Bad Delivery - page 2

HI, HAD A DELIVERY SEVERAL NIGHTS AGO THAT COULD HAVE BEEN A LOT WORSE THAN IT WAS FOR BOTH MOTHER AND BABY..... NOT THAT I AM OPPOSED TO THE BRADLEY METHOD BUT THIS COUPLE WAS A LITTLE ON THE... Read More

  1. by   Mommy2Katiebaby
    Funny you say the more rigid the birth plan, the more likely it is something will go wrong - my DD was born by emergency c-section at 26 weeks - the day before what WOULD have been my first Bradley class...
  2. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I think Bradley teaching is WONDERFUL. I also think flexibility ought to be a key in any labor/delivery. That flexibility would serve both birthing family AND nursing/medical staff well. There IS a medium, if we are willing to meet each other there. Birth plans are respected where I work. Fortunately, the doctors review these with the patients and will NOT promise what they cannot deliver. Patients know this prior to delivering where I work.There is ONE doctor we are "working on" as far as promising or refusing to discuss birth plans prior to delivery. There ARE some things that risk management and our policies will NOT allow (like no monitoring in VBAC cases). Having discussed each aspect of the plan PRIOR to arrival at the hospital in labor sure helps a lot. I know of no nurses where I work who sit and laugh or put down birth plans or Bradley couples. I do know we appreciate a little flexibility, however. I think we all do. Nothing "wacko" at all about wishing to have control over one's birth experience, in my opinion. Everyone should have that right.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Feb 15, '05
  3. by   hospitalstaph
    I took Bradley and used it with my last two. The instructor that I had was not at all "anti-medical". It was about making informed choices. I had wonderful births with the last two. The hospital staff was great and followed everything that I requested.

    What I have heard from some parents that were not happy with their hospital experience is that they were never told why something was being done. I can certainly say that was true for myself with my first child. They performed so many procedures on me and never once told me why. Maybe they were absolutely necessary but how do I know if they don't explain it to me?

    Having said that, I have met some of those "over the top" anti-medical people before and I really would not want to attend their deliveries Birth is not always a medical event, but sometimes it is.

    Tracy
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    The people who are staunchly anti-medical do exist. I have cared for them. Some, I could gain trust, others not even close. I feel this is one reason why a person should be able to choose her venue. Home, midwife-run birth center, or hospital. It should always be up to her, after she is aware of benefits and risks of each. Sadly such choices are discouraged and even disallowed by law some places. I think that needs to change. It should be up to the family where they choose to deliver. Just as long as they are aware of what they taking on, that is.
  5. by   hospitalstaph
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    The people who are staunchly anti-medical do exist. I have cared for them. Some, I could gain trust, others not even close. I feel this is one reason why a person should be able to choose her venue. Home, midwife-run birth center, or hospital. It should always be up to her, after she is aware of benefits and risks of each. Sadly such choices are discouraged and even disallowed by law some places. I think that needs to change. It should be up to the family where they choose to deliver. Just as long as they are aware of what they taking on, that is.
    Oh I absolutely think that people should be able to choose how they give birth. I had to drive to another state (OK only 45 min away) to use a midwife. My requests were very minimal but the drs that I talked to said no way. Sad too because I am really easy to get along with and I think that they may have loosened their restrictions if they had attended my birth.

    Tracy
  6. by   belzmom
    I really agree you were put in a bad spot, and the worst part was not being a team with the physician - instead, you try to do your job and are left hanging by him when the family objects. My grandson was born in October, and there was a much better middle ground. Three of us family members were in the room with my daughter (by plan) - her husband, his mother, her mother. One nurse only, the delivery nurse, and doctor, during pushing. Delivery nurse came in after delivery and did assessment a few minutes later, with me standing near holding my grandson's hand (not intefering, just being present with him). Then after a few minutes of the usual, and a few stitches to my daughter (not much tearing), mostly family members with nurses in and out checking in. It felt like we were all a team with the same goals, and we appreciated the flexibility with family members (what my daughter wanted). I would think a sit-down if posssible with the physician and supportive facilitator would be best, because ultimately it is no good to broker these issues at the birth time, and when one team member undermines another the mother and baby always lose.
  7. by   fergus51
    Rigidity in birth is never a good thing in my opinion. Mom isn't in control of the process. Dad isn't. The doc isn't. The nurse isn't. We ALL have to roll with the punches. I love families who want as little intervention as possible, but I hate working with families who see us as the enemy and don't want any intervention even when it's medically necessary. I had one woman who wanted a natural birth when baby's heart rate dipped down and stayed there. It took the doc asking her if she wanted a vag birth of a dead baby or a c-section of a live child for her to wake up and clue in. Thank God they are not the majority!!!
  8. by   Q.
    Quote from fergus51
    Rigidity in birth is never a good thing in my opinion. Mom isn't in control of the process. Dad isn't. The doc isn't. The nurse isn't. We ALL have to roll with the punches. I love families who want as little intervention as possible, but I hate working with families who see us as the enemy and don't want any intervention even when it's medically necessary.
    Completely agree.
    Working with HB transfers or any other birth plan is my opinion is no different than working with med/surg patients from different cultures who have similiar requests. The key to a good experience is compromise by both parties.

