Going back to school... some questions about nursing.

  1. 0
    Hello!
    After dropping out of a traditional 4 year college to get married and have kids and all that, I'm really feeling the urge to get back into school and work towards a career. I have a ridiculous amount of interests and avenues that I would like to pursue, one being nursing, so I'm curious about a few things.
    I see on several of the boards here that it seems that an Associates in Nursing will get you nowhere in a metro area if you're looking to work in a hospital.
    But, I'm not terribly interested in working in a hospital and we live in a rural area.
    I would like to with work in a physician's office, or in a health department, or in a school... maybe someday working towards a higher degree or maybe getting into hospital work as my kids get older.
    So, are things really so bleak for someone like me? If I got my LPN or RN (I'm leaning more to the latter) would it really be such a fight to find a job? I see a lot of advertisements in our town for LPN positions at nursing homes, but is that my only real option?
    Thanks for reading and any advice.
  2. 5 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Good day:

    From my understanding an RN gives you among the greatest flexibility compared to an LPN; both are worth-while goals.

    I've an LPN friend who works in pediatrics, but as you shared, it is more common to see LPN's in long term care facilities.

    Have you thought of checking into the places you want to work to find out what type of nurses they employ?

    Thank you.
  4. 0
    Most Dr offices have very few RNs, couple LPNs, and mostly Medical assistants. Hospitals are getting away from LPNs and using only RNs (BSN) in metro areas and PCTs. You can work rural hospitals with a ASN, if there are few BSN or RN-BSN schools locally. Eventually you will need your BSN.
  5. 0
    Most school nursing positions require a BSN as well.
  6. 0
    Quote from esca0417
    Hello!

    But, I'm not terribly interested in working in a hospital and we live in a rural area.
    I would like to with work in a physician's office, or in a health department, or in a school... maybe someday working towards a higher degree or maybe getting into hospital work as my kids get older.
    So, are things really so bleak for someone like me? If I got my LPN or RN (I'm leaning more to the latter) would it really be such a fight to find a job? I see a lot of advertisements in our town for LPN positions at nursing homes, but is that my only real option?
    Thanks for reading and any advice.
    As Don said, medical offices have little need for RNs; there are a few more LPNs in that setting. However, for the same reasons YOU want to work there, so do many very qualified and experienced nurses. A medical office cannot be your starting hope, it's unlikely to pan out (or, it'd be a fluke rather than a certainty).

    Health Department? If you mean public health nurse, that's for BSN RNs and comes with experience (nearly always) required. And as for the school nurse job?.....nope. BSN as well, typically, and absolutely they want experience....and the fact is, TONS and TONS of nurses who are also parents want these gigs, too, so you'd have to expect to spend some years earning the credentials to be considered for application.

    The reason you see lots of advertisements for LPNs in LTC is because....yes....that's your most likely option. If you become an LPN, hospital positions are either nonexistent or extremely limited, and you can completely forget school nursing and public health nursing.

    One other thought: getting into hospital employment isn't something you do "down the road". The skills needed in acute care are best used fresh out of nursing school.....before time has robbed you of the ability and being "out of the loop" in terms of technique and latest practice info. The time to learn skills needed IN the hospital is early on, not something you do after years in a non-acute setting. At least, it shouldn't be your plan; it isn't a sound one.

    It will take you several years to become an RN, and perhaps by then the job market will have turned around a bit. You can't plan on that, however, and must plan to work hospital shifts when they need you, usually the night shift or off-shifts for newbies. You'll be competing against other new grads who won't have any issues with families, so you have to be flexible to be competitive.

    Good luck in your choices.
  7. 0
    Quote from meeep
    Most school nursing positions require a BSN as well.
    I agree, most school nurse job listings I have seen require a BSN. You could always get your BSN & then get your masters in public health nursing.


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