Drug seeking- something to ponder - page 2

I have been a nurse for over 20 years and I have seen nursing change over the last 20 years for sure. I obviously am very aware of the rampant drug problem that we are facing. I too have been... Read More

  1. by   lisacsu84
    I too suffer from chronic pain. I recently came across a doctor while in the hospital after surgery, she was amazing and gave me a nugget of thought that ERa and doctors should know. We could not get my pain under control and I was miserable, not only Sid she treat me fantastic she also increased the dosages of my maintenance meds. She said that when a chronic pain person has an acute injury/surgery etc the maintenance dose will not control the acute problem and needs to be adjusted like wise. Everybody assumes we already have meds at home but if the pain is acute it is not going to help. I wish people would research ask or do anything before they judge. I feel for everybody in this thread
  2. by   toomuchbaloney
    Our current health system created a problem with irresponsible use of opiates, in much the same way that we have created super bugs.
    Now we are trying to just remove access to the drugs for people who need them.
    It is no secret that the indiscriminate and poorly monitored use of opiates contributes significantly to the increase in heroin use in this country. Heroin is cheaper and easier to get once the docs decide you can no longer be prescribed percocet or <fill in the blank>.
  3. by   No Stars In My Eyes
    Ahh, jeeezzz!
    Sure, yeah, just cram the genie back into the bottle, right?
    That'll make the problem disappear, right?
    If nobody has access to the meds, that'll solve everything, right?
    Pffft.
  4. by   KatieMI
    Quote from No Stars In My Eyes
    Ahh, jeeezzz!
    Sure, yeah, just cram the genie back into the bottle, right?
    That'll make the problem disappear, right?
    If nobody has access to the meds, that'll solve everything, right?
    Pffft.
    Well, not precisely so but still...

    The thing is, opioids are LESS effective for fibromyalgia than early complex treatment consisting of stretch, yoga, accupuncture, hydrotherapy, normal natural sleep and diet rich in eicosanoids. For this reason, fibromyalgia basically does not exist in Asian region - or, rather, it is treated early and routinely there. I was shocked when in Japan in ordinary public bath I was offered sort of massage specifically designed for it (I did not speak Japanese but the hot stones were placed precisely at the points, and there was a long line of ladies to that particular massage master).
    That sort of treatment is rare and difficult to find in the USA, it is in fact semi-legal and costs tens of thousands of dollars, out of pocket. 98+% of patients either have no idea about it all, or cannot locate practitioners, or can't afford it, so they go to an average Dr. Joe, MD, who scares them with horror stories of not enough evidence of this and that and then puts them on Vicodin, Xanax and Soma. Then it only remains to pray the God so that the patients would not escalate, overdose, need more of other habit forming drugs, etc. While the problem is that patients should not be put on these drugs to begin with.

    There should not be restricted access to pain killers for people who really need them. But there are patients who should be given alternatives, work release permit (paid in full or duty change) and high quality PT/OT first and second, and only considered for opioids as final option. Most of "criptogenic back pain", "fibromyalgia", "myofascial syndrome" and many other conditions belong to this category. Just today, I saw a patient with esophageal spasm. It is treatable by calcium channel blockers, peppermint oil and/or nitroglycerine, but her lazy primary care refused to order tests. She is heavily dependent on quick release oral opioids and benzos now.
  5. by   No Stars In My Eyes
    I would be quite amenable to any available alternative therapies like you mentioned.
    But, NOT EVERYONE is abusing their prescriptions. Some people are actually able to use the meds, PRN, during an acute episode of pain, for the reason given, without taking any more than prescribed, and have no problem taking/using it for the time period prescribed, and then, even if there are 'leftover' Vicodin tablets or whatever, stepping down to an OTC.
    Simple.
    We are not all raging addicts whose only desire is more, more, MORE...pills, dosages, etc.

    Medication is medication when it is used as ordered, with discrimination, for a finite period.
    Drug-seeking is certainly a problem because some are more into getting 'high'.
    But 'some' does not equal all.
  6. by   JordanRose
    Our office is part of a larger health care network. "ACME" health network policy is that any patient who has more than 2 narcotic prescriptions written for chronic pain are required to sign a controlled medication contract. Patients are subject to random drug screen tests at any time. You can also be asked to bring your prescription bottle in for a pill count at any time. It is pretty much standard operating procedures anymore. It stinks for those who are following the rules, but a few bad apples have ruined it for everyone.
  7. by   No Stars In My Eyes
    Everyone is guilty unless proven innocent by random, mandatory checks, and even then they are under suspicion because WE CAN DRUG TEST YOU AT ANY TIME, just because.
  8. by   anitalaff
    Quote from JordanRose
    It stinks for those who are following the rules, but a few bad apples have ruined it for everyone.
    This is not third grade. That argument needs to be debunked.

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