How much Verbal Abuse should a nurse take from a PATIENT? - page 7

I have just started a new home health care case. My client is a well to do person and treats the other nurses and myself like DIRT... Constant verbal abuse is a norm from this client. We have... Read More

  1. by   Destinystar
    the patients need to learn to remain silent when their miranda rights are being read to them. what do you think that if you dont take care of a violent patient that the patient wont get care?? the prisons all have hospitals and nurses to take care of them.:angryfire
    Quote from dixiedi
    the post that i responded to when i said "grow up" was not in response to her objecting to being hit (and other) by a pt but by her attitude that she shouldn't have to subjected to this kind of behavior.
    i don't think it's right either, but that's the way it is. that behavior is one of the symptoms that must be treated by the nurse, not something she can complain about and stop with some unknown exterior force. yes, set limits. i do it every time i go to one kids house. (he's a good foot taller than i am and quite a good handful at 17. had a heart attack and suffered anoxic brain injury at 14.) anyway, he has a mouth on him, his favorite is "*****" and he bites. i remind him every visit this behavior in not tolerated. he is alert and oriented, he is "with it"; however, there are extenuating circumstances; that is anoxic brain injury. so, you learn to duck.
    we all know when independant people loose their independance they retaliate any way they can. it's not right, but it is humanity. learn to duck if you are going to last 30 or more years in nursing.
  2. by   Moscow
    Quote from donmurray
    night owl, with all due respect, diagnosis is irrelevant to a situation where an employer is putting an employee at risk. Although it may be a factor in determining the patient's culpability, it is the harm to the nurse that is the problem needing speedy resolution.
    With the right diagnosis a patient might not actually have any culpability. I am speaking generally of course.
  3. by   natasha700
    Under no circumstances should you tolerate verbal or any abuse from a patient. I guess because they may have $$$$$ doesn't give them the right. I agree with the others document and do an incident report.

    I remember talking to a potential home health client and she got very rude with me and I told her right away I am not the nurse for you. The agency called me back and asked what had happened I simply told them she was very rude and nasty and I will not subject myself to that kind behavior when I do not have to. I guess they think nursing is synomonous to abuse! NOT.........
  4. by   Dixiedi
    Quote from natasha700
    Under no circumstances should you tolerate verbal or any abuse from a patient. I guess because they may have $$$$$ doesn't give them the right. I agree with the others document and do an incident report.

    I remember talking to a potential home health client and she got very rude with me and I told her right away I am not the nurse for you. The agency called me back and asked what had happened I simply told them she was very rude and nasty and I will not subject myself to that kind behavior when I do not have to. I guess they think nursing is synomonous to abuse! NOT.........
    My guess would be that I misunderstood the first post. I don't think anyone should "take it" either. but refusing to care for an individual without makeing efforts to restructure their behavior is not quite what I had in mind. I've been a nurse for over 30 years, doesn't make me smarter than anybody else just exposed to a lot more pts. Most of the disagreeable folks can be swayed to be more cooperative. Though I have run into a few that were just hateful old women. (Never ran into a man like that but I am sure they are out there!)
  5. by   barefootlady
    Dixiedi,
    I admire your attitude. While I would document every incident of abuse, speak with the supervisor, and refuse to care for this client without another caregiver present. I would hope that a frank discussion with this client by the supervisor could result in this client being able to receive the care needed.
  6. by   uk_nurse
    my answer to this is NONE u shouldnt have to take any verbal abuse ur there to help them. We have a policy on agressive and verbal abuse in our hospital. Dont u?
  7. by   Krissy NY
    During my first job in a nursing home as a CNA I had to take care of a very grouchy man in his 80's. Whenever I had his hallway and he knew it was me he went nuts with the callbell and although capable of getting to the bathroom with some assistance he always had a BM in his bed.

    He would ring and tell me "it's too late, I made a mess" and somehow it was my fault. Well, as I cleaned him up he would carry on about how stupid I was and how I would never make a nurse, how I was crazy. I went to my charge nurse about it and she seemed annoyed with me..like..go do your job, you are, after all, my maid. I don't think so!

