Little Brother - page 3

by SoldierNurse22 12,229 Views | 33 Comments

It was a story I'd seen before: 19-year-old airman, T-cell lymphoma, air evac'd from overseas after a plethora of symptoms led to the discovery of his cancer .I headed boldly into the room, my orientee close behind me. A young... Read More


  1. 1
    Beautifully written, such a heartwarming story... Thank you!
    SoldierNurse22 likes this.
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    You are a great writer and I am glad that you finally were able to connect with him. However, I think that a nurse should never take personally how a patient behaves towards their efforts to emotionally support them. Being diagnosed with cancer at 19 or with any other chronic condition at that young age is extremely difficult, and people will grieve how they want, irregardless of who is helping them. They may never appreciate your help because they are fixated in their own grief. Walk a mile in someone else's moccassins. How would you have acted at that age, being perfectly healthy before, and now you are all alone dealing with it by yourself? I don't think that any patient owes their nurse anything, it's our job, but it is nice to be shown appreciation from time to time. That's just my opinion, because I was myself diagnosed with a chronic condition at 18 and I was hospitalized multiple times, and that is what made me want to become a nurse. Dealing with illness is highly personal and you shouldn't judge people or be hurt that they dont want to talk to you. They are dealing with much more than not being appreciated. Empathize. Also, people may not have the courage to deal with their situation enough to even verbally thank you, but I am sure one day, they will come to terms with their health and appreciate your help.
    hotdemos likes this.
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    Thank you for sharing!
    SoldierNurse22 likes this.
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    Thanks to all who posted in reply. I greatly appreciate your replies and your willingness to relate with your own stories. It is nothing short of a blessing for me to know that I have perhaps in some way encouraged you or made you remember why you became a nurse. In the day to day madness that is our profession, it can be easy to lose the motivation that predated the motions.

    Nurseladybug12, I would tend to agree with the theory laid out in your post. However, I am no robot. While I strive to empathize with my patients, I am a human nurse with feelings as well, and despite your objection to my honest conveyance of those feelings, I sense that they are emotions that many (if not all) nurses experience at some point in their careers.

    It was indeed my intent to lay bare my soul when it came to my emotional struggle while caring for this young patient. That is, in my opinion, one of the most important things for nurses to do, especially those of us who are young in our field and need to acknowledge the feelings that come with the intimate act of caregiving. Please keep allnurses.com a safe place for nurses to come and vent, decompress and learn without facing condescention. Should you have further concern for my professionalism or my compassion/empathy, please reread my post and see that my venting did in fact happen in private among trusted coworkers, that I continued to give everything I had to this patient, and that I learned a great deal, as evidenced by the final paragraphs of my post.
    VivaLasViejas and nkochrn like this.
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    What a wonderful encouraging story, and so well written. it reminds me of some days when I wonder why I do this job. Thank you!
    SoldierNurse22 likes this.
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    Beautiful Story! I have been wondering lately how people can work in oncology all day, while I watch my Dad battle his cancer. I am sooo thankful for wonderful compassionate nurses like you!
    SoldierNurse22 likes this.
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    i cried as i read this-not only for this pt. and all of u, but, for my dad who was diagnosed and passed 4 months later. i cried because of my anger as a daughter and as a nurse. now on the other side of it-if possible-it has given me another layer of compassion that i never knew i had.
    SoldierNurse22 likes this.
  8. 1
    I agree 100% with nurseladybug12 "You are a great writer and I am glad that you finally were able to connect with him. However, I think that a nurse should never take personally how a patient behaves towards their efforts to emotionally support them." In response to the statement, "Please keep allnurses.com a safe place for nurses to come and vent, decompress and learn without facing condescention." Please do not post if you do not want honest feedback.
    Last edit by hotdemos on Sep 6, '12 : Reason: typo
    nurseladybug12 likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from hotdemos
    I agree 100% with nurseladybug12 "You are a great writer and I am glad that you finally were able to connect with him. However, I think that a nurse should never take personally how a patient behaves towards their efforts to emotionally support them." In response to the statement, "Please keep allnurses.com a safe place for nurses to come and vent, decompress and learn without facing condescention." Please do not post if you do not want honest feedback.
    Honest feedback is hardly my enemy (as my own post should show). If you will take a moment to read my initial reply to nurseladybug12, I in fact agreed with the opinion espoused that post. However, I wanted to clarify that, while this is a great thing to strive for, nurses are still human and will absolutely feel the way I did sometimes when caring for patients. It doesn't make it right or wrong, it's just a fact.
    Last edit by SoldierNurse22 on Sep 6, '12
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    Quote from nkochrn
    Beautiful Story! I have been wondering lately how people can work in oncology all day, while I watch my Dad battle his cancer. I am sooo thankful for wonderful compassionate nurses like you!
    Best of luck to your Dad and your entire family. Cancer is one of those things that doesn't just affect the patient--it affects everyone around them.


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