C-section vs. letting Mom go naturally - page 2

by JRP1120, RN 7,688 Views | 56 Comments

Why am I hearing more and more of Dr.'s that ASK their patient's if they want to have a c-section instead of waiting and letting nature take it's course and baby comes naturally? I just don't get it! I have a friend that is... Read More


  1. 0
    Yes, but a obstetrician can oversee a lot more vaginal deliveries versus 1 c-section at time. It is pretty simple for an obstetrician to deliver 1 or more vaginal deliveries an hour, but it is difficult at most hospitals for an obstetrician to do more than one routine c-section every couple of hours. Besides the fact that most insurance companies aren't going to pay for elective c-sections.

    The decreased litigation (perceived or real) and the convience of scheduled c- sections IMO is why most obstetricians have increased the amount of elective c-sections.
  2. 0
    Quote from darkangel83
    not to mention a once or twice a day visit from a nurse to do the dressing change for you!
    Generally the dressing is removed after about 24 hours. There is typically no dressing change unless there is a complication like a dehiscence.
  3. 1
    Quote from wtbcrna
    The decreased litigation (perceived or real) and the convience of scheduled c- sections IMO is why most obstetricians have increased the amount of elective c-sections.
    I completely agree. I don't believe that it's out of greed at being able to bill more for a C/S. I believe it's out of fear of litigation.
    tyvin likes this.
  4. 2
    @alohagirljam-the documentary was called "The Business of Being Born." I watched it on Netflix.
    Another thing they mentioned on there was the lack of bonding between baby and mom with C-sections. I don't remember exactly what was said but it just sticks out in my head that the bonding process was interrupted with C-sections. I think it had to do with the lack of pitocin/oxytocin (?) release when you have a CS.
    emmyers and JRP1120, RN like this.
  5. 0
    The decreased litigation (perceived or real) and the convience of scheduled c- sections IMO is why most obstetricians have increased the amount of elective c-sections.
    I agree. I had my second daughter via cesarean because she was undeliverable breach. I then had my youngest VBAC. I liked both vaginal deliveries so much because I was able to get back to normal within a couple of days (cesarean took a few weeks).

    My doc always went vaginal first if he could, but he told me if I got pregnant now, he would have to do a cesarean because of the liability and the OB profession now basically requires it. He said he would have no chance in court if he had complications from a VBAC because professionally it is no longer advised especially in local hospitals. Most local hospitals do not always have the staff for an emergency cesarean. So if you go into normal labor on a night or weekend, and have an emergency, you may have to wait longer than you should.
  6. 0
    Another reason that c-sections are on the rise is the increase in fertility treatments and resulting multiple pregnancies. Most twin and triplet pregnancies are delivered via c-section and these are usually scheduled c-sections. This doesn't relate to the original post about offering c-sections in favor of natural births, but I'm sure these multiples are included in the c-section statistics.
  7. 1
    Locally we are seeing this, it's my understanding that the increase is driven by lawsuits. As one care provider here explained, 'you can't sue for doing a cesarean but you can sue for not doing one'. I don't agree with that, but that's the mentality behind it.
    JRP1120, RN likes this.
  8. 1
    Quote from Ashley, PICU RN
    Another reason that c-sections are on the rise is the increase in fertility treatments and resulting multiple pregnancies. .
    In addition - women are fatter and older now. Sorry to be blunt, but it's true. Obesity increases risk of C/S. As does AMA (which goes back to what you're saying about increased use of fertility treatments).
    melmarie23 likes this.
  9. 3
    I couldn't agree with the OP more if our brains were somehow wired together.

    But as a patient, I can tell you that if the patient doesn't educate themselves and advocate for what they want then doctors and nurses will often push many things off on the patient that are not necessary (not saying any of you do that . I actually got told off several times by a nurse during the labor of my first child (induced) because I didn't want an epidural.

    And I don't think the lawsuit excuse applies when a pregnant woman's due date is several weeks away and the only reason for doing a c/s is a 9 lbs. baby and the cervix is still closed and thick. Many times when the baby is actually born he/she doesn't weigh as much as what was GUESSED while the baby was in the womb.
    ktliz, GooeyRN, and JRP1120, RN like this.
  10. 2
    BTW, the whole c/s push is why I always waited until the last minute possible to go to the hospital when I was in labor (when I wasn't being induced).
    GooeyRN and JRP1120, RN like this.


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