About BSN Degrees

  1. I wanted to get an MSN degree, but I think that may come later in life. Nevertheless, I want to get a BSN degree now. I find it very difficult to determine where I should get a degree from. Schools all seem to tout their CCNE certification, but no one talks about being regionally accredited. Even schools that are regionally accredited that doesn't mean their online RN-BSN program is, but it IS CCNE accredited.

    My goal, ultimately is to teach CNA classes or some equivalent thereof (patient care tech, nurse extender, what have you.) I would also like to teach CPR and ACLS. I wouldn't mind teaching at a junior college, but only as an adjunct instructor, and I really don't need to do that. I want to get at would-be nurses when they're young--so to speak.

    With what I've said, does anyone have any advice on how I should go about getting my BSN? Or any other advice you have would be greatly appreciated.
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   meanmaryjean
    If a school is regionally accredited- the entire school and all of its degrees are regionally accredited. Nursing programs advertise their CCNE accreditation, because that is what students look for.

    You actually don't need anything special in terms of degrees to teach BLS/ ACLS. You get that instructor training from the AHA and an affiliated center (typically a hospital, but sometimes a fire department or health department).
  4. by   EGspirit
    Thanks. I appreciate that advice.
  5. by   NurseSpeedy
    Quote from meanmaryjean
    If a school is regionally accredited- the entire school and all of its degrees are regionally accredited. Nursing programs advertise their CCNE accreditation, because that is what students look for.

    You actually don't need anything special in terms of degrees to teach BLS/ ACLS. You get that instructor training from the AHA and an affiliated center (typically a hospital, but sometimes a fire department or health department).
    Yeah, when I had to renew my BLS on my own every two years I would take the course and the instructors have been RNs, paramedics, etc. No need for a BSN or higher.

    I have seen some CNA programs taught by Associate degree nurses.

    As far as schools go, my understanding is regional accreditation (such as SACS here in the south) and CCNE are the standards for transferring credits. Careful with the waiting thing though. So many schools are adding time limits to credits stating they "expire" and force a retake in order to have it count toward a higher degree. Usually it's the science and math courses but it stinks to have to pay to take it all over again.
  6. by   EGspirit
    Quote from NurseSpeedy
    Yeah, when I had to renew my BLS on my own every two years I would take the course and the instructors have been RNs, paramedics, etc. No need for a BSN or higher.

    I have seen some CNA programs taught by Associate degree nurses.

    As far as schools go, my understanding is regional accreditation (such as SACS here in the south) and CCNE are the standards for transferring credits. Careful with the waiting thing though. So many schools are adding time limits to credits stating they "expire" and force a retake in order to have it count toward a higher degree. Usually it's the science and math courses but it stinks to have to pay to take it all over again.
    I appreciate your insights. I was just out walking and thinking about it, and I think a BSN may be the terminal degree for me. If I could do adjunct instructing with that, then I would, but if I can't, I think there are enough other avenues I could pursue if I want to instruct. My heart is set on CNA-type students anyway. I think for me, an MSN might just be too much money and come too late in life to really be worthwhile for me. But who knows? I certainly won't slam any doors on it.

    Again, thank you for your response here.

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