Bottles after 3 hours - page 4

It seems that our lactation nurses and the nursery nurses are at odds with each other. Many of the nursery nurses feel that a baby must eat Q 3- 4 or they will starve. Lactation takes the view (which... Read More

  1. by   mother/babyRN
    kelly girl...."Nipple confusion" is a misnomer invented by a lactation consultant who perhaps feels much the same you do by your above "WTF" post.....I imagine you haven't been a nurse for a couple of decades so can be forgiven.. And, as one psychologist once humorously told me, if an infant is "confused", how the hell do you measure that? Probably the same way they would measure the scale of pain (1-10) a baby has after a circ, simply by asking...) I didn't intent to introduce an idea that you needed to attack, but hey, that is how many of our lactation consultants are and THAT is why many people STOP breast feeding exclusively. No one wants to be railroaded or felt they are forced into one way or another.....Thanks for the "lovely" point, however.....(however wrong or misguided it might be...)
  2. by   mark_LD_RN
    I see we disagree on a couple of points mother baby

    you know i don't buy the line that i am at a disadvantage by not having nursed, i do not believe a person needs to experience something to be able to do it or relate to it. I have the highest success rate and satisfaction ratings on my unit. and after doing much research,helping many patients, and listening to their views. as well as going through it with my wife with all 3 of our children( by the way she had every imaginable breast feeding problem so i got a lot of experience from her) also get a lot of input from her first hand. I feel all this considered I am just as capable as any female to assist wit hbreastfeeding ,and better than a lot of them actually. because i actually care and want whats best for my patient.

    on the topic of nipple confusion i know that is just a term made up by lactation consultants but it fits even if in is not totally accurate.

    I think you have missed the point here, we are not forcing exclusivity here . i especially do not. what we are talking about is the patients wishes and rights. most of my patients come in that want to breast feed with the idea they do not want to supplement. if that is their wish I will make sure it is honored. It is wrong to slip a baby a bottle or pacifer against the parents wishes.

    can you honestly say you have never had a baby that was diffucult to get to breast feed, that giving it a bottle just made it worse?

    when a bottle or supplementation is needed i explain why and ask permission. my patients trust me and usually will do as i suggest.

    the patient that was in tears i was refering to, was in tears because breast feeding was not going well. after baby was given a bottle. you see by slipping the baby a bottle that nurse was not being the patient advocate. that is my whole problem with this policy at dayrays hospital.

    we too have a large asian population and the ones by us will not breastfeed in the hospital they bottle feed in hospital and breast at home supposedly. I have no problem with it. i do my teaching for both bottle and breast. I never force my veiws on anyone. ( forcing ones views on a patient is a sore subject for me as you might be able to tell from my posts.)
    we need to always remember the patient has rights even if we do not agree with them. in the end i want to make sure each persons experience was as good as it could be
  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Originally posted by mark_LD_RN
    I I have the highest success rate and satisfaction ratings on my unit. on the topic of nipple confusion i know that is just a term made up by lactation consultants but it fits even if in is not totally accurate.

    I agree, Mark. To say a man cannot relate to Obstetric nursing or Breastfeeding issues is really equivalent to saying we must personally experience an MI in order to be effective CV ICU nurses! Ridiculous. Just curious, how they track NURSE BF satisfaction/success rates at your institution? I have never been a place this was done. NOT challenging you, just asking cause I have never heard of it done! Thanks!
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Originally posted by KELLYGIRL
    2 WORDS "NIPPLE CONFUSION" - -


    "OK, IF THE BABY DOESN'T BREASTFEED....HMMM....LET'S GIVE IT A BOTTLE......THEN WHEN HE'S DONE....HMMM....PUT A PACIFIER IN HIS MOUTH TO REALLY SCREW HIM UP!!!"

    WTF
    will ya PUUUHLEEZE turn OFF those capitals?????? THANK you.
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Originally posted by vashka25
    (*pardon my inexperience as I'm only a student*)

