How Hospitals CREATED A Shortage of Nurses - page 2

March-April. 2000 Vol.1 - No.2 By Don DeMoro Don DeMoro, director of the Institute for Health & Socio-Economic Policy, has authored numerous studies critiquing health care... Read More

  1. by   Brownms46
    I found this article online, and it written by a Republican entrepreneur. While there are "some" true facts in his statements, please read WHY nurses have cut back hours, and HIS solutions to the nursing shortage!

    This man can be seen rubbing elbows with ole bushy boy, and others! So I felt compelled to write him, and tell as politely as I could, what I thought about his "article":


    http://summation.typepad.com/summati...tanding_t.html


    Understanding the Nursing Shortage
    The United States is facing a severe nursing shortage that threatens the underpinnings of our health care system. We can take steps now that can provide short and long term solutions to this looming crisis.

    The United States employs over 2.2 million registered nurses (RNs) - the largest professional category in America. There are currently over 120,000 unfilled nursing positions. By 2015, another 400,000 nurses will be needed. The RN shortage hurts patient care and already leads to thousands of unneeded deaths per year.

    Recommendations:

    1. Direct Health and Human Services to use some of the already-earmarked Nurse Reinvestment Act dollars to market nursing as a second career. With less than a two-year degree, one can make a good living working just part-time. A concentrated marketing effort will attract more Americans to the nursing profession and help solve the long-term shortage.
    2. Allow foreign nurses to take the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX), the test that accredits nurses in the U.S., in their country of origin. Today, qualified nurses from abroad can only take the examination on American soil, which is a significant barrier to attracting new talent. Making it easier for foreign nurses to come to the U.S. will ease the short-term burden.



    Justification ...


    Key imbalances

    * In 1980, the average age of a nurse was 38 compared to the current 45 year old average.
    * The current average age of retirement for a nurse is just 52.

    * The average age of an RN is increasing more than twice as fast as all other occupations in the U.S.

    * The number of students graduating from nursing school is smaller than the number of nurses that are retiring each year.

    * Fewer nurses entering into the nursing field resulted in experienced nurses retiring or cutting back on hours due to the increased stress.

    * The nursing profession is effectively pulling from half the population - only 10% of nurses are men.

    * While the number of new nurses increased 3.7% in 2001 and 8.0% in 2002, there were still 10,000 fewer nurses in 2002 than in 1995.


    Demand is increasing

    Two main factors cause heightened demand for nurses:

    1. Aging population. In 2000, there were 34.7 million people in the U.S. over 65 years old. By 2020, there will be over 53 million people over 65.
    2. Regulatory burdens. In 2001, six new states limited overtime for nurses. Also, states like California now require all hospitals to have a one-to-five nurse to patient ratio (the average is one-to-seven today).


    Wages

    Nursing salaries average $47,000/year and wage increases have significantly outpaced inflation each of the last six years.

    The wage increases have unexpectedly resulted in a backward-bending supply curve where many nurses have actually cut back their hours because they only want to earn a specific amount per year annually. Therefore, while higher wages attract new nurses in the long term, they create greater shortages in the short-term due to less total nursing hours.


    A looming healthcare crisis can only be averted if we act now and act resolutely.

    October 14, 2003 in Current Affairs | Permalink
  2. by   Brownms46
    Does this bother anyone else?
  3. by   BBFRN
    Yes, it bothers me. I think he forgets a lot of key points, and I wonder if he took the time to actually talk to any nurses out there. I'd be interested in his reply to you when you get it. Maybe we should all email this guy?
  4. by   tiliimnrn
    Brownmn46- I just want to tell you that I sat here and sobbed as I read everything that you posted.....I have been trying to get a rise out of some other nurses to do something. I feel so vindicated by what you wrote. I've felt that my CHOSEN career of nursing is going down the tubes soooooo fast that I can hardly hang on for the ride down. I'm not an emotional person, but what you've been writing has come directly from my mind, I swear... I don't know what to do, or say to help get other nurses involved too, and I don't know where to start. I've been looking all over the internet trying to find somewhere I can go to get a start on fighting this disease running rampent through our profession. I don't want to be the only one out there screaming, talking, warning about what is going on in the medical field....Money has definitely gotten to be more important to these institutions then patient care...I don't even call them hospitals anymore, because they aren't, they're money grubbing institutions. Thank you again for your postings, you did my heart good. Now on to the papers with this info.
  5. by   mato_tom
    non - nurse here, but intersted in the profession and the issues......

    what exactly is mandatory overtime? if asked to stay for an extra hour when your shift is up and you refuse ..is that grounds for termination?

    at this time do you get paid extra for OT? time and 1/2 or what? is OT based on 36 or 40 hours?

    what will happen if the new labor laws concerning OT go into effect, does that mean you will not get paid extra for OT?

    i ve just started looking into nursing for a career, but from what i see and hear ...i dont know.

