excelsior accepted in ?? states - page 2

hi all just wonderin if anyone knew which states do or don't accept excelsior college? I think calif doesn't and colorodo is about to not accept them after the first of the year but other than that I... Read More

  1. by   Sheri257
    Quote from traumahawk99
    many of the states that don't accept it or accept it only if you're an lpn will give you reciprocity from another state. so there's a back door. it's a way they can give lip service to the control freaks who run the traditional nursing schools, and are hopping up and down about "some internet program" competing with them.

    i wouldn't sweat it dude. full speed ahead! you'll be glad you did it .

    I know many absolute idiots who have graduated from traditional nursing programs, which did nothing for them.
    I can't believe you're saying this. You can get in through the back door? You're actually suggesting that people ignore board criteria and base their decisions on this? BTW ... EC asked for reciprocity in California. The board denied it. I seriously doubt you can "backdoor" anything in other states as well.

    EC: the school of "back door" licensees. And you think traditional grads are idiots? When EC students claim they can get licensed through "back doors" ... they're only reinforcing people's worst assumptions about the program.

    Unbelievable.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 12, '05
  2. by   MedictoRN
    Have you ever considered a politics as a career? You have a keen ability to take what someone says and use just enough words from them and turn it around into something completely different.

    This "backdoor" is the SAME door that every other nurse from a different state would have to use to get licensed. It's call reciprosity. And it works just fine for 48 out of 50 states. I will be an EC grad in a few months and I am absolutely confident that I will work in any state I want to.

    No worries!!

    Good luck to you!
  3. by   pedinurse05
    Quote from MedictoRN
    Have you ever considered a politics as a career? You have a keen ability to take what someone says and use just enough words from them and turn it around into something completely different.

    This "backdoor" is the SAME door that every other nurse from a different state would have to use to get licensed. It's call reciprosity. And it works just fine for 48 out of 50 states. I will be an EC grad in a few months and I am absolutely confident that I will work in any state I want to.

    No worries!!

    Good luck to you!
    You can work in almost any state. I think California is the only one you absolutely can't unless you enrolled before the big cut date. Other states have restrictions, but don't necessarily not allow the EC graduate to not work there.
    "Back dooring it" and "finishing fast", are not exactly positive remarks about EC....
    I say to each your own....we are all different individuals and what works for one may not work for another.
  4. by   Sheri257
    Quote from MedictoRN
    This "backdoor" is the SAME door that every other nurse from a different state would have to use to get licensed. It's call reciprosity. And it works just fine for 48 out of 50 states. I will be an EC grad in a few months and I am absolutely confident that I will work in any state I want to.
    So if you're a paramedic, and Louisiana, Florida, Rhode Island and Washington states require you to be an LPN, you still think you're going to get a license through reciprocity? Not to mention, the Alabama BON has a decision posted on their website denying an EC paramedic licensure.

    What evidence is there that these five states are going to throw out their criteria and give you a license? They don't license non-LPN's in their own state, but they're going to license non-LPN's from out-of-state? That makes a lot of sense.

    I don't see how misinformation or speculation is going to help people like Firemedic, who are trying to make serious decisions about this issue. If people can't get licensed in certain states, they need to know that.

    If you actually have evidence to back up these claims, you should post it. Otherwise, it's totally misleading.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 12, '05
  5. by   pedinurse05
    Quote from lizz
    So if you're a paramedic, and Louisiana, Florida, Rhode Island and Washington states require you to be an LPN, you still think you're going to get a license through reciprocity? Not to mention, the Alabama BON has a decision posted on their website denying an EC paramedic licensure.

    What evidence is there that these five states are going to throw out their criteria and give you a license? They don't license non-LPN's in their own state, but they're going license non-LPN's from out-of-state? That makes a lot of sense.

    I don't see how misinformation or speculation is going to help people like Firemedic, who are trying to make serious decisions about this issue. If people can't get licensed in certain states, they need to know that.

    If you actually have evidence to back up these claims, you should post it. Otherwise, it's totally misleading.

    I think LIZZ may be right on the paramedic or other non-LPN EC graduates...you may not be able to endorse into those states. The only way to be sure if a state will accept your EC credentials for endorsement is to call their BON. On the CO BON site non-LPNs can still endorse but have extra clinical hours to complete. Alabama does have a denial of an EC paramedic grad on their site. You should not assume you can work anywhere...unless you have contacted the BON for the state that you seek licensure in. I took my NCLEX in the state of FLorida and they were clear that you must be an LPN if you graduated from EC.
    Missy
  6. by   Sheri257
    Quote from pedinurse05
    You should not assume you can work anywhere...unless you have contacted the BON for the state that you seek licensure in.
    This is very true. Quite frankly, I don't know if anyone knows for sure what's going on with all of the state boards. Look at the Alabama case. Despite numerous threads about EC and the BON's, nobody knew about that case until recently ... but the case is over three and a half years old. And it's still not clear what exactly Alabama's criteria is. It's also taken forever to get clarification on what was happening in Colorado.

