What causes hyperthermia, nausea and vomiting in fluid volume deficit patient?

  1. 0 What causes a person with fluid volume deficit to have hyperthermia?

    What causes a person with fluid volume deficit to have nausea and vomiting?
  2. Visit  swansonplace profile page

    About swansonplace

    Joined Jun '10; Posts: 801; Likes: 149.

    16 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    1
    We are happy to help with home work.....but we need to see what you think first. Our goal is to help you be the best nurse you can be...and that is letting you show us what you think first ....then we will be happy to jump right in and lead you to the answer.
    Kidrn911 likes this.
  4. Visit  swansonplace profile page
    0
    Quote from Esme12
    We are happy to help with home work.....but we need to see what you think first. Our goal is to help you be the best nurse you can be...and that is letting you show us what you think first ....then we will be happy to jump right in and lead you to the answer.
    I unfortunately have no idea what causes these things.

    This is not my homework, I am just trying to understand for nclex.
    Last edit by swansonplace on Jul 25, '13 : Reason: .
  5. Visit  Laurie52 profile page
    0
    Quote from swansonplace
    What causes a person with fluid volume deficit to have hyperthermia?

    What causes a person with fluid volume deficit to have nausea and vomiting?
    Frequently it is related to hypernatremia
  6. Visit  chare profile page
    1
    Are you sure that the fluid volume deficit is causing either the hyperthermia or nausea an vomiting?
    KelRN215 likes this.
  7. Visit  KelRN215 profile page
    0
    Quote from chare
    Are you sure that the fluid volume deficit is causing either the hyperthermia or nausea an vomiting?
    I'm gonna have to agree with this. Why do you think that the fluid deficit is causing the nausea/vomiting and not vice versa?
  8. Visit  swansonplace profile page
    0
    Just reviewing, and it said that for fluid volume deficit that the nurse is to check for hyperthermia.

    I was to check for vital signs which included hyperthermia, tachycardia, thread pulse, hypotension, orthostatic hypotension, etc. I understand how the tachycardia, thread pulse, hypotension, and orthostatic hypotension are related to hypovolemia, but not hyperthermia.

    Someone mentioned hyponatremia could be related to hyperthermia. I don't quite get the connection as to how hyponatremia could cause or be related to hyperthermia.
  9. Visit  RLtinker profile page
    0
    I don't know, my med surge book seems to be contradicting its self. At one point it lists increased temperature as a clinical manifestation, but then a few paragraphs later it says there is usually a decrease in body temperature unless the body is fighting an infection. Another book lists it as a cause, but not a sign.
  10. Visit  Laurie52 profile page
    0
    Quote from swansonplace
    Just reviewing, and it said that for fluid volume deficit that the nurse is to check for hyperthermia.

    I was to check for vital signs which included hyperthermia, tachycardia, thread pulse, hypotension, orthostatic hypotension, etc. I understand how the tachycardia, thread pulse, hypotension, and orthostatic hypotension are related to hypovolemia, but not hyperthermia.

    Someone mentioned hyponatremia could be related to hyperthermia. I don't quite get the connection as to how hyponatremia could cause or be related to hyperthermia.
    Hypernatremia, not hyponatremia. Hypernatremia can interfere with the thermoregulation of the body by limiting its ability to sweat.
  11. Visit  I.C.UNurse profile page
    1
    I think what this is trying to point you to is a documented infection. Infection's usually lead to some fluid volume deficit from vomiting or diarrhea. So, with this infection, there is inflammation in the body leading to an increase in body temperature (hyperthermia) and fluid volume deficit for the above reasons. And for the second point, usually fluid volume deficit can lead to feelings of nausea and sickness, but for majority of the time, vomiting is the reason for the fluid volume deficit, not the other way around. Infection could also have side effects of nausea and vomiting, which could lead to fluid volume deficit and hyperthermia. It's hard to say with out more information and physiological findings to go on. In the end it sounds like both are pointing towards some kind of infection for the reason of both the side effects.
    Kidrn911 likes this.
  12. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    1
    Quote from swansonplace
    What causes a person with fluid volume deficit to have hyperthermia?

    What causes a person with fluid volume deficit to have nausea and vomiting?
    Fluid deficit does not directly cause hyperthermia....however hyperthermia can cause a fluid deficit and is a common finding in a patient with dehydration/fluid deficit. To correct fluid deficits, giving fluids is not enough...... you need to also treat the underlying cause....in order to treat the volume deficit.

    Physiological Dehydration Signs and Symptoms
    • Recent rapid weight loss
    • Dry eyes and/or mouth
    • Change in mental status
    • Fever
    • Vomiting
    • Postural hypotension
    • Small amount of concentrated urine
    • Urinary tract infections
    • Pulse >100 beats/minute and/or systolic blood pressure <100 mmHg
    • Dizziness
    Determination of the cause of dehydration is essential. Poor fluid intake, excessive fluid output, increased insensible fluid losses, or a combination of the above may cause intravascular volume depletion. Successful treatment requires identification of the underlying disease state.

