Bovid smoke and plume

  1. 0
    I just started in the OR, and am so excited! There is one problem, I didn't realize how bad the plume smoke would be. When I spent a day shadowing an OR nurse, there we're nothing but lap procedures, and there wasn't any. So I signedd on to the job, and have spent every day feeling like I will either vomit or pass out in a cold sweat. Does this get any better? I tried using some tea tree oil in my mask, and I guess it helped a little bit, but it was still there! Sometimes our tech will suction it up, but often times not. Help!

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  2. 17 Comments...

  3. 0
    I am confident that you meant "bovie" smoke, right?

    If you feel nauseated from the smell, perhaps you can use something stronger on your mask, like mastisol. If you are very sensitive to smells, you can also invest in a small jar of Vick's Vap-o-Rub to put on right under your nose BEFORE you put your mask on. Make sure your mask is tight, and then tape the mask to the bridge of your nose.

    There are such things as smoke evacuators, but they are expensive and are mainly used during procedures such as condyloma removal.

    Bovies are regularly used in the OR. If this becomes a real problem for you, ask your NM for some suggestions. We don't want you either throwing up or passing out!
  4. 0
    Yes, I meant 'bovine' smoke! I can't seem to edit my last post. I've haven't tried vapo-rub, thanks for the advise. Nobody else seems bothered by the smoke, but I hate it! I'm hoping that it gets better because I can't feel this way forever.
  5. 1
    For the occasional "bovie" smoke and smelly code browns, I would dab the outside of my mask with mint toothpaste. I always kept a small tube of it handy. Always helped me.
    SandraCVRN likes this.
  6. 0
    We use wintergreen oil on the outside of the masks, the circulator can apply it for everyone who needs it, just put it on a finger and rub it on the outside of the mask near the nose area.

    When I scrub, the surgeons sometimes get annoyed because I try to make sure I use either the suction or the smoke evacuator because I believe that breathing smoke plume from anything (possible cancerous tissue) can be hazardous. Think: second hand smoke...
  7. 2
    Quote from canesdukegirl
    I am confident that you meant "bovie" smoke, right?

    If you feel nauseated from the smell, perhaps you can use something stronger on your mask, like mastisol. If you are very sensitive to smells, you can also invest in a small jar of Vick's Vap-o-Rub to put on right under your nose BEFORE you put your mask on. Make sure your mask is tight, and then tape the mask to the bridge of your nose.

    There are such things as smoke evacuators, but they are expensive and are mainly used during procedures such as condyloma removal.

    Bovies are regularly used in the OR. If this becomes a real problem for you, ask your NM for some suggestions. We don't want you either throwing up or passing out!
    Smoke evacuation is standard in all procedures in the OR that I work in(Canada). Cautery smoke is a CARCINOGEN!!!!
    scrubb14 and ButtonNose like this.
  8. 2
    Yess!! In Canada ALL surgical plume is evacuated using a smoke evacuator- this is a basic requirement and part of out ORNAC standards as perioperative nurses. Surgical plume contains viruses/bacteria and cellular debris/blood in it. Numerous studies have proven that breathing that toxic plume in is equivalent to smoking unfiltered cigarettes. The plume is a known carcinogen. If your facility is not evacuating plume each and every time it is present they are not only putting the patients life at risk but also their staff!
    joyjoy1555 and scrubb14 like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from Adirondacknurse
    Yes, I meant 'bovine' smoke!
    You roast pigs on a smoker in your OR? *giggle*

    As for me...I love the smell of cauterized flesh in the morning....

    No, but seriously, if the Bovie smoke is bad, I suction it away. I've had some doctors that don't like me poking my frasier in there, so in that case, I just...back away a little bit. That ****'s not good for you. I have never heard of a smoke evacuator.
    Last edit by dianah on Jan 10, '14 : Reason: Terms of Service
  10. 2
    I know it's a little long but it is a study about plume smoke


    Smoke from tissue burning tools like lasers can be toxic to surgical team
    By: The Canadian Press March 18, 2009
    TORONTO—The surgeon touches an area of exposed flesh with a cauterizing tool for less than a minute, sending up a cloud of noxious smoke that quickly wafts across the room and catches at the eyes and throat.
    It is only a demonstration—the flesh is actually raw turkey—but the result illustrates the hazard that doctors, nurses and even patients can be exposed to during operations that employ lasers and other tissue-burning tools.
    Known as “plume,” the smoke is laden with all manner of potentially toxic substances and disease-causing microbes that can make their way past surgical masks and into the lungs.
    “According to one study, exposure to (vapours from) one gram of laser-cut tissue is like smoking three unfiltered cigarettes,” said Suzanne Kiraly, president of the Canadian Standards Association (CSA), which on Wednesday released new guidelines for capturing and disposing surgical plume.

    http://www.thestar.com/Comment/article/604877
    Last edit by dianah on Jul 1, '12 : Reason: Terms of Service
    ButtonNose and scrubb14 like this.
  11. 0
    Quote from ChristineAdrianaRN
    You roast pigs on a smoker in your OR? *giggle*

    As for me...I love the smell of cauterized flesh in the morning....

    No, but seriously, if the Bovie smoke is bad, I suction it away. I've had some doctors that don't like me poking my frasier in there, so in that case, I just...back away a little bit. That ****'s not good for you. I have never heard of a smoke evacuator.
    Bovine = Cattle
    Last edit by dianah on Jan 10, '14


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