What's is like working for Carestar

  1. 0
    Anyone have an experience working with them?

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  2. 25 Comments...

  3. 0
    i am curious about that too. a friend started working for them a year or so ago and quit because she felt she was not doing real care but rather had to focus on reducing services.
  4. 0
    I work for carestar and they are just like any other place that works with the state.. Overworked and scatterbrained!!! They haven't helped me do anything! But you gotta do what ya gotta do!
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    The truth should be told. Working for Carestar is the most horrible and awful job a nurse could have. First, they are EXTREMELY manipulative. If you don't cut services or do their dirty work, they make your life unbearable and will find reasons to write you up. If the state gets upset about something, Carestar management will not take any responsibility for it. They will blame you and hang you out to dry ALL BY YOURSELF. They expect you to work all hours of the day and night and will NOT pay you for any overtime. They make you responsible for EVERYTHING. You will no longer have a family life or time to enjoy life. You will see consumers who desperately need services and be told to give them the less amount of services possible. Most case managers are on some type of depression medication, and I know at least two case managers who have thought about suicide, and two or three others who are addicted to narcotics. If you quit or get fired, you can't work for any home health agency for six months. They monitor your computer usage, when and how often you enter web-based communication notes, and your telephone. Even though you work at home, you are always traveling or being monitored. If you can honestly say that you could live for a job and it wouldn't bother you to deny a dying disabled person a few more hours of care a day, then this is definitely the job for you. If you have a heart, you better look elsewhere because they will destroy it. And as for the independent providers, they do make fun of you behind your backs, and they enjoy nailing you for ANYTHING they suspect is fraud. Take it from someone who's been there-STAY AWAY!!
  6. 0
    WOW! What a terrible situation for consumers and nurses. I hope you are not employed by this group now.
  7. 0
    Quote from Prittle13
    The truth should be told. Working for Carestar is the most horrible and awful job a nurse could have. First, they are EXTREMELY manipulative. If you don't cut services or do their dirty work, they make your life unbearable and will find reasons to write you up. If the state gets upset about something, Carestar management will not take any responsibility for it. They will blame you and hang you out to dry ALL BY YOURSELF. They expect you to work all hours of the day and night and will NOT pay you for any overtime. They make you responsible for EVERYTHING. You will no longer have a family life or time to enjoy life. You will see consumers who desperately need services and be told to give them the less amount of services possible. Most case managers are on some type of depression medication, and I know at least two case managers who have thought about suicide, and two or three others who are addicted to narcotics. If you quit or get fired, you can't work for any home health agency for six months. They monitor your computer usage, when and how often you enter web-based communication notes, and your telephone. Even though you work at home, you are always traveling or being monitored. If you can honestly say that you could live for a job and it wouldn't bother you to deny a dying disabled person a few more hours of care a day, then this is definitely the job for you. If you have a heart, you better look elsewhere because they will destroy it. And as for the independent providers, they do make fun of you behind your backs, and they enjoy nailing you for ANYTHING they suspect is fraud. Take it from someone who's been there-STAY AWAY!!




    Working as a home health aide, I believe all that is said. I have seen so many clients who need this and that etc but have been told several times "no". Every now and then, having been pressed, carestar might send out the cheapest minimal item necessary. Anything major will not be provided. It's sad but true.
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    I am confused. I am an independent provider thru Carestar. I am my own boss. I take care of my patient, keep my documents, no problems, and report to an independent registered nurse, not Carestar. Get paid from the state, not Carestar.

    To be an independent provider you need to sign up thru Carestar, and Carestar gets you registered with the State of Ohio. But you ARE NOT an employee of Carestar. Your boss is your client.
  9. 0
    Guess Prittle is one unhappy CareStar employee. I too work at CareStar but I have had a very different experience.

    Let's go one step at a time. CareStar doesn't exist to cut services. It exists to manage the services that the consumer needs. I don't know what region Prittle was in but this ain't how things are where I am. I have not known CS to be manipulative or to hang anyone out to dry. The people and supervisors I know have been very supportive.

    As to expecting you to work all hours of the day, I was told to do exactly the opposite. I was told to work my 8 hour day, period. I was told not to answer my phone or check my email after 5. During my orientation, this was stressed time and again by various presenters. CS told me that family comes first and that is what I have seen in practice.

    Giving the least amount of services possible is what the program is about. Why? Because that is the need. Anything beyond the least amount of services needed becomes a want. The program exists to meet needs, not wants. If everyone got their wants met then the State would go broke and no one would get their needs met. So, which do you want? You want to meet the wants of a few or the needs of the many? I'll take the needs of the many.

    Most case managers are depressed and on meds? This is an issue in most health-related organizations. I have been in the health business a long time and half the people I have worked with are on some medication for depression/anxiety. This has nothing to do with CS as an agency.

    They monitor your computer usage. Well, it's their computer, isn't it? I mean, they gave me a laptop in orientation. It is their property for me to use for work-related business. It's their right to monitor your usage of that computer. They monitor when you enter communication notes? Wouldn't that be your supervisor's responsibility anyway, to ensure that you are doing your job? Monitor your phone? Well, if you are using it for business, what's your problem with it?

    Travel: You are a case manager, it is what you do. You go to your consumer's house to see them. How do you do that without travel?

    Making fun of independent providers? I don't care if you are indie or agency as long as you provide the service you are being paid for. I have not heard anyone making fun of providers, though we do snicker over some of the less than professional email addresses some of them use. hootchiemamma@dot.com is probably not the best email to be using for your business.

    Overworked? Sorry, I don't feel that. Don't feel scatterbrained either.

    I don't want to make CS sound like the cat's meow. Like any company, it has it's issues. But it ain't the evil agency Prittle makes it sound like.
  10. 0
    So, you got your laptop in orientation. This means you haven't been with the company for more than about three years. When you have been there for over five years and have more experience under your belt with this company, you may not be quite as optimistic. Meeting expected deadlines with a decent caseload means working overtime without pay. It will happen. You are human, but they expect perfection in managing your caseload. With the hundreds of things you are responsible for, someday you will make a small mistake or a consumer will complain for no reason. Once, I denied additional hours because they were not medically necessary. The doctor was in agreement. The consumer complained to the state, and I was told to approve the additional hours. I was reprimanded for "supposedly" not returning the consumer's phone calls by the end of the next business day, even though I did. The consumer was believed over me. This is just one incident of many. In the virtual Carestar library, they even have a manual called "The Good Case Manager." It contains the proper steps to take to de-hire undesirable personnel. Look for it. All I can say is that I have worked for Carestar for over five years, and now I am always looking over my shoulder. I would like to find another job, but my skills as a nurse are severely lacking because I have worked for Carestar for so long doing mostly paperwork and administrative duties. I also live in a severely economically depressed region of Ohio. Just wait and see. You'll find out what I mean in time. Carestar takes care of Carestar.

    As for the independent provider who posted, you do not work for Carestar. However, Carestar approves the hours you provide. Without Carestar's approval, you cannot provide services. They are ultimately responsible for monitoring and reprimanding you within their guidelines. In time, you will be subject to a provider review. Best of luck.
    Last edit by Prittle13 on Sep 2, '07
  11. 0
    Three years or five makes little difference. Experiences like this happen quickly, not over time. Sounds to me like you are in an unsupportive environment with your supervisor. This is not agency wide. I have found my supervisor most supportive and understanding.

    As to the State reversing a decision to deny services, that was the State, not CareStar. We all know how the State hates a whiny contituant, right or wrong.

    So all I can say is my experience not like Prittle's experience.


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