    If you don't know where you might move in the future, it's probably going to very tough to get a clear picture of what's happening with all of the state boards because, unfortunately, not all of them are making this info readily available.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 13, '05
  7. by   RN34TX
    Quote from lizz
    This is very true. Quite frankly, I don't know if anyone knows for sure what's going on with all of the state boards. Look at the Alabama case. Despite numerous threads about EC and the BON's, nobody knew about that case until recently ... but the case is over three and a half years old. And it's still not clear what exactly Alabama's criteria is. It's also taken forever to get clarification on what was happening in Colorado.

    If you don't know where you might move in the future, it's probably going to very tough to get a clear picture of what's happening with all of the state boards because, unfortunately, not all of them are making this info readily available.

    Perhaps never discussed on this particular BB until I brought it up a few weeks or so back, the AL case was well discussed in the EC circles when I was an EC student myself, so I can't take credit for discovering it because it spread like wildfire on EC's own student discussion boards as well as a CPNE website several years ago and that's where I learned about it.
    It really was the first documented case of denial of licensure in a state that wasn't normally known for being hostile toward EC grads (i.e. Illinois at that time) that anyone (EC students and grads) knew of at that time.

    I bring this up because you remarked that nobody knew of the AL case until recently even though it is several years old.
    I didn't even know what "allnurses.com" was until long after I graduated from EC and was working as an RN. I'm sure that there are still plenty of others (students and grads) who still know nothing about this website today.
    My point here is that this website isn't indicative of what we all consider to be "common knowledge."
    This may or may not have been a blessing because as I've read old threads from years ago that dated back to when I was deciding on an RN program, I noticed a lot of bad comments toward EC that may have swayed my decision back then, had I known about this website.
    Even today, I don't hear in everyday work life in any hospital where I've worked, in any state where I've worked, that EC is such a controversial and disliked program, regardlesss of one's motivation for disliking it.

    All of what I know about the negative stuff comes from here.
  8. by   suzanne4
    Quote from MedictoRN
    Have you ever considered a politics as a career? You have a keen ability to take what someone says and use just enough words from them and turn it around into something completely different.

    This "backdoor" is the SAME door that every other nurse from a different state would have to use to get licensed. It's call reciprosity. And it works just fine for 48 out of 50 states. I will be an EC grad in a few months and I am absolutely confident that I will work in any state I want to.

    No worries!!

    Good luck to you!
    Sorry but you are wrong on that. Reciprocity means only that the exam is accepted, it doesn't mean automatic acceptance of your schooling. That is where endorsement comes in, as reciprocity actually doesn't exist anymore. That was the term that was used when each state ahd their onw exam and you had to get a certain score on your exam in your state for you to be accpeted in the other state without having to take their exam.

    Most states require that you submit transcripts from your nurisng school, not just a previous license. This is where you will have problems.

    I still have to submit transcripts when I apply for a lciense and I graduated too many years ago to count. So there is no way arounf that. You need to look closer at what is required when you need to endorse to antoher state. Passage of NCLEX doesn't automatically give you a license in any state, you must meet their educational requirements.
  9. by   Sheri257
    Quote from RN34TX
    Perhaps never discussed on this particular BB until I brought it up a few weeks or so back, the AL case was well discussed in the EC circles when I was an EC student myself, so I can't take credit for discovering it because it spread like wildfire on EC's own student discussion boards as well as a CPNE website several years ago and that's where I learned about it.
    It really was the first documented case of denial of licensure in a state that wasn't normally known for being hostile toward EC grads (i.e. Illinois at that time) that anyone (EC students and grads) knew of at that time.

    I bring this up because you remarked that nobody knew of the AL case until recently even though it is several years old.
    I was referring to the discussions on this BB. Despite numerous threads on the subject, I don't think anybody here knew about the Alabama case until you brought it up.

    I think there does need to be a clear resource where people can refer to the latest comprehensive info on the BON's. The closest I've seen is the Istudysmart website but, it doesn't seem to be entirely accurate either.

    For example, they say you can get into Illinois with an EC BSN, but they don't mention that you have to work two years in another state which, as you pointed out, seems to be a requirement whether you have an ADN or BSN. And they don't mention the Alabama paramedic case at all ... just the vague "individual basis."

    No wonder people are confused. Maybe there should be a sticky with the latest, comprehensive info since people keeping posting threads asking about this.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 14, '05
  10. by   traumahawk99
    Quote from suzanne4
    Sorry but you are wrong on that. Reciprocity means only that the exam is accepted, it doesn't mean automatic acceptance of your schooling. That is where endorsement comes in, as reciprocity actually doesn't exist anymore. That was the term that was used when each state ahd their onw exam and you had to get a certain score on your exam in your state for you to be accpeted in the other state without having to take their exam.

    Most states require that you submit transcripts from your nurisng school, not just a previous license. This is where you will have problems.