    How is it that such a large profession, has such a weak voice. What % of nurses are members of the ANA and is the ANA a total joke or what?

    I realy think its going to take a 180 degree turn in attitude of the avg nurse for things to improve....its all well and good and warm and fuzzy that the patient must come first and you do this job so you can help people and blah blah blah......but you are getting screwed, how can you help people when you are miserable at work and stressed out. With such massive numbers i dont see how nurses cannot get thier voices heard, except that perhaps the woman dominated profession is just too passive.
  6. by   oramar
    This certainly sounds like the usual industry baloney. "Nurses are reducing their hours because there wages have gone up so fast." Yup, this guy is in bed with the hospital CEOs for sure. We all make far to much money as far as managment is concerned. As for me, I have reduced my hours because the job is so freaking difficult and that is pretty much true across the board. Matter of fact, I did not work for over three years for the exact same reason.
    Quote from Brownms46
    I found this article online, and it written by a Republican entrepreneur. While there are "some" true facts in his statements, please read WHY nurses have cut back hours, and HIS solutions to the nursing shortage!

    This man can be seen rubbing elbows with ole bushy boy, and others! So I felt compelled to write him, and tell as politely as I could, what I thought about his "article":


    http://summation.typepad.com/summati...tanding_t.html


    Understanding the Nursing Shortage
    The United States is facing a severe nursing shortage that threatens the underpinnings of our health care system. We can take steps now that can provide short and long term solutions to this looming crisis.

    The United States employs over 2.2 million registered nurses (RNs) – the largest professional category in America. There are currently over 120,000 unfilled nursing positions. By 2015, another 400,000 nurses will be needed. The RN shortage hurts patient care and already leads to thousands of unneeded deaths per year.

    Recommendations:

    1. Direct Health and Human Services to use some of the already-earmarked Nurse Reinvestment Act dollars to market nursing as a second career. With less than a two-year degree, one can make a good living working just part-time. A concentrated marketing effort will attract more Americans to the nursing profession and help solve the long-term shortage.
    2. Allow foreign nurses to take the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX), the test that accredits nurses in the U.S., in their country of origin. Today, qualified nurses from abroad can only take the examination on American soil, which is a significant barrier to attracting new talent. Making it easier for foreign nurses to come to the U.S. will ease the short-term burden.



    Justification ...


    Key imbalances

    • In 1980, the average age of a nurse was 38 compared to the current 45 year old average.
    • The current average age of retirement for a nurse is just 52.

    • The average age of an RN is increasing more than twice as fast as all other occupations in the U.S.

    • The number of students graduating from nursing school is smaller than the number of nurses that are retiring each year.

    • Fewer nurses entering into the nursing field resulted in experienced nurses retiring or cutting back on hours due to the increased stress.

    • The nursing profession is effectively pulling from half the population – only 10% of nurses are men.

    • While the number of new nurses increased 3.7% in 2001 and 8.0% in 2002, there were still 10,000 fewer nurses in 2002 than in 1995.


    Demand is increasing

    Two main factors cause heightened demand for nurses:

    1. Aging population. In 2000, there were 34.7 million people in the U.S. over 65 years old. By 2020, there will be over 53 million people over 65.
    2. Regulatory burdens. In 2001, six new states limited overtime for nurses. Also, states like California now require all hospitals to have a one-to-five nurse to patient ratio (the average is one-to-seven today).


    Wages

    Nursing salaries average $47,000/year and wage increases have significantly outpaced inflation each of the last six years.

    The wage increases have unexpectedly resulted in a backward-bending supply curve where many nurses have actually cut back their hours because they only want to earn a specific amount per year annually. Therefore, while higher wages attract new nurses in the long term, they create greater shortages in the short-term due to less total nursing hours.


    A looming healthcare crisis can only be averted if we act now and act resolutely.

    October 14, 2003 in Current Affairs | Permalink

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