    Conditions and Factors That May Increase Risk for Dehydration or Fluid/Electrolyte Imbalance
    Clinical Conditions


    • Dementia or cognitive impairment
    • Fever (including low-grade fever)
    • Diarrhea
    • Vomiting
    • Dependence on staff for eating and drinking
    • Use of medications that can cause dehydration (e.g., diuretics, phenytoin, lithium, laxatives)
    • Draining wounds or pressure ulcers
    • Excessive sweating
    • Rapid breathing
    • Gastrointestinal bleeding
    • Previous episodes of dehydration
    • Difficult or painful swallowing
    • Depression
    • Small amount of dark or concentrated urine
    • Excessive urination
    • Nothing-by-mouth or fluid-restriction orders
    • Chronic comorbidities (e.g. stroke, diabetes, congestive heart failure)
    • Infection
    • Dizziness
    Dehydration Clinical Presentation this link leads to medscape my favorite resource/source of information.....you have to register....but it is FREE!

    • Common causes
      • Gastroenteritis: This is the most common cause of dehydration. If both vomiting and diarrhea are present, dehydration may rapidly progress.[7, 8]
      • Stomatitis: Pain may severely limit oral intake.
      • Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA): Dehydration is caused by osmotic diuresis. Weight loss is caused by both excessive fluid losses and tissue catabolism. Rapid rehydration, especially rapid initial volume resuscitation, may be associated with a poor neurologic outcome. DKA requires very specific and controlled treatment (see Diabetic Ketoacidosis).
      • Febrile illness: Fever causes increased insensible fluid losses and may affect appetite.
      • Pharyngitis: This may decrease oral intake.

    • Life-threatening causes
      • Gastroenteritis
      • DKA
      • Burns: Fluid losses may be extreme. Very aggressive fluid management is required (see Burns, Thermal).
      • Congenital adrenal hyperplasia: This may have associated hypoglycemia, hypotension, hyperkalemia, and hyponatremia.
      • GI obstruction: This is often associated with poor intake and emesis. Bowel ischemia can result in extensive capillary leak and shock.
      • Heat stroke: Hyperpyrexia, dry skin, and mental status changes may occur.[9]
      • Cystic fibrosis: This results in excessive sodium and chloride losses in sweat, placing patients at risk for severe hyponatremic hypochloremic dehydration.
      • Diabetes insipidus: Excessive output of very dilute urine can result in large free water losses and severe hypernatremic dehydration.
      • http://emedicine.medscape.com/articl...clinical#a0217

    What NCLEX review question/s made you not understand fluid volume deficit with hyperthermia and nausea and vomiting......I need a place to start
    Last edit by Esme12 on Jul 26, '13
    teacher08 likes this.
  13. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    0
    Quote from swansonplace
    Just reviewing, and it said that for fluid volume deficit that the nurse is to check for hyperthermia.

    I was to check for vital signs which included hyperthermia, tachycardia, thread pulse, hypotension, orthostatic hypotension, etc. I understand how the tachycardia, thread pulse, hypotension, and orthostatic hypotension are related to hypovolemia, but not hyperthermia.

    Someone mentioned hyponatremia could be related to hyperthermia. I don't quite get the connection as to how hyponatremia could cause or be related to hyperthermia.
    No...they said hypernatremia. With the loss of fluids the blood becomes concentrated so hypernatremia is a common finding in a person with clinical dehydration.....a part of your differential diagnosis.

    Hyperthermia is a common finding in dehydration and needs to be addressed as a part of the differential diagnosis. Hyperthermia causes a further fluid loss which worsens the dehydration.

    As you have finished nursing school....think back to you fluid and electrolyte lectures and what are the underlying causes of dehydration/fluid deficit.

    NCLEX want to KNOW that if a patient is presenting with a specific set of symptoms...you as the nurse will know what to do and what to look for so you know how to prioritize and treat this patient effectively.

    Don't over think.....looki at what the question is asking......if the patient is dehydrated and they are hot....what do you need to do to help them.
  14. Visit  RLtinker profile page
    0
    It depends on if the fluid loss is hypertonic, isotonic, or hypotonic.Some books make a distinction between FVD and dehydration and some do not. With dehydration you do have hypernatrimia, with FVD fluids and electrolytes can be lost in the same proportions, but you may have an electrolyte imbalance depending on the cause. But either way, you treat the cause and replace with the fluids dependent on the type of fluid loss. Could the hypernatremia cause increased in body temperature? Yes, but I think it has more to do with the cause of the hypovolemia, then being caused by it.


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