Are online ANP degrees destroying our credibility? - page 26

by jilljw 64,044 Views | 322 Comments

I was talking to a private practice doctor about an opening in his practice. Currently, I am employed by the hospital. He told me that they will only consider PA's due to having more of a hard science based training and longer... Read More


  1. 1
    I posted this to a different OP but I will repost here as it is just as applicable...

    For those of us poor saps that have chosen to remain in rural America (Kansas here) going to a brick and mortar school is simply not an option. The nearest state school with an NP program is 100 miles away. God bless distance education. Those of us in the styx who desire to advance our education deserve the opportunity to do so and should not be punished because we make the decision to stay in the heartland. My online education was and has been nothing but high quality. If medical schools stopped death-gripping at tradition and utilized new technology to expand the reach of their programs, maybe we could assist in ending some of the primary care shortage out here!
    SycamoreGuy likes this.
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    I have never attended an online educational program, at least not yet. But, it is not distance education that hurts the field. It is low standards in any school, online or brick and mortar. In order to become an NP, one should have attained a 3.0 GPA at the minimum, and if not, taken the GRE to compensate, have at least 2 years of nursing experience, recommendation letters, an essay, etc. Then, once in the program, there needs to be a minimum amount of clinical hours in a variety of places in order to be deemed competent.

    I am looking into Frontier Nursing University, and it looks to be a sound program, listed as number 14 in the country on US News with good reviews from students who have attended the program. They ensure clinical competency through mandatory clinical hours, and have mandatory on-site meetings at the beginning of the program, and the beginning of the clinical portion. Admission, I read, is competitive. Sounds like the student is responsible for setting up their clinical portion, but they still have preceptors monitoring progress, etc. If an NP student can't figure out how to set up a good clinical component with a variety to make them well prepared, then they lack the initiative to be in the program.

    There are great online schools, and great brick and mortar schools, and low quality programs in each category.
    zmansc likes this.
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    As a new grad getting feedback from different employers, I haven't heard any negatives about those graduating from online programs bc in the end the actual clinical hours are done, and they have been interested in where clinical time has been spent, etc...Something I've seen hinder some of my friends from getting jobs is the lack of RN experience before getting their Masters...When I went into grad school I didn't even realize you could get into a APN program without working first as an RN...

    Some of the local schools in my area that are NOT online have a lot lacking that some of the online programs do have, so I'm not totally one to rule out online programs...I graduated from my state university and when comparing my program to other NPs I've met over clinical hours I've been impressed with some of the online program requirements...
  4. 0
    I did my RN-BSN completion through an online program and currently I am doing my ACNP through a "traditional" program. A few thoughts about this whole thing: Being an online/distant educated student requires, IMHO, a higher level of organization and motivation when compared to onsite programs. It's also true that a certain amount of learning happens in the classroom, especially within discussions with classmates, yet many online programs are discovering this and trying to bring this to the 'net. I agree with the consensus that many private and for-profit programs are starting to erode at our credibility...now if we can stop all the infighting that trying to determine our "best education" credentials and stop changing the alphabet soup behind our names....that's a wholly different matter.

    Ask your doctor if he/she ever heard of telemedicine. If you cannot educate someone over Wi-Fi, how could you possibly treat them?
  5. 0
    Quote from CoolhandHutch
    I did my RN-BSN completion through an online program and currently I am doing my ACNP through a "traditional" program. A few thoughts about this whole thing: Being an online/distant educated student requires, IMHO, a higher level of organization and motivation when compared to onsite programs. It's also true that a certain amount of learning happens in the classroom, especially within discussions with classmates, yet many online programs are discovering this and trying to bring this to the 'net. I agree with the consensus that many private and for-profit programs are starting to erode at our credibility...now if we can stop all the infighting that trying to determine our "best education" credentials and stop changing the alphabet soup behind our names....that's a wholly different matter.

    Ask your doctor if he/she ever heard of telemedicine. If you cannot educate someone over Wi-Fi, how could you possibly treat them?
    Very good reasoning!
  6. 1
    I'm in an online program (for the most part). We sometimes have to go to campus, a dedicated brick and mortar institution that is well ranked nationally, but I'd rather be in most classes. I think the research, theory, and filler classes are fine online, but although I've learned a lot and put effort into it I know that you could open your book, take an online test, pass it, and move on with an A without having learned anything or at least retaining anything. For the practice-crucial courses I'd rather be in a classroom with a veteran instructor. I think PA, MD, and a host of others will maintain more credibility, in the inner circle, because they are actual classes. Even the DNP crutch that will supposedly shore up nursing professionalism is almost always online and wrought with filler classes such as research, leadership, theory, etc. Those are all good and necessary, but they don't have an immediate impact on making patients well which is what RN, APN, PA, MD, DDS, and many other initials are on the Earth to do.

    Edit to add: clinicals are actual, and procedural training such as suturing, I & D, radiograph, 12 lead, etc are all in person.
    Tinabeanrn likes this.
  7. 0
    When they start online med schools and PA schools, then maybe I'll listen. Until then, it's the rocko & sluggo school of turntable repair, time.
  8. 1
    Quote from nursetim
    When they start online med schools and PA schools, then maybe I'll listen. Until then, it's the rocko & sluggo school of turntable repair, time.
    Many med school students, way more than you can imagine, skip med school classes and wait till their instructors posts the videos. A lot of our homework references at Rush university were videos from prestigious medical schools. The reason I learned physical exams so fast was because I could watch a video countless times till I had it down as well as the doc performing it. In clinical my doc told me I didn't have to be so thorough for the "real world."
    SycamoreGuy likes this.
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    Quote from nursetim
    When they start online med schools and PA schools, then maybe I'll listen. Until then, it's the rocko & sluggo school of turntable repair, time.
    I have yet to have anyone explain to me the difference between sitting in a crowded, stadium style room, barely being able to hear what's going on and sitting comfortably in my computer chair, where I can pause, replay, or adjust the volume. Clinicals, practicals, and labs obviously need to be in person, but there is no need to be physically present to get everything out of a lecture.
    SHGR likes this.
  10. 0
    What Sycamore said.


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