chest pain

  1. hi, how can one effectively treat chest pain in a client/patient?
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   Fgr8Out
    Treatment of chest pain is dependent upon the cause of the pain....

    In our post-op lap surgeries (choles, appys)... it's not uncommon for them to develop chest pain as a result of the gas used to inflate the abdominal cavity during the procedure. I medicate the patient as I would for any pain... and discuss with them the rationale for their chest pain. It generally subsides fairly soon, and I provide reassurance for the patient until such time.
  4. by   donmurray
    Acute chest pain, especially if radiating down the left arm, have someone call an ambulance, and get you an aspirin. Don't drive! it worked for me!
  5. by   live4today
    Originally posted by donmurray
    Acute chest pain, especially if radiating down the left arm, have someone call an ambulance, and get you an aspirin. Don't drive! it worked for me!

    Don't get me an aspirin unless you want to be sued by my family for sending me into anaphylactic shock! I'm soooooo allergic to aspirin and all NSAIDS. Check those allergy bands, or allergy bracelets, or ask if the client/patient is allergic to aspirin before you go giving it to them.
  6. by   CATHYW
    Originally posted by PATAPON
    hi, how can one effectively treat chest pain in a client/patient?
    Patapon, are you a nurse, or a student?

    If you are a nurse, what type of chest pain are you referring to? MI, GERD, hiatal hernia, PE, atelectasis, costochondritis, etc?:stone
  7. by   LilgirlRN
    Chest pain is difficult to treat in that it has so many causes. Lots of "things" in the chest cavity..we're talking anything from MI to pneumonia, cholecystitis, costachondritis. To effectively treat your patient you have to determine the cause. So, what is causing this particular patient's pain?
  8. by   fedupnurse
    Always rule out a cardiac cause first. What is the patient's history? If there is a history of cardiac problems assume it is cardaic. Get a 12 lead ECG. If the patient has a history of GERD, I'd still assume it is cardiac until I am sure it isn't. I work ICU so we would do the 12 lead then give Nitro SL start a drip if there isn't already one there if we do find it is cardiac. If the nitrates don't work or the ECG is normal, we then go to GI and give Mylanta or Maalox. One good burp usually does it. But play it safe-always assume cardiac until you are proven otherwise. Just like you always assume it is V Tach until proven otherwise.
  9. by   nurse kratchet
    well said, fedupnurse

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chest pain