help! Are surgical techs and RNs the same?? - page 8

I am an operating room nurse at a rather large hospital. This facility has made it so that the Surgical techs and the RNs are pretty much equal. Therefore i am often talked to with disrespect and... Read More

  1. by   Sarah, RNBScN
    What are tech's? What is their training? I have never heard of them before.

    We don't have them where I work. We used to have RPN's (formerly RNA's) work in this role as a scrub nurse but did away with them.

    Sarah
  2. by   mcorrao77
    Okay, this may be a stupid question, but I have to ask. Does a RNFA act in the same role as the scrub or circulating nurse? What is the difference with a RNFA? I thought, I could be way off base, that you had to go for more schooling to be a RNFA. Is that not true?
  3. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    An RNFA can do the same things as a scrub or circulator, but they can also suture, handling tissue, providing exposure, using instruments, and providing hemostasis. An RNFA has taken a course (yes you do go for more schooling, it's not very long though) for this and has a certification to do these things. It also varies state to state what can and cannot be done.
  4. by   mobilsurgrn
    issues like this get where they are (in an or suite) for one reason. leaders have lost the ability to lead. twenty years ago, many leaders rose to their positions because their peers, surgeons and hospital leaders recognized that person’s ability to get people to work together. those who have been around for a while know i mean. a little gray in the temples or a little swagger in the step, but with one glance you knew that you were out of line and you respected that person so much, you stopped acting out and got your rear-end back in line.

    it seems now that leaders aren’t cultivated, they are appointed. i have managed operating rooms for over twenty-five years now. i am an associates degree nurse. what i learned about getting people to work together, i learned by doing the work, and from being mentored by some very generous managers- not by sitting in a classroom. and, the one thing that every one of these leaders taught me was that you can’t manage an operating room suite from your office. if you are on the halls, in the rooms and other areas (pacu, spd, etc) talking to your team, issues get resolved. it is my responsibility to fix systems issues so people can get their work done. it is my responsibility to confront surgeons who misbehave and it is easier to do this at the scrub sink. it’s simple but not necessarily easy. if mangers do their part and systems work, people generally don’t act out. if they do then you deal with them one on one and expect them to fix their individual, personal issues. if they can’t do that then you manage them out of their position. you can’t allow toxic people to create a toxic work environment. this can be done whether your staff is union or non-union.

    i hear a lot about generation x,y,z or whatever and their respective idyo’s but one thing never changes -good leaders make people feel valued and people who feel valued know that whatever their role, tech, nurse, surgeon, housekeeper and yes even anesthesiologist, their function is in the end- to heal. when leaders allow people to lose sight of that, they lose their department. hold your leader accountable and when they fix stuff, show them some love.
    Last edit by mobilsurgrn on Dec 31, '05
  5. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from mcorrao77
    okay, this may be a stupid question, but i have to ask. does a rnfa act in the same role as the scrub or circulating nurse? what is the difference with a rnfa? i thought, i could be way off base, that you had to go for more schooling to be a rnfa. is that not true?
    role of the rnfa

    working interdependently with the operating room surgeon the registered nurse first assistant (rnfa) is a technically skilled nursing professional with advanced education that renders direct patient care as part of the perioperative nursing process. collaborating with the surgeon for an optimal surgical outcome, the rnfa assists in positioning, draping, providing exposure, handling tissue, suture and maintaining hemostatis. the scope of practice for rnfas is regulated by the individual state's nurse practice act, and rnfa's must practice within these guidelines.

    reference
  6. by   mcorrao77
    Thanks for the input Marie LPN and Corvette Guy!
  7. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from mcorrao77
    thanks for the input marie lpn and corvette guy!
    your welcome & have a
    happy new year!
  8. by   stevierae
    Quote from mobilsurgrn

    Hold your leader accountable and when they fix stuff, show them some love.

    I agree with the "hold them accountable" part. That's why management gets the big bucks.

    I don't agree with calling management our "leader(s.)"

