septic pedophile wanted by FBI - page 2

i took care of a belly case that turned septic within the past two days. we found out yesterday morning that he is wanted by the fbi for pedophilia.. he has cancer all throughout, is sick and septic,... Read More

  1. by   meownsmile
    I agree it is the hospitals responsiblity to report his presence if the authorities dont know he's there.. but he is still a patient and deserves the same treatment as any other on the unit. Someone with a higher authority than any of us will judge him soon enough it sounds like. Leave that to him.
  2. by   Turd.Ferguson
    Quote from meownsmile
    I agree it is the hospitals responsiblity to report his presence if the authorities dont know he's there..
    What about the person who has unpaid parking tickets? Or the prostitute who comes in with an STD? Report these people?

    I think not and neither does Health and Human Services.

    We could report a creep if he/she commits a crime while on facility premises. Or give his/her information to a qualified law enforcement officer if the officer inquires about the suspect. Otherwise, your/our job is health care. Reporting the suspect/criminal is (sadly) a violation of his/her civil rights.
  3. by   imenid37
    I have no time for pedophiles or a host of other peope in this world who do evil things. When I hear this on the news it makes my skin crawl. You aren't however, dealing with this man as a criminal or a pedophile or whatever he is. You are dealing with him as a patient. Then you must have time for him and his healthcare needs and do what is right because you are a professional. This means you are ethical and above using your position to judge or punish this guy. That is someone else's job. I know it is very hard to address the pt's psychosocial needs, in these cases, so just do your job and give yourself a pat on the back that you are a very upstanding person. I have cared for pregnant/labouring women who's other kids have been removed from the home for abuse and I know how it is. If you are able to be very professional, then I guess you are a better one to care for this man than those who are less able to be objective.
  4. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from Turd.Ferguson
    What about the person who has unpaid parking tickets? Or the prostitute who comes in with an STD? Report these people?

    I think not and neither does Health and Human Services.

    We could report a creep if he/she commits a crime while on facility premises. Or give his/her information to a qualified law enforcement officer if the officer inquires about the suspect. Otherwise, your/our job is health care. Reporting the suspect/criminal is (sadly) a violation of his/her civil rights.
    The law is different concerning those wanted by the FBI...anyway, the FBI already knew bc they came to the facility
  5. by   psalm
    ...but as health care professionals we are obligated to report any SUSPECTED child abuse; so why not turn him in AFTER he has gotten our care? You are still accountable when you are ill or dying...
  6. by   Katnip
    dfk, it sounds like you're doing the right thing. You're giving quality care to a patient regardless of your feelings toward him and things he's done in the past. That says a lot about YOUR character and professionalism. If you can avoid participating in the negative gossip with your coworkers then that says even more.

    ~Kat
  7. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    I say keep him alive as long as possible, that way he can suffer longer.

    We have to get back to punishing our prisoners, not treating them like gold while people are living on the streets.

    Now as for care, he should be given the same great care as any other patient because that is what you are licensed to do.
  8. by   yadda_yadda_yadda
    Wow--Harsh words from the coworker who wished this guy dead.

    I worked @ a correctional facility in Texas for 5 years...and if we'd have spent energy wishing that type thing on every patient (felons, obviously) we treated, we'd have been exhausted @ days end....not to mention, we'd have become really nasty individuals ourselves--consumed with thoughts of hate & revenge.

    Does the person who made those comments realize what that says about objectivity & ability to remain level headed & in control of emotion while on the job? Truly, truly scary. I wouldn't want to have someone like that ever take care of me..or any of my loved ones! Yikes!

    When this man passes away, there will be a reckoning--and that shouldn't be of any concern to anyone---but him.
  9. by   chasBSN
    I would not do anything against him, but I would have no sympathy for him. If he was my patient, I would still carry out the orders, give him his meds, and so on, but I can't say I would give him that extra care I give to my other patients; back rubs, a touch on the arm for reassurance. I just couldn't do it. He is a sick individual that got what he deserves. I am only human. I would do no harm, but definately would not go the extra mile. And for judging him, how could you not? What if it were one of your kids he had touched?
  10. by   mercyteapot
    I would do my job, which is to provide competent care. I have no obligation to give a crap if he dies, though...
  11. by   pinefarmgirl
    There willl probably be patients in your work who have done as much or more, but you never knew about it.

    In this country, did we forget innocent until proven guilty?? people accused of something are not automatically guilty, so I don't think it would be up to us to judge guilty or innocent until we hear all the evidence. Since their legal file rarely is inserted in their chart, it would be better if we can forget the gossip and just be the nurse.
  12. by   mercyteapot
    Innocent until proven guilty applies only in a court of law. It means you can't be sentenced for a crime unitil you've been convicted by a jury of your peers (on the other hand, you can still be incarcerated up until your trial). It isn't an obligation for Joe Q. Public to reserve judgment, particularly if the facts are compelling. I would never gossip about any patient, though, b/c of ethical and professional considerations.
    Last edit by mercyteapot on Dec 3, '05
  13. by   ShayRN
    Quote from chasBSN
    I would not do anything against him, but I would have no sympathy for him. If he was my patient, I would still carry out the orders, give him his meds, and so on, but I can't say I would give him that extra care I give to my other patients; back rubs, a touch on the arm for reassurance. I just couldn't do it. He is a sick individual that got what he deserves. I am only human. I would do no harm, but definately would not go the extra mile. And for judging him, how could you not? What if it were one of your kids he had touched?
    :yeahthat::yeahthat::yeahthat::yeahthat::yeahthat: :yeahthat::yeahthat::yeahthat::yeahthat::yeahthat:

    You all are better people than I am. I would give the required care, but would have no sympathy. As far as reporting him? In a NEW YORK minute. Wouldn't bat an eye.

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