Need your input

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    I'm a new RN as of May 2012. Unfortunately the only RN experience I've had so far has been from a job that let me go last month. Since I've never been terminated before, I don't know what to do. I'd love nothing more than to pretend I never had that job...I'm hurt, upset and embarassed that I was let go. But is it better to use my only experience, or let future employers think I have none? 3 months doesn't seem like a lot, but it sure felt like it. I figure some is better than none, and I was an LPN for 11 years. I'm prepared to explain why my former job wasn't "a good fit", and I have plenty of excellent references. But usually aren't they just checking dates of employment? Are they able to ask about why someone was terminated?
  2. 7 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    We need to know why you were terminated before we can answer.
  4. 0
    My explanation was failure to meet employer's expectations, and had concerns if I would be able to provide independent patient care with the implementation of an electronic charting system and through the busy respiratory season (it was on a respiratory floor).
  5. 0
    tough call. I would be tempted to tell the truth, and add that I just did not have enough time to orient to get used to that environment.
  6. 1
    Quote from proud nurse
    I'm a new RN as of May 2012. Unfortunately the only RN experience I've had so far has been from a job that let me go last month. Since I've never been terminated before, I don't know what to do. I'd love nothing more than to pretend I never had that job...I'm hurt, upset and embarassed that I was let go. But is it better to use my only experience, or let future employers think I have none? 3 months doesn't seem like a lot, but it sure felt like it. I figure some is better than none, and I was an LPN for 11 years. I'm prepared to explain why my former job wasn't "a good fit", and I have plenty of excellent references. But usually aren't they just checking dates of employment? Are they able to ask about why someone was terminated?
    Contrary to popular belief, when verifying an applicant's work history, employers are not just limited to providing only dates of employment. Many employers stick to a "dates and rehire status only" policy when verifying employment to make their lives simple and to avoid any potential problems.

    But the truth is that employers may say anything that they like about you, provided that what they say is factual and accurate. So yes, an employer could tell them why you were fired as long as what they say is fact.

    TheCommuter wrote a great article about this topic that's somewhere around the forum...search for it and give it a read.

    Also, don't forget the grapevine: even if employers stick to the "dates and rehire status only policy" when it comes to verifying employment, nursing is a very small world. The odds are good that someone at your old job knows someone at your new job, and info about you can be passed along that way.

    IMO, the more honest you are, the better. How honest/upfront you want to be is your call.

    Best of luck.
    JustBeachyNurse likes this.
  7. 0
    Maybe you could/should call human resources yourself and find out what they will say?

    I wasn't terminated, but I resigned from a position and my former manager labeled me as no rehire. I'm pretty sure the reason was "spite." Anyway, I asked someone in human resources if they disclosed the rehire status AND reason for leaving bc if someone was told that I was no rehire, but not told that I resigned then they might just assume I was fired. Had I been fired, that would be one thing, but since I wasn't fired, I don't want anyone to draw conclusions that maybe I was fired for patient safety or attendance issues, etc. when I wasn't fired at all.

    I was told that they only disclose dates of employment. An employee told me that's a lie and that they tell more than that, but who really knows.

    I wouldn't leave that job off your applications though because you never know when it might come up. Someone you knew from there might get a job at your next place of employment and that would be awkward!
  8. 0
    Found that article that TheCommuter wrote:
    http://allnurses.com/nursing-job-sea...ob-760531.html

    Essentially, there's no law that states an employer can only provide dates of employment during an employment verification check. So even if they were to adopt a "dates only" policy, they are not legally obligated to stick to it.

    Good or bad: as long as what the employer says is factual, they can legally say it.
  9. 0
    Thanks everyone. I'm thinking heavily about updating my resume to include my time at the hospital. I think 3 months isn't much, especially when most employers are looking for more...but it's some. I really don't want to waste time discussing why I was fired, and I'm hoping if I can get an interview somewhere the questions will be minimal considering I wasn't fired for misconduct, unsafe patient care, etc. To me, "it wasn't a good fit" just sounds lame. And knowing what I know now about the cutthroat world of hospital nursing, I just want to move forward instead of dwelling on what went wrong at my last job. Uggghhh.

    I swear, it's always something....


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