    I still have to submit transcripts when I apply for a lciense and I graduated too many years ago to count. So there is no way arounf that. You need to look closer at what is required when you need to endorse to antoher state. Passage of NCLEX doesn't automatically give you a license in any state, you must meet their educational requirements.

    and the educational requirement is fullfilled by sitting for the nclex in another state. i've called state boards and been told this information. in fact, can you tell me which board denies ec for reciprocity? the requirment for submitting a transcript doesn't mean they deny it. call and ask them point blank, as i have. i think you'll find only 3, and you can practice in illinios after 2 years. but don't take my word for it ... please call and find out directly from the boards you're concerned with.

    i've met many ec grads who have been nurses for years. the negative seems to come from misinformation and fear propogated on this site. i don't think there's a mass movement to discredit and deny excelsior college. society needs nurses, and ec is a source of them.

    interestingly, half the nurses graduated from ec are males. can any other program make that claim? what does this say about the failure of traditional nursing schools with male students? the profession has a problem, and ec is an innovative solution.

    and you'd think california would focus on an alternative way to credential nurses who graduate from ec, pass the nclex, and practice in another state for a period without problems. after all, california is screaming for nurses. to deny someone (for example, a critical care certified rn practicing in another state) licensure in california is simply irresponsible and ego driven. if someone's health has to suffer because a nurse wasn't available, it would only be poetic justice if that someone was a board member who made this decision.

    does anyone really think it's "easier" and a "shortcut" to become a paramedic (we're talking clinicals here.. i did 700 hours), pass the excelsior exams, pass the cpne, and pass the nclex? we're talking about being at the level of a graduate nurse of an asn program, not a brain surgeon. why would the nln endorse this program? are they being bribed, and it's corrupt? is the nln incompetent? in my mind, they are dedicated and responsible educators fullfilling their mission to society.

    i would agree that ec had some problems initially by allowing emt's and cma's in the program. that's something that the college has already addressed in a responsible manner.

    i'm proud of my excelsior education. and that will be reflected in the outstanding care my patients will recieve.
  11. by   MedictoRN
    Quote from suzanne4
    Sorry but you are wrong on that. Reciprocity means only that the exam is accepted, it doesn't mean automatic acceptance of your schooling. That is where endorsement comes in, as reciprocity actually doesn't exist anymore. That was the term that was used when each state ahd their onw exam and you had to get a certain score on your exam in your state for you to be accpeted in the other state without having to take their exam.

    Most states require that you submit transcripts from your nurisng school, not just a previous license. This is where you will have problems.

    I still have to submit transcripts when I apply for a lciense and I graduated too many years ago to count. So there is no way arounf that. You need to look closer at what is required when you need to endorse to antoher state. Passage of NCLEX doesn't automatically give you a license in any state, you must meet their educational requirements.
    The point I was making was that it is the same process for EC grads as it is for everyone else, and the same rules apply. Not that it was automatic.
  12. by   pedinurse05
    Quote from MedictoRN
    The point I was making was that it is the same process for EC grads as it is for everyone else, and the same rules apply. Not that it was automatic.

    Medic--

    As a fellow EC grad, I can tell you that the process is not always the same for EC grads. Some states require documented clinical/precepted hours in another state to be submitted with your application. Some states only license LPN EC grads...(florida being one of them). California will just deny your application if you graduated after the cut date. I think what others are saying here is there are more restrictions on EC grads than other states...and yes the application process for those states can be different.
  13. by   FocusRN
    Well, well, well. Acutually I live in Louisiana (from New Orleans, residing in Baton Rouge because of Katrina) But any way I am planniing on going the EC route for paramedics. I just wanted to inform you that in my state it is true that you will only get initial RN licensure if you were first an LPN as a graduate of EC, but wait. If you were'nt an LPN, the BON requires six months of experience. Meaning (and I have had this verified by the board's director of education), you go to another state sit for NCLEX and work for six months, or go to another state sit for NCLEX, come back to louisiana and work for the VA, or another health care facility that will hire you temporarily with out state licensure and work there for 6 months, or you can go to another state take the NCLEX, and get reciprocity here which the board will allow. Why is that way, well in my opinion just as someone else said to give lip service to the traditional schools, and boy do they give it.

    Oh, and if you don't believe me, or believe that I am giving misinformation call the BON and ask. I called in June, and and the call was very informative.



    Quote from lizz
    So if you're a paramedic, and Louisiana, Florida, Rhode Island and Washington states require you to be an LPN, you still think you're going to get a license through reciprocity? Not to mention, the Alabama BON has a decision posted on their website denying an EC paramedic licensure.

    What evidence is there that these five states are going to throw out their criteria and give you a license? They don't license non-LPN's in their own state, but they're going to license non-LPN's from out-of-state? That makes a lot of sense.

    I don't see how misinformation or speculation is going to help people like Firemedic, who are trying to make serious decisions about this issue. If people can't get licensed in certain states, they need to know that.

    If you actually have evidence to back up these claims, you should post it. Otherwise, it's totally misleading.


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