Should I or should I not?

  1. I am currently in school to become a LPN, I know that the country is becoming more diverse. So my question is Should I take a spanish class, or should I not take it. I am really torn rather to take it or not. My son speaks Spanish fluently, because he learned it in high school. He drives me crazy talking in Spanish, I guess because I dont know what he is saying.
    Do you think it is beneficial to take it? Will it increase my chances of getting a better job? I really need advise on this. Thank you in advance for any advice you want to share.
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   EricJRN
    I speak pretty good Spanish and I encourage other people to acquire the skills, but here's something to consider. While you'll learn some basics in a beginning Spanish class, you're unlikely to become very proficient from one or two semesters alone.
  4. by   Daytonite
    I think diversity is great. However, I don't support anything that continues to keep our cultures separated. This is America and people came to America for a better life. That should include learning to speak the language spoken here. I think most immigrants understand that. My grandparents did. So, do the parents of the kids that live next door to me who are asian. America shares enough of itself with the world. Learn whatever Spanish you feel might help you converse with patients who don't know English. Other than that, I don't see it increasing your chances of employment. I'm living in an area of country surrounded by a huge Spanish speaking population as well a number of asian speaking ones. The only professions where being bilingual is a requirement is those businesses who cultivate the patronage of that population. Nurses are already in short supply. If being bilingual becomes a requirement for some nursing positions, then employers should have to pay for the skill.
  5. by   rags
    I have only been working in the nursing profession since last June but have several times wished I had stuck with spanish when I was still in middle school. I personally have had a few patients that spoke only spanish. I work on a PED's unit and the pt (child) had to be my interpreter. It is not something that will give you an edge on a job but it will definitely be something that can benefit you in your career. PT care is much easier if you can be your own interpreter.

    rags
  6. by   Bella Donna
    I mainly want to learn just enough to be able to care for the patient efficiently, and know that a misunderstanding (such as a language barrier) should cause a mistake that I cant afford to make. I also feel that anyone who comes here should learn to speak our language, However, I feel that it could also be the difference of life and death if I cannot understand what they want to tell me. Am I wrong for this? I am having a really tough time with this situation.
  7. by   valifay
    If its a common language where you will be working it wouldn't hurt to take it. That way you would also know what your son is saying under his breath when he's mad at you LOL!
  8. by   SuesquatchRN
    Absolutely. Aside from helping you in your work, it's lovely to be able to speak more than one language.

    Sure, people should learn English, but that won't help them in an emergency, unless we want to puinish them for not having done so. And I certainly don't.
  9. by   Bella Donna
    I agree with both of you Valifay, and Suesquatch. You are both right. I think I have made my decision, I am gonna take it. I am from the deep south though, and my son says he can just hear my country a** trying to speak spanish.
  10. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from Bella Donna
    I agree with both of you Valifay, and Suesquatch. You are both right. I think I have made my decision, I am gonna take it. I am from the deep south though, and my son says he can just hear my country a** trying to speak spanish.
    ?Que pasa, y'all?


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