    Bradley couples do scare me, though; in my experience they've already labeled me as the enemy before they even met me.
  9. by   BETSRN
    Quote from fergus51
    Rigidity in birth is never a good thing in my opinion. Mom isn't in control of the process. Dad isn't......... It took the doc asking her if she wanted a vag birth of a dead baby or a c-section of a live child for her to wake up and clue in. Thank God they are not the majority!!!
    Isn't it awful when you have to get to that point with someone? It just seems that sometimes, what you see is the mind stopping the labor process. I am convinced that's what we see with some of these more staunch anti-medical people. Little ever seems to go right for them. I think the mind is a very powerful thing!
  10. by   belzmom
    Quote from BETSRN
    Isn't it awful when you have to get to that point with someone? It just seems that sometimes, what you see is the mind stopping the labor process. I am convinced that's what we see with some of these more staunch anti-medical people. Little ever seems to go right for them. I think the mind is a very powerful thing!
    I think that is a great point. I think it would be a good thing if nurses in general did more public education on how we approach health and well-being with patients. Sometimes we get lumped in with allopathic practitioners whose model reduces people to symptoms to be treated. Now I don't think all doctors practice interpersonally that way, but educating people about nursing philosophy might help some of them partner better with us.
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from belzmom
    I think that is a great point. I think it would be a good thing if nurses in general did more public education on how we approach health and well-being with patients. Sometimes we get lumped in with allopathic practitioners whose model reduces people to symptoms to be treated. Now I don't think all doctors practice interpersonally that way, but educating people about nursing philosophy might help some of them partner better with us.
    That would require an interest on their parts to know. And it would mean the media would need to stop stereotyping us. GOOD LUCK on BOTH accounts.
  12. by   FutureNrse
    Quote from BETSRN
    Your story is horrible, and the treatment you received inexcusable. Although it matters not, there are many hospitals that would treat you (as a homebirth transfer) with kindness and respect (the way everyone is treated). We get HB transfers on occasion (because we are one of the few hospitals that has a positive relationship with some of the HB midwives in the area). The practice who will accept them asks that these candidates have at least ONE office visit with them to make sure all is a good fit. It is usually a positive experience and benefits everyone:most important the pregnant couple.

    Those who choose HB have to realize, however, that not all HB transfers are easy to work with. Many are scared to death and as confrontational as anything, making it extremely difficult to please these people at all. Often when transfer has been necessary, more interventions are necessary (though not always) and it is difficult at best, when one of these couples comes in demanding that NOTHING be done.

    That, on top of the fact that many HB transfers that facilities see are "train wrecks" or the result of an incompetent midwife doesn't help the HB cause at all.

    Granted, it is unacceptable that HB transfers are treated poorly by staff. In all fairness, however, it must be stated that often hospital personnel are treated poorly by HB patinets for a myriad of reasons. Thus, the attitude that prevails many places. Don't forget that hospital people never get to see all those HB's that go right!

    It is inexcusable that you were treated poorly. No matter how long it has been, I think a letter to the nurse manager of the unit where you had to deliver, as well as a letter to the hospital president is in order. Health care professionals need to be aware and accountable for their behaviors.
    Thank you so much for your kind words. We were made to feel like a home birth was wrong, and even told that the reason most choose a home birth is because the mother drinks or uses drugs and doesn't want the hospital to find out. I've always wondered if one of the staff switched my urine sample intentionally, and that really hurts me.
    I did go to every prenatal appointment, and was in great health or I would'nt have considered a home birth. I do have to admit, that after being treated so badly upon arrival, we did decide to do one thing that the staff wasn't happy about. During one alone minute we had, we decided that once our son was on his way out, Daddy would step-in and catch him. Other than that, we treated the staff well, even though they certainly didn't treat us the same. They were quite peeved when just as my son was making his appearance, Daddy quickly stepped in front of the doc and caught him then laid him on my stomach.
    I think you're right about writing to the hospital, I'd hate to think of anyone else going through what we went through. We were mature enough and experienced enough to handle the situation, but maybe others aren't. So many young women have babies, and I imagine they'd be quite intimidated by the situation we were in. I'm going to take your advice and make sure that the hospital knows just how painful and unfair our experience was. Thank you.
  13. by   CEG
    I attended Bradley classes when I was pregnant with my daughter. I ended up with an induction at 42 weeks, pain meds, etc. But the classes are really about being informed. There is even a session on C-section (and how it is sometimes necessary). I've read on this site about doctors who always use vacuums, cut epis, perform elective c-section, etc, and attending Bradley classes would be one way to ensure you understand those things. I think a few bad teachers/ students give it a bad name. Dr Bradley was an obstetrician so he couldn't have hated them too much

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