    Oy what a row this will create when I bring it up in conference on Sat....
    NO such thing as "only a student" cause we are all one another's teachers...and I have LEARNED things from student and grad nurses. I am always open to learn!
  6. by   mark_LD_RN
    we have an follow up survey done it covers a lot ot topics from hospital stay,experience with hospital, staff etc. also questions about baby and feeding. as well as a bunch of other questions. our patients fill out a short one page survey upon discharge as well as one mailed to them couple weeks later and a telephone follow up survey which also allows them to ask questions, by the way it is an RN that makes all the calls and if needed we can refer the patient to appropriatre sources for help
  7. by   maureeno
    I read this entire thread tonight and it made me happy and proud. The thoughtfulness and care shown in these posts will give me sweet dreams.
  8. by   Cheerio
    My 2nd DS was given a bottle in the nursery. He was rushed there after birth, and I was bedridden. However, I had told the NICU nurse and my PP nurse that I wanted to breastfeed, no nurse would take me down to see him They claimed that I should rest and that my BP was still too high to get up and walk around. He was born at 03:40, and I didn't get to see him until 10:30 when my Mom came and wheeled me down. I even asked for a pump, and they dismissed me. When I finally got him, he refused to latch on, even the LC freaked when she heard he was given bottles. I worked at trying to bf him for 2 weeks, and gave up too easily. Our hospital is supposed to be 'breastfeeding friendly'
  9. by   mother/babyRN
    I stand by my opinion and consider to respect all of yours. Period. We will have to agree to disagree, but the day individualism is the component taken out of the art of nursing (patients, that is), is the day all of us should seriously consider retirement. There are NO areas of black and white in any area of medicine, nursing or otherwise, and anyone who thinks there is just hasn't been in the field long enough, or seriously enough. As I said, I respect patients wishes and promote current guidelines with as much vigor as those of you folks who disagree, but I cannot and will NEVER remove individualism from the equasion.....That about speaks for my stance. Thanks to all of you for sharing your opinions and thoughts. It isn't up to me or anyone else to attempt to change someone's point of view. Mine is as educated as anyone elses....It takes courage to stand up for patients, and that is what I intend to continue to do....But, it pleases me that all of you are so devoted to the well fare of these moms and patients. What you fail to see and understand, is so do I....Thanks for the discussion...Anything more heated would just be an argument, would it not? Lets agree to disagree and continue our spectactular care of our patients! {{}}
  10. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Originally posted by Cheerio
    My 2nd DS was given a bottle in the nursery. He was rushed there after birth, and I was bedridden. However, I had told the NICU nurse and my PP nurse that I wanted to breastfeed, no nurse would take me down to see him They claimed that I should rest and that my BP was still too high to get up and walk around. He was born at 03:40, and I didn't get to see him until 10:30 when my Mom came and wheeled me down. I even asked for a pump, and they dismissed me. When I finally got him, he refused to latch on, even the LC freaked when she heard he was given bottles. I worked at trying to bf him for 2 weeks, and gave up too easily. Our hospital is supposed to be 'breastfeeding friendly'
    I am truly sorry to hear this. In a case such as yours, we offer to take the mommie in a wheelchair to the nursery so she may hold/feed the newborn if possible. If the baby is too sick, we certainly encourage her and the family to visit and bond as soon as feasible as well as begin PUMPING milk IMMEDIATELY. Breastfeeding success is important to me and I will do everything humanly possible to help ensure this success for those who are dedicated to it! I am sorry this was not the case for you!
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Originally posted by mother/babyRN
    . It isn't up to me or anyone else to attempt to change someone's point of view. Mine is as educated as anyone elses....It takes courage to stand up for patients, and that is what I intend to continue to do....But, it pleases me that all of you are so devoted to the well fare of these moms and patients. What you fail to see and understand, is so do I....Thanks for the discussion...Anything more heated would just be an argument, would it not? Lets agree to disagree and continue our spectactular care of our patients! {{}}
    I could not agree more w/this part of your post. I agree to respect all points of view here, even if we don't agree on principle.
  12. by   SmilingBluEyes
    sorry duplicate post..
  13. by   mother/babyRN
    I have to say that whatever anyone says, no man has any idea exactly how tired, sore or anything else a breast feeding person gets. And, as both men and women can get MIs, I think that example is totally off base...I am not simply talking about the physical component. Sitting next to me while I am breast feeding every two hours does not a similar experience to my husband make. But, I wouldn't make that even an iota of an argument since, once said, it really doesn't make for much more than voilitile discussion between men and women.
    Hey, I check out the nutrative suck, audible swallow and work out there in the trenches just like all of you to achieve a great breast feeding experience...Truly, I do. But, babies, though rarely, do get dehydrated and have low blood sugars. Their health comes first. I am happy that doesn't happen too often.. And why doesn't anyone ( although there are a few studies out) consider that babies can get thirsty? I recall when I was in nursing school, the general belief was that newborns didn't experience pain, so weren't medicated after surgical procedures, in my case, repair of mylomeningoceles.) I am not arguing with any ones points here. I am just saying, as I have mentioned, there is no such thing as black and white in the area of nursing (either definition), and sometimes you have to work with the grey.....

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