    I refused to go back into his room. I was treated as badly by the CNA's as I was by the resident so I complained of a migrain and went home. THe supervising nurse was alos nasty and said "everyone has told me you are upset because of something a resident said to you and you are NOT sick and you look fine and go back and see what he needs" even after I explained what he did to me.

    I refuse to be treated like a dog...and their are nurses out there who don't care how the residents treat the cna's, they could break your nose and you would be told to get over it and go do your job in this facility.

    I don't think so. Maybe this is why there is such a huge nursing shortage.
  8. by   CHIRN
    I tolerate the mental and physical abuse to a certain extent...mainly because of my working environment. In the ICU, we tend to get a great deal of hypoxic, demented, and mentally ill patients (schizophrenics and bi-polars seem to gravitate to our unit). But there is only SO much one person can take. Last week, after hours of verbal and finally physical abuse (my patient hit me), I had to step out of the room and literally count to ten slowly. Fortunately, there are days patients tend to "reap what they sow". One of my patients was a paranoid schizophrenic, violent, and verbally abusive. One day, after many attempts to hit me and screaming at me he decided he would spit on me. However, he forgot that he was wearing a venti mask at the time. So...the lugie(sp?) that he sent flying hit him squarely in his face. What a shame...
  9. by   Dixiedi
    Quote from Krissy NY
    During my first job in a nursing home as a CNA I had to take care of a very grouchy man in his 80's. Whenever I had his hallway and he knew it was me he went nuts with the callbell and although capable of getting to the bathroom with some assistance he always had a BM in his bed.

    He would ring and tell me "it's too late, I made a mess" and somehow it was my fault. Well, as I cleaned him up he would carry on about how stupid I was and how I would never make a nurse, how I was crazy. I went to my charge nurse about it and she seemed annoyed with me..like..go do your job, you are, after all, my maid. I don't think so!

    I refused to go back into his room. I was treated as badly by the CNA's as I was by the resident so I complained of a migrain and went home. THe supervising nurse was alos nasty and said "everyone has told me you are upset because of something a resident said to you and you are NOT sick and you look fine and go back and see what he needs" even after I explained what he did to me.

    I refuse to be treated like a dog...and their are nurses out there who don't care how the residents treat the cna's, they could break your nose and you would be told to get over it and go do your job in this facility.

    I don't think so. Maybe this is why there is such a huge nursing shortage.
    Oh, I don't mean for this to sound rude to you but I'm sure it will come out that way if I don't first suggest you keep a very open mind when you read it, OK?
    Is you personality that type that allows people to "get to you?" Maybe this old man took advantage of you because he could. Could it be that the other CNAs wouldn't have tolerated it from him so he took his frustrations out on you. Could the other CNAs and the nurse/s have done the same thing?
    If you are the kind of person that other people can pretty easily "get to" then please take a course in assertive training.
    I don't mean to sound mean, I don't know you or them but it seems if everybody was mean it could be that your personality is not strong enough and they simply took their frustrations out on you becasue they could.
    NO, they shouldn't have but frustrated people often do and I don't want to see you give up on nursing down the road because you are "easy" prey.
  10. by   pghfoxfan
    Duct tape works nicey
  11. by   trvlnRN
    Quote from billssisbeth
    I have just started a new home health care case. My client is a well to do person and treats the other nurses and myself like DIRT... Constant verbal abuse is a norm from this client.

    We have been called the "w" word for prostitute, the "s" word for loose woman, the "B" word for female dog and worse.

    the last shift I worked this client pulled my hair, slapped at me, sniped, spit and was totally "with it" during every episode.

    This client's tounge is like a two sided razor and I'm needing advice on how to Doctument the abuse with out being personal, catty or unprofessional.

    HELP!!!!
    Your question asked how much verbal abuse should a nurse take from a patient. My answer is "NONE" set your boudaries and be firm! That is unacceptable.

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How much Verbal Abuse should a nurse take from a PATIENT?