    I also don't agree that it's necessary (or even appropriate) to be confronting ANYONE at the scrub sink before they scrub in, for WHATEVER the issue is. All that does is create tension and possibly anger on the part of the person who is confronted--and that's not appropriate for someone getting ready to focus his or her attention on an operation. Issues can be dealt with privately. Personally, if I had a problem with a surgeon, anesthesiologist, or co-worker, I'd take it up with him privately, and expect him to do the same for me. Neither of us needs to run to management and "tattle" and I find it somewhat patronizing that you think any of us want or need your intervention or "help." Also, we are quite adept at fixing our own "problems," whatever they may be, in our rooms. Most of the surgeons I've worked with would have told you to F*** off if you confronted them at the scrub sink.

    When will management ever get it? They are not our "friends." Most places are like this---the surgeons, anesthesiologists, RNs and techs are a team. We stick together against our mutual enemy--management, who generally has one thing in mind---cutting the budget to the bone to satisfy the higher ups in hospital administration and turn a higher profit.

    "Show them some love?" Please! If you need "positive strokes" I think you need to get a life outside the operating room.
    Last edit by stevierae on Jan 8, '06
  9. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from stevierae
    Originally Posted by mobilsurgrn
    Hold your leader accountable and when they fix stuff, show them some love.
    ---
    I agree with the "hold them accountable" part. That's why management gets the big bucks.

    I don't agree with calling management our "leader(s.)"

    I also don't agree that it's necessary (or even appropriate) to be confronting ANYONE at the scrub sink before they scrub in, for WHATEVER the issue is. All that does is create tension and possibly anger on the part of the person who is confronted--and that's not appropriate for someone getting ready to focus his or her attention on an operation. Issues can be dealt with privately. Personally, if I had a problem with a surgeon, anesthesiologist, or co-worker, I'd take it up with him privately, and expect him to do the same for me. Neither of us needs to run to management and "tattle" and I find it somewhat patronizing that you think any of us want or need your intervention or "help." Also, we are quite adept at fixing our own "problems," whatever they may be, in our rooms. Most of the surgeons I've worked with would have told you to F*** off if you confronted them at the scrub sink.

    When will management ever get it? They are not our "friends." Most places are like this---the surgeons, anesthesiologists, RNs and techs are a team. We stick together against our mutual enemy--management, who generally has one thing in mind---cutting the budget to the bone to satisfy the higher ups in hospital administration and turn a higher profit.

    "Show them some love?" Please! If you need "positive strokes" I think you need to get a life outside the operating room.
    Hello Stevierae,

    I will try to not be as harsh here with my reply d/t tact is a wonderful message board tool. ["...get a life..." ]

    Your focus on "show them some love" was taken out of context, IMHO. My interpretation of mobilsurgrn's post is to show appreciation towards leadership staff when they hold true to their responsibilities. IMHO, everyone deserves recognition & appreciation when earned.

  10. by   Red Kroovy
    AORN Position Statement...

    "AORN believes individuals who are not licensed to practice professional nursing and who perform in the role of scrub person are performing a delegated technical function under the direct supervision of a perioperative registered nurse."

  11. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from Red Kroovy
    AORN Position Statement...

    "AORN believes individuals who are not licensed to practice professional nursing and who perform in the role of scrub person are performing a delegated technical function under the direct supervision of a perioperative registered nurse."





  12. by   joshrissasmom
    Hi I don't know where you live/work, but I live in Atlantic Canada and to be a surgical tech you must already be an LPN as a prerequisite. So when you talk about a license on the line I am assuming the ST's where you live have no license? I am training to be a ST here now and we have to retain our LPN license in order to work as an ST, so here we also have a license to protect! I currently work fulltime in the OR, as an ST while I am doing my course and I feel we the ST'S and the RN's seem to work well together and don't judge each other on our level of training, we are all here for the same reason and we all have a job to do why can't everyone just respect each other's education and do our jobs!! Not everyone aspires to be an RN... I myself enjoy my job as an LPN/ST and don't have any plans on training to be an RN. We are all important no matter what our jobs are!!

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