Great at care plans, suck at concept maps.

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    Just looking for any pieces of advice to make concept maps click for me. I've gotten decent grades (only missing a point or two here and there) on the care plans I've turned in, which are just written out in ADPIE format, but for the life of me can't figure out the best way to do a concept map. Maybe I don't think visually so much as verbally...but anyway.

    Does the concept map basically include the same info as a care plan, just presented in a diagram type way? So I'd put the nursing diagnosis in the middle with different goals and interventions branching out? Or would I put the patient's main reason for needing care in the middle and go from there? It's annoying me that I'm getting so stuck on something that seems like it should be simple.
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  3. 10 Comments so far...

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    I'm new to this as well, but have gotten good marks on my concept maps. We put the main diagnosis or reason for visit in the center, then nursing diagnosis in branching boxes. Off the nursing diagnosis comes interventions and then goals off that.
    SentimentalGeek likes this.
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    That's helpful, thank you!
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    IMHO concept maps seem very unprofessional. And correct me if I am wrong, will never be used in the real world. Its a mess of boxes and circles.. it felt so unorganized. The only benefit of a concept map to me is that it can have more than one diagnosis versus having separate care plans for each diagnosis. As a nurse I would NOT want to look at a concept map that another nurse wrote. Its a waste of time deciphering it.
    SentimentalGeek likes this.
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    Whether or not it's "mess of boxes & circles" depends on how your instructor requires you to do the concept map. The ones required by my instructors are not as crazy looking as some that I've seen. Ours have the reason for visit/care in the center, then nursing diagnosis in surrounding boxes. As part of the nursing diagnosis box, we have to include all that stuff that other instructors have you put in even more boxes/circles within the SAME diagnosis box (and in a particular order). The concept maps as we're required to do them, don't seem at all like the visual "big picture" aid that they were intended (and often fail) to be for other students/programs.
    SentimentalGeek likes this.
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    I've seen some crazy looking care maps....yes they have the same information. I don't like them because they appear disorganized to my OCD anal retentive brain.

    http://faculty.ucc.edu/nursing-villa...ap example.pdf

    You may find this resource helpful. Concept Mapping
    SentimentalGeek likes this.
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    Quote from elementguy13
    IMHO concept maps seem very unprofessional. And correct me if I am wrong, will never be used in the real world. Its a mess of boxes and circles.. it felt so unorganized. The only benefit of a concept map to me is that it can have more than one diagnosis versus having separate care plans for each diagnosis. As a nurse I would NOT want to look at a concept map that another nurse wrote. Its a waste of time deciphering it.
    This is exactly how I feel. My brain doesn't work this way (OCD and anal-retentive very much describes my brain too!) and I'd never do this in real life - it seems like such a mess and I'm spending so much time trying to figure out how to do it that I could have easily just written 5 care plans by now. I'd never want anyone to base care on a concept map I have done or vice versa, it seems like there is way too much potential for misunderstanding or misreading when there are dozens of arrows pointing in every direction. And it seems like my instructor feels "the messier the better". I suppose if certain people's minds work that way then it's probably helpful for them, but it's just not for me. *Gives concept maps the evil eye*

    Thank you so much for the link Esme12, that looks like it will help a lot.
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    They are very helpful for some brains. I had my kid (IQ >140, brilliant at science and math, could explain anything to anyone, but couldn't write a comprehensive paragraph to save his soul) eval'd by a learning specialist, and she taught him how to do concept mapping and said MIT is full of kids like him. Now he's a nuclear engineer. Really.
    SentimentalGeek and llg like this.
  11. 3
    The concept maps that you do as a student are not meant to be used at the bedside -- just like the 15 page care plans that my generation had to do in school have never been considered practical for bedside use. Those types of concept maps (and/or care plans) are used to help students improve their thinking processes -- not to help experienced nurses give care on a daily basis. Concept maps help students to see (literally "see") how different pieces of the puzzle fit together when everything is not linear. Traditional care plans force everything into a linear format that doesn't always reflect reality and may involve a lot of duplication as details overlap and involve multiple relationships. Care maps seem "messier" because they better reflect real-world conditions -- that are rarely need and tidy.

    Concept maps can be very useful in the real world when you are designing and/or evaluating programs -- mapping out how multiple services will be delivered to patients, how multiple topics will be delivered within an educational program, etc. Nurses responsible for such things "sketch out" their ideas all the time.
    kylee_adns, SentimentalGeek, and GrnTea like this.
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    Thanks for those comments explaining them a bit more in depth. Your descriptions and reasoning make sense to me and just might be what I have needed to hear all along to make it click. We haven't had them explained that way (or any way, really). I find it difficult to do things just for the sake of doing them, especially if I don't feel like I'm actually gaining anything from it.

    The story about your son is interesting, GrnTea. Not trying to toot my own horn, but I have always scored highly on standardized exams and spent most of my pre-college years in "gifted" programs at school. I scored in the 99th percentile on my ATI critical thinking test. Not being able to make this make sense to me has been driving me bonkers. Funny how different little things can still trip people up.


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