How long can port-a-cath go without flushing - pg.2 | allnurses

How long can port-a-cath go without flushing - page 2

i work for home health. i have a patient who has a VAD (port-a-cath, lifeport) which was due to be flushed the end of last month. she was in the hospital and it didnt' get flushed. i am telling her... Read More

  1. Visit  IVRUS profile page
    #13 1
    Quote from thecooperhouse
    I'm a student and I have a question - what would you do you if you had a patient like the above that went a year or more without getting the port flushed?

    I know someone said they wouldn't flush it - so what would you do?

    Thanks!
    Well, I still would NOT flush it, but rather I'd aspirate first and if I could pull off 7cc or so of blood discard then I'd be okay with flushing. No blood return = No flush. And I'd watch the patient for s/s of the "septic storm".
  2. Visit  OCNRN63 profile page
    #14 0
    Depending on the dx., some onc. recommend keeping the port in for a while after treatment is finished if there's a high likelihood of recurrence.
  3. Visit  asorn profile page
    #15 0
    Never think your patient doesn't have knowledge of their own illnesses and interventions. Always go to a "reliable" source to find your answer. Here is an example of one site that is research based ("reliable"). It proves some caterers have a longer flush interval than others (your patients knowledge about her type of catheter) and technique and standards for flushing. Remember that as RNs we are held accoutable to perform according to regulatory standards. The Joint Commission and Medicare refers to CDC guidelines often for certain alements such as this and UTI related to catheters Central Venous Catheters | Infection Control and Prevention Plan for Outpatient Oncology Settings | HAI | CDC
    Last edit by asorn on Dec 28, '15 : Reason: forgot to include link.
  4. Visit  IVRUS profile page
    #16 0
    Quote from asorn
    Never think your patient doesn't have knowledge of their own illnesses and interventions. Always go to a "reliable" source to find your answer. Here is an example of one site that is research based ("reliable"). It proves some caterers have a longer flush interval than others (your patients knowledge about her type of catheter) and technique and standards for flushing. Remember that as RNs we are held accoutable to perform according to regulatory standards. The Joint Commission and Medicare refers to CDC guidelines often for certain alements such as this and UTI related to catheters Central Venous Catheters | Infection Control and Prevention Plan for Outpatient Oncology Settings | HAI | CDC
    Though much of the information on this site is appropriate, however, some of the statements are not in line with Infusion Nurses Society Standards (INS). New Standards will be out this year and will clarify and dispel some inaccuracies.
  5. Visit  BD-RN profile page
    #17 0
    I would simply inform the patient of the standard of care, and that it won't hurt to flush it. This way the patient has a lower risk of it clogging and needing tpa.
  6. Visit  tblackstockrn profile page
    #18 1
    Our protocol is 6-8 weeks.
  7. Visit  summerly profile page
    #19 0
    I work in onc port draw. We recommend 6-8 weeks as well

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