Femoral fx - page 2

by Rosiemenard

1,364 Visits | 11 Comments

Hi student nurses and nurses. Wednesday was my second week stage this week and my patient had a femoral fracture and it was her third day post op. She complains of nausea so i gave her gravol. She also reports pain 6/10 on her... Read More


  1. 0
    I stand corrected in one way-- there is, in fact, a "Deficient knowledge" NANDA-I diagnosis.

    However, it is in Domain 5, perception/cognition, Class 4, Cognition, and its definition is, "Absence or deficiency of cognitive information related to a specific topic."

    Defining characteristics (this means, these are the symptoms I assessed):
    Exaggerated behaviors
    Inaccurate follow-through of instruction
    Inaccurate performance of test
    Inappropriate behaviors (e.g., hysterical, hostile, agitated, apathetic)
    Reports the problem

    Related factors (this means, this is the cause of the symptoms):
    Cognitive limitation
    Information misinterpretation
    Lack of exposure
    Lack of interest in learning
    Lack of recall
    Unfamiliar with information resources

    I am not seeing information in the OP's patient assessment that tells me this woman has a cognitive problem. Maybe she does, but you'd have to look for the related factor that says so, and describe the defining characteristics that support your assessment and diagnosis. As a reminder, just because a patient doesn't seem to you to know what you think she should doesn't necessarily mean she meets this diagnosis, given these definition/defining characteristics/ related factors specific to this diagnosis.

    Not getting out of bed isn't necessarily evidence that she doesn't know why she should, so it's not reasonable to give that as evidence of a cognitive deficiency. As others have pointed out, there could be a lt of other reasons. You will find many, many patients in your career who know perfectly well what they should know, but chose not to use it or act upon it. (can I hear an AMEN from other old grads?)
  2. 2
    Quote from GrnTea
    I stand corrected in one way-- there is, in fact, a "Deficient knowledge" NANDA-I diagnosis.

    However, it is in Domain 5, perception/cognition, Class 4, Cognition, and its definition is, "Absence or deficiency of cognitive information related to a specific topic."

    Defining characteristics (this means, these are the symptoms I assessed):
    Exaggerated behaviors
    Inaccurate follow-through of instruction
    Inaccurate performance of test
    Inappropriate behaviors (e.g., hysterical, hostile, agitated, apathetic)
    Reports the problem

    Related factors (this means, this is the cause of the symptoms):
    Cognitive limitation
    Information misinterpretation
    Lack of exposure
    Lack of interest in learning
    Lack of recall
    Unfamiliar with information resources

    I am not seeing information in the OP's patient assessment that tells me this woman has a cognitive problem. Maybe she does, but you'd have to look for the related factor that says so, and describe the defining characteristics that support your assessment and diagnosis. As a reminder, just because a patient doesn't seem to you to know what you think she should doesn't necessarily mean she meets this diagnosis, given these definition/defining characteristics/ related factors specific to this diagnosis.

    Not getting out of bed isn't necessarily evidence that she doesn't know why she should, so it's not reasonable to give that as evidence of a cognitive deficiency. As others have pointed out, there could be a lt of other reasons. You will find many, many patients in your career who know perfectly well what they should know, but chose not to use it or act upon it. (can I hear an AMEN from other old grads?)
    I don't know I think it does.....
    she asked me why it was so important to mobilize and do physical exercise
    tells me that this patient has a lack of recall (if they received pre-op teaching or any post op teaching) an inaccurate follow through of instruction...won't get OOB, just by what the OP told us.

    She may not have had instruction...so she has a lack of exposure, unfamiliar with information resources given to her or lack of recall of what she has been taught.

    Cognitive deficiency doesn't necessarily mean it is an it is an absence or deficiency cognitive INFORMATION not necessarily of a pathological nature.
    CT Pixie and ixchel like this.


Top