not want to ride around in an ambulance all day long.

    I will take your advice and go to the other forum tomorrow and ask around there. Thanks again for the input. BTW are you in currently in the service? I was in the Army from 85-88 as a 95